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October 18, 1994 | From Associated Press
Queen Elizabeth II, leaving behind the latest Royal Family flap, came to the Kremlin on Monday on the first visit to Russia by a British monarch. A new authorized biography of her son and heir, Prince Charles, threatened to overshadow the visit by the queen and her husband, Prince Philip. In the book, Charles accuses Philip of forcing him into a loveless marriage. Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's chief spokesman, Vyacheslav V.
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NEWS
October 11, 1993 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For a few minutes Sunday evening, some of Russia's leaders let their passion for ballet vanquish their passion for politics. Dance legend Maya Plisetskaya, born in 1926 and long the prima ballerina of Moscow's most famous stage, returned to the Bolshoi Theater where she first danced half a century ago. "There is a sensation in Moscow: Plisetskaya is back on the Bolshoi stage after a long break," Russian TV news reported happily.
NEWS
July 1, 1997 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year after her practical advice helped win him a second term, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin has rewarded his 37-year-old daughter, Tatyana Dyachenko, with an official job as presidential image-maker. Yeltsin spokesman Sergei V. Yastrzhembsky told reporters Monday that Dyachenko will be responsible for the president's image, but he gave no details.
NEWS
November 14, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's snowing in Moscow, and those who speak for Boris N. Yeltsin want it known that the Russian leader, while seriously ill, is not insensitive to commuters stuck in snowbound traffic and elderly pedestrians slipping on the ice. Just the other day, the president's press service reported, Yeltsin summoned Moscow Mayor Yuri M. Luzhkov to his hospital bedside and dressed him down for the clumsy response by the city's 4,000 snowplows to this winter's first storm.
NEWS
December 25, 1993 | From Associated Press
Four masked gunmen holed up in a military helicopter packed with explosives freed seven children and their teacher Friday but apparently held on to seven other hostages. The release of five girls, two boys and the teacher came after the gunmen were given $10 million in cash they demanded on the second day of a drama that began when the men raided a school about 275 miles northwest of here. They had threatened to kill hostages if they did not get the money, Russian Television reported.
NEWS
January 25, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The shadowy and powerful hard-liners in President Boris N. Yeltsin's inner circle are trying to consolidate their power by creating an elite National Guard to neutralize any internal threats, Russia's leading newspaper reported Tuesday. The article in the daily Izvestia was seen as the latest in a series of signals that Kremlin hawks and a resurgent KGB are trying--albeit fitfully and with resistance--to reimpose Soviet-style political controls on Russia.
NEWS
October 7, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A remote-controlled bomb gravely wounded Russia's top commander in Chechnya on Friday, provoking vows of retaliation and warnings that the bloodletting that began in the republic 10 months ago may be poised for another escalation. The attack that left Gen. Anatoly A. Romanov struggling for his life with severe head and abdominal wounds was the second assassination attempt on a senior federal official in the rebel Russian republic in 2 1/2 weeks. President Boris N.
NEWS
June 21, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a long night of Kremlin intrigue, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin fired three powerful Cabinet ministers Thursday, continuing a purge of unpopular hard-liners before a runoff election against his Communist challenger. The ousted men--Gen. Alexander V. Korzhakov, Yeltsin's personal security chief; Gen. Mikhail I. Barsukov, head of the Federal Security Service; and Oleg N.
NEWS
January 22, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What seemed implausible a few weeks ago is now all but official: Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin--who stumbled through the past year with an unpopular war, single-digit approval ratings and heart ailments that confined him to bed for nearly four months--is up and running for reelection.
NEWS
June 28, 1996 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The president of Russia was speaking to villagers by the White Sea when a wet gust of Arctic wind ripped through his famous pompadour, leaving it a flattened tangle. It was a minor but awkward setback in a reelection campaign that runs heavy on image. Without his snowy dome in proper contour, Boris N. Yeltsin looks, well . . . less than presidential. Until a few weeks ago, there was no one at his side who could have rescued Yeltsin from a bad hair day without looking just as ridiculous.
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