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Olga Appell

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April 28, 1992 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It certainly wasn't the most romantic proposal, but Brian Appell simply had to ask. "Olga, dear," Appell, an exercise physiology buff, said to his wife early one morning. "May I take your pulse?" One minute--and 38 heartbeats later--Brian Appell had his answer: His wife was born to run. Never mind that she had no athletic background. Her slow heart rate, Brian figured, signaled potential success. That was five years ago.
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SPORTS
March 7, 1994 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olga Appell felt her first pride in U.S. citizenship on Thursday, when she was introduced for the first time as a U.S. runner. Even reporters at that news conference cheered. "She was really affected by that, she realized what she had done," said her husband, Brian. But only three days later, she felt her first annoyance. It happened Sunday in the Los Angeles Marathon, which Appell eventually won with a personal best time of 2 hours 28 minutes 12 seconds. It was the fastest time by a U.S.
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SPORTS
March 3, 1994 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Funny how joining a country of 248 million can make a person feel so alone. Olga Appell raised her right hand with 109 others at the Albuquerque Elks Club last Friday and shivered not in joy, but weariness. It was supposed to be a day of excitement, of liberation. With one oath, Mexico's fastest female marathoner became the United States' fastest female marathoner. She had made the most important run of her life, a run for the border. And she had finished. So why did she feel so strange?
SPORTS
March 3, 1994 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Funny how joining a country of 248 million can make a person feel so alone. Olga Appell raised her right hand with 109 others at the Albuquerque Elks Club last Friday and shivered not in joy, but weariness. It was supposed to be a day of excitement, of liberation. With one oath, Mexico's fastest female marathoner became the United States' fastest female marathoner. She had made the most important run of her life, a run for the border. And she had finished. So why did she feel so strange?
SPORTS
March 7, 1994 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olga Appell felt her first pride in U.S. citizenship on Thursday, when she was introduced for the first time as a U.S. runner. Even reporters at that news conference cheered. "She was really affected by that, she realized what she had done," said her husband, Brian. But only three days later, she felt her first annoyance. It happened Sunday in the Los Angeles Marathon, which Appell eventually won with a personal best time of 2 hours 28 minutes 12 seconds. It was the fastest time by a U.S.
SPORTS
March 6, 2000
Men *--* 1986 Rick Sayre 2:12:59 1987 Art Boileau 2:13:08 1988 Martin Mondragon 2:10:19 1989 Art Boileau 2:13:01 1990 Pedro Ortiz 2:11:54 1991 Mark Plaatjes 2:10:29 1992 John Treacy 2:12:29 1993 Joselido Rocha 2:14:28 1994 Paul Pilkington 2:12:13 1995 Rolando Vera 2:11:39 1996 Jose Luis Molina 2:13:23 1997 El-Maati Chaham 2:14:16 1998 Zebedayo Bayo 2:11:21 1999 Simon Bor 2:09:25 2000 Benson Mbithi 2:11:55 *--* Women *--* 1986 Nancy Ditz 2:36:27 1987 Nancy Ditz 2:35:24 1988 Blanca Jaime 2:36:11
SPORTS
March 5, 2001
MEN *--* 1986 Ric Sayre 2:12:59 1987 Art Boileau 2:13:08 1988 Martin Mondragon 2:10:19 1989 Art Boileau 2:13:01 1990 Pedro Ortiz 2:11:54 1991 Mark Plaatjes 2:10:29 1992 John Treacy 2:12:29 1993 Joselido Rocha 2:14:28 1994 Paul Pilkington 2:12:13 1995 Rolando Vera 2:11:39 1996 Jose Luis Molina 2:13:23 1997 El-Maati Chaham 2:14:16 1998 Zebedayo Bayo 2:11:21 1999 Simon Bor 2:09:25 2000 Benson Mbithi 2:11:55 2001 Stephen Ndungu 2:13:13 *--* WOMEN *--* 1986 Nancy Ditz 2:36:27 1987 Nancy Ditz 2:35:24
SPORTS
February 10, 1992 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Olga Appell of Mexico, running with the strongest incentive known to amateur athletes--a chance to make an Olympic team--emphatically won Sunday's 11th annual Long Beach Marathon in a time of 2 hours 30 minutes 43 seconds. Appell, who trains in Albuquerque, N.M., beat former teammate Maria Trujillo, who ran 2:35:40, and Maureen Custy-Roben, third in 2:41:54.
SPORTS
March 2, 1997 | JIM HODGES
* WHEN: Today, 8:45 a.m. * TV: Channel 13 (8 a.m.) * RADIO: KACD/KBCD-FM 103.1 (6 a.m.) * WHERE: Starts at 6th and Figueroa streets; finishes at 8th and Figueroa. * COURSE: 26 miles 385 yards winding through the streets of Los Angeles. * PRIZE MONEY: $15,000 and a car to winners of men's and women's divisions.
SPORTS
April 20, 1997 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the defining day for marathon running by Americans: April 18, 1994. A strong west wind blew Bob Kempainen from Hopkinton, Mass., to downtown, in 2 hours 8 minutes 47 seconds. No American has run the distance faster than Kempainen ran in that 98th Boston Marathon. He finished seventh, behind two Kenyans, two Mexicans, a Korean and a Tanzanian. Where once there was a Golden Age of marathon running, now there is only brass, as far as the sport exists for Americans.
SPORTS
April 28, 1992 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It certainly wasn't the most romantic proposal, but Brian Appell simply had to ask. "Olga, dear," Appell, an exercise physiology buff, said to his wife early one morning. "May I take your pulse?" One minute--and 38 heartbeats later--Brian Appell had his answer: His wife was born to run. Never mind that she had no athletic background. Her slow heart rate, Brian figured, signaled potential success. That was five years ago.
SPORTS
March 7, 1994 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was paid to run fast, but not too fast. He was paid to run far, but not too far. Quick but harmless, Paul Pilkington was known to Los Angeles Marathon runners Sunday as the "rabbit." Somebody else was supposed to win. For $3,000, Pilkington was supposed to quit. But with nearly a two-minute lead and 10 miles remaining, Pilkington's legs had other ideas. Or was that his pride? Whatever, the rabbit pulled a marathon out of his hat.
SPORTS
April 20, 1997 | JIM HODGES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a long-running play that winds through eight sets of scenery, with its 101st performance carried out over 26 miles 385 yards of plots, subplots and intrigue, with occasional dashes of comedy and a fair amount of personal tragedy. Its story has many lines: * will Moses Tanui again lead his people and everyone else's to the Promised Land? * will Cosmas Ndeti go with God, or will he find out God has gone with somebody else? * will Dionicio Ceron establish a new world order?
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