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Olinda Landfill

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1989
The county Waste Management Commission will consider proposals today to expand the Olinda Canyon landfill in Brea and to acquire one of six other possible landfill sites in north Orange County. The commission will be discussing a report that concludes that an expansion of the Olinda landfill is the county's best short-term option for disposing of solid wastes, but adds that the county should consider acquiring another large canyon as a long-term landfill.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2000 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first the job seemed easy. Excavate and move dirt to build a giant hole and increase capacity at the county's Olinda Alpha landfill near Brea. But when contractors snagged the first boulder weighing 50 to 60 tons, they knew there might be trouble. It took special equipment and time--two things that can quickly run up construction costs--to deal with the problems. Then they hit sandstone as hard as bedrock.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1985 | --Jane Galbraith \f7
The Orange County Board of Supervisors Wednesday voted unanimously to buy 50 acres to expand the Olinda Sanitary Landfill over the objections of local residents and the Brea City Council. The landfill consists of two dumps, one of which was officially closed two years ago. The other is open six days a week. The 50 acres was acquired for $250,700 from the Boy Scouts after several years of negotiations. With the acquisition, the dump site will encompass 500 acres.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1996 | JOHN POPE
The city will not be held liable for any legal action resulting from the controversial Olinda Heights housing development, which is being built on former oil fields near a landfill and earthquake fault. Under an agreement reached this week, property owner Santa Fe Energy Resources agreed to indemnify the city for damages related to the landfill or other potential problems at the site, said James R. Cutts, the city's development services director.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County officials may soon begin inviting a limited number of Los Angeles haulers to dump about 2,500 tons of garbage each day in county landfills. If adopted, the proposal would end a decades-old ban on outside trash in local landfills. The idea, outlined in a memo by the head of the finance committee of Orange County's Integrated Waste Management Commission, comes in response to the potential annual loss of $12 million in dumping fees at the Olinda landfill near Brea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1992 | LYNDA NATALI
Over the objections of residents, the City Council has approved an agreement with the county aimed at addressing concerns about a proposal to expand the Olinda Landfill. The agreement was drafted by city staff to update a previous county-sponsored environmental report detailing how the dump's expansion plans could affect the community. City staff had assailed the original document, which is yet to be approved by the Board of Supervisors, as inadequate and potentially harmful to the community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1992 | LYNDA NATALI
The City Council this week acceded to citizens' demands to include the public's concerns in an agreement with the county over the expansion of the Olinda Landfill. Last month, in anticipation that the Board of Supervisors would approve the dump expansion, city officials drew up a list of demands aimed at addressing environmental and other potential problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of Orange County's largest waste haulers has pulled much of its business out of a county-run landfill, forcing the county to impose an emergency hiring freeze and consider raising fees as it scrambles to make up a projected $12-million yearly loss. "This is a big chunk of money," said Frank J. Bowerman, director and chief engineer of the county's Integrated Waste Management Department. "It's created quite a problem for us."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1992 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to rid North County of about 2 million tons of solid waste a year, the County Board of Supervisors next week is expected to approve the expansion of the Brea-Olinda landfill under a plan released Thursday. It is estimated that the existing two landfills in the North County now have less than seven years of life between them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1992 | LYNDA NATALI
Residents with concerns over the proposed expansion of the Olinda Landfill will have an opportunity to discuss them tonight during a special meeting at City Hall. County officials who have worked on the landfill project will be on hand to answer questions about the dump proposal and consider residents' recommendations. The meeting, which was called by the City Council, is an attempt to get concerns on the record.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1995 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a novel bid to generate revenues from rotting garbage, the Board of Supervisors approved a proposal Tuesday to convert methane gas produced at two landfills into electricity that could power more than 11,000 homes. Under the plan, the county is set to enter into a long-term agreement with a private firm that will operate sophisticated gas recovery systems at the Bowerman landfill in Irvine and the Olinda landfill in Brea. The firm, GSF Energy Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1992 | BERT ELJERA
It won't happen until the year 2013, but residents are already planning how best to use the 500 acres of the Olinda-Olinda Alpha landfill after it is closed. Community Services Director Ret Wixted said a community advisory committee is being formed to work with city and county officials in planning the future of the landfill, near Valencia Avenue and Carbon Canyon Road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 1992 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Board of Supervisors' formal approval Tuesday on expansion of the Brea-Olinda landfill will buy the county time to consider how to dispose of its mounting piles of garbage so a long-term solution can be developed, officials said. The Brea-Olinda fill had been scheduled to close in 1997 but will be extended through 2013 under an agreement that has won the grudging support of Brea officials and other area residents who had opposed expansion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1992 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tackling two of the county's most vexing problems, the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday approved plans for closing the county's budget gap and cleaning up North County's garbage woes. In response to what Supervisor Don R. Roth termed a "fiscal crisis," a unanimous board agreed to permanently eliminate 709 now-vacant positions and freeze nearly 700 others through mid-1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1992 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seeking to rid North County of about 2 million tons of solid waste a year, the County Board of Supervisors next week is expected to approve the expansion of the Brea-Olinda landfill under a plan released Thursday. It is estimated that the existing two landfills in the North County now have less than seven years of life between them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1992 | LYNDA NATALI
The City Council this week acceded to citizens' demands to include the public's concerns in an agreement with the county over the expansion of the Olinda Landfill. Last month, in anticipation that the Board of Supervisors would approve the dump expansion, city officials drew up a list of demands aimed at addressing environmental and other potential problems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 1992 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tackling two of the county's most vexing problems, the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday approved plans for closing the county's budget gap and cleaning up North County's garbage woes. In response to what Supervisor Don R. Roth termed a "fiscal crisis," a unanimous board agreed to permanently eliminate 709 now-vacant positions and freeze nearly 700 others through mid-1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1996 | JOHN POPE
The city will not be held liable for any legal action resulting from the controversial Olinda Heights housing development, which is being built on former oil fields near a landfill and earthquake fault. Under an agreement reached this week, property owner Santa Fe Energy Resources agreed to indemnify the city for damages related to the landfill or other potential problems at the site, said James R. Cutts, the city's development services director.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 1992 | LYNDA NATALI
Residents with concerns over the proposed expansion of the Olinda Landfill will have an opportunity to discuss them tonight during a special meeting at City Hall. County officials who have worked on the landfill project will be on hand to answer questions about the dump proposal and consider residents' recommendations. The meeting, which was called by the City Council, is an attempt to get concerns on the record.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1992 | LYNDA NATALI
Over the objections of residents, the City Council has approved an agreement with the county aimed at addressing concerns about a proposal to expand the Olinda Landfill. The agreement was drafted by city staff to update a previous county-sponsored environmental report detailing how the dump's expansion plans could affect the community. City staff had assailed the original document, which is yet to be approved by the Board of Supervisors, as inadequate and potentially harmful to the community.
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