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Olive Neighborhood

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2000 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's an old agrarian enclave struggling to keep its identity as suburbia encroaches on all sides. Olive, 12 blocks off Lincoln Avenue at the northern tip of Orange, is among the oldest communities in Orange County--second only to San Juan Capistrano. One by one, the landmarks that defined the town--the drugstore, the post office, the fire station, the mammoth Sunkist citrus packinghouse--have faded into the history books.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2000 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's an old agrarian enclave struggling to keep its identity as suburbia encroaches on all sides. Olive, 12 blocks off Lincoln Avenue at the northern tip of Orange, is among the oldest communities in Orange County--second only to San Juan Capistrano. One by one, the landmarks that defined the town--the drugstore, the post office, the fire station, the mammoth Sunkist citrus packinghouse--have faded into the history books.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2000 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's an old agrarian enclave struggling to keep its identity as suburbia encroaches on all sides. Olive, 12 blocks off Lincoln Avenue at the northern tip of Orange, is among the oldest communities in Orange County, second only to San Juan Capistrano. One by one, the landmarks that defined the town--the drugstore, the post office, the fire station, the mammoth Sunkist citrus packinghouse--have faded into history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2000 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's an old agrarian enclave struggling to keep its identity as suburbia encroaches on all sides. Olive, 12 blocks off Lincoln Avenue at the northern tip of Orange, is among the oldest communities in Orange County, second only to San Juan Capistrano. One by one, the landmarks that defined the town--the drugstore, the post office, the fire station, the mammoth Sunkist citrus packinghouse--have faded into history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1996 | TIM MAY
Los Angeles County Supervisor Zev Yaroslavsky will give an update on the county's budget status and related financial issues Monday at a community meeting sponsored by the Olive View Neighborhood Watch. Yaroslavsky will also address local concerns at the public meeting, including the status of El Cariso Park and services at Olive View/UCLA Medical Center. The meeting will begin at 7:30 p.m. at Sylmar Community Church, 13901 Polk St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1993 | GEOFFREY MOHAN
A proposal to build a police academy in Sylmar has ignited deep animosity among community activists, pitting the Chamber of Commerce against a Neighborhood Watch organization and an equestrian group. The latest salvo was fired this week, when Sylmar Chamber of Commerce President Frank Jacobs, a staunch supporter of the academy proposal, appeared at an Olive View Neighborhood Watch meeting to challenge the plan's detractors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1989 | LYNN O'SHAUGHNESSY, Times Staff Writer
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday agreed to set aside space on the grounds of Olive View Medical Center for the construction of a private facility for emotionally disabled children. The board instructed county officials to search for qualified providers who could operate a facility for emotionally disturbed boys who have become unadoptable in the county system. Most of the boys, ages 9 to 14, have been abused and have bounced from one foster home to another.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1991 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County supervisors approved a proposal Tuesday that they hope will lead to construction of a business park, retail stores and an upscale restaurant on 37 acres of surplus county land near Olive View Medical Center in Sylmar. The proposal by the county's Asset Development Division calls for the county to seek a developer willing to pay an estimated $260 million over 66 years in a combination of lease payments and profit-sharing from businesses at the site.
NEWS
July 6, 1989 | Clipboard researched by Kathie Bozanich and Susan Davis Greene / Los Angeles Times; Graphics by Doris Shields / Los Angeles Times
The small Olive neighborhood, first known as Old Santa Ana and now surrounded by Orange, is the second-oldest settlement in the county; only San Juan Capistrano is older. While time has obscured precisely how it was born, there are at least two tales of how Olive came to be named. The first and most frequently repeated account is that in 1878 the Yorba and Peralta families settled here and planted a huge olive orchard. Version No.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1989 | LYNN O'SHAUGHNESSY, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County's self-imposed moratorium on developing vacant land at Olive View Medical Center in Sylmar could be ending soon, according to a report released Tuesday to the Board of Supervisors. County officials have estimated that leasing a small portion of the hospital's property to a private developer could generate $20 million in revenue for the cash-strapped county during the next 20 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1993 | JAMES ZOLTAK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hannah Dyke, who helped found the Sylmar Graffiti Busters five years ago, has garnered many accolades for her anti-tagging crusade, with the most recent coming last week from the Los Angeles City Council and county Board of Supervisors. But none speak quite so eloquently of her work's impact as that bestowed by the very tagging crews she has battled on a daily basis: an obscene, two-letter tag referring specifically to her.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1990 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the second day of emotional testimony, the mother of Frank Martinez told jurors Friday that she saw her son fatally shot by a police officer at her 41st birthday party two years ago, but never saw him threaten or provoke the officer. "I saw a muzzle flash. . . , " Amanda Martinez said. "I never dreamed (her son) was going to die. I mean, I knew he had gotten shot, but I didn't know it was going to be that bad."
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