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FOOD
September 24, 2008
  Total time: 30 minutes Servings: 4 Note: To make lemon honey, combine one-fourth cup honey with one-half teaspoon lemon zest in a small saucepan. Steep the honey for several minutes over low heat and strain before using. Spanish chocolate is available at select Ralphs stores and specialty markets. 1 3/4 cups flour 2 tablespoons sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 egg, lightly beaten 1 1/2 cups buttermilk 4 tablespoons best-quality olive oil, preferably Spanish, plus more for frying 1/3 cup chopped dark chocolate, preferably Spanish 1/4 cup honey, preferably lemon Fresh mint leaves 1. In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda and salt.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
April 5, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
I have such a strong memory of nibbling on charred octopus tentacles between sips of ouzo on a terrace overlooking the sea in Santorini. Much as I've tried, I haven't turned up that particular way of eating octopus in SoCal. The good news, though, is that lately the tasty cephalopod is showing up on more local menus - not only at Mediterranean restaurants but also at places with Mexican and Peruvian dishes. It's about time. Picca Peruvian Cantina At this exuberant Peruvian cantina, one of the standbys on the menu is chef-owner Ricardo Zarate's anticucho de pulpo - a small dish of boiled octopus marinated in lots of Peruvian chiles accented with oregano and cumin, then grilled over charcoal on the robata . It's served with baked and fried Kennebec potatoes and drizzled with a fiery rocoto rustico , a sauce of jalapeño and Peruvian black mint.
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NEWS
November 30, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
Pancakes are a natural for breakfast, but what about dinner? Go ahead, indulge yourself. Light and fluffy, these pancakes have that perfect buttermilk tang. But what sets them apart is a touch of olive oil -- rich and fruity, a good olive oil adds wonderful fragrant notes. And chopped dark chocolate adds pure magic to every bite (doesn't chopped dark chocolate add a little magic to just about anything?). Douse the pancakes with a little honey and fresh mint -- or garnish however you'd like -- and dig in. The whole dish comes together in half an hour.
FOOD
February 22, 2014 | By Russ Parsons
There is an ocean full of canned sardines at local markets, but which ones are really worth buying? Tasting through more than a dozen samples, the range of quality was astonishing. There were sardines that were as bland as beige, and then there were fish that were absolutely magnificent. To help make sense of the journey, I enlisted Lou Amdur, owner of Lou Provisions & Wine and a sardine lover from way back. We sampled sardines from a variety of sources: regular supermarkets, high-end markets, Asian markets and specialty markets such as the Harbor City Spanish store La Española Meats.
FOOD
February 3, 2011 | By Rene Lynch, Los Angeles Times
When life gives you olive oil, Theo Stephan has a suggestion: Make a pie. Or a tart. Or cookies. Or a velvety chocolate sauce. The founder of the Global Gardens line of olive oils and specialty food products, Stephan makes about 2,000 gallons of olive oil a year. Needless to say, there are bottles of it everywhere in her home. She has no shortage of recipes that will allow the flavors of the olive oil to shine through — scrambled eggs, a brushing of olive oil to brown a grilled cheese sandwich or sauteeing vegetables for a lasagna.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
Forget about all the butter we Americans are supposed to be consuming, I'm deep into olive oil practically every meal, lavishing a slab of grilled country bread with the intensely fruity Tuscan oil and sopping up every bit of the remains on my plate. This is from my annual shipment of olio nuovo (new oil) from the Rare Wine Co. in Sonoma. The color is an iridescent jade-chartreuse,  gorgeous to behold. This is olive oil more as food than condiment. I float a thread on winter minestrone or pasta fagioli, eat halved avocados with a drizzle of the oil, dip artichoke leaves in a little dish of olio nuovo . I get my fix every year from the Rare Wine Co., which has been bringing in a selection of new oils from Tuscany for almost 20 years now. This year, after tasting the new oils in November, Rare Wine founder Mannie Berk chose oils from half a dozen wine estates in Tuscany.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1993 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN
Uncle Stavros Cafe in Hermosa Beach looks like your typical beach breakfast and lunch spot. There's a pleasant, plant-filled patio with umbrella-topped tables, and the dining room is bright and airy because of floor-to-ceiling windows that let in breezes from the ocean, a block away. But, as fans of "Kojak" may remember, Stavros is a Greek name, and what sets this restaurant apart is a list of Greek specialties.
FOOD
April 27, 2013
As much as I love great olive oil, I also recognize that depending on how you're using it, you don't always need the most expensive. As a general rule, I use good olive oil for cooking; great olive oil for making salad dressings; and the very best olive oil when it is being drizzled over an item as a "finishing oil. " Some of my favorite brands are: Alziari, Capezzana, Castello di Ama, Fontodi, Monini DOP, Núñez de Prado and Olio Verde. When shopping for olive oil: Look for olive oil that comes in a non-clear bottle; a good oil's herbaceous qualities are destroyed by heat and light.
FOOD
July 12, 2006 | Barbara Hansen, Times Staff Writer
The voluptuous cheese filling in AOC's stuffed squash blossoms is just one reason this dish is so wonderful. A lemony aioli drizzled over the top blends with the nuttiness of pepitas (squash seeds). Restaurant critic S. Irene Virbila alerted us to this dish, created by Suzanne Goin. Says Goin, "I think they are so fun and delicious and fresh tasting while still having that indulgent fried and melted cheese aspect."
NEWS
December 11, 2012 | By Russ Parsons
If you've ever been in Italy in the late fall and early winter, you know how amazing the perfume of really fresh olive oil can be -- artichokes, green beans, call me crazy but I get something deeply floral, like roses and, oh yes, olives. The problem is, fresh oil doesn't last very long and it rarely seems to ship well. All of those vibrant grassy aromas and flavors mellow into something that's quite delicious, but nutty rather than vegetal. But I've just found the first California oil so far that delivers that remarkable olio nuovo pungency.
FOOD
February 8, 2014 | RUSS PARSONS
Anyone who can turn on an oven knows the difference between broccoli and cauliflower, right? One is green and shaped like a tree and the other is white and looks more like a brain. Well, it turns out it's a little trickier than that. In fact, these two heady members of the brassica family are a lot more closely related than might be apparent. Actually, there are many members of the family that fall in between. There are even white broccolis, oddly enough. Perhaps the most recognizable example is the gorgeous romanesco broccoli, which looks like an experiment in fractal geometry that can fit on your dinner plate.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2014 | By David Pierson
ARTOIS, Calif. - Nestled in a corner of the Sacramento Valley known for its rice, almonds and walnuts, densely packed rows of manicured olive trees stretch toward the horizon. This 1,700-acre spread is the domain of California Olive Ranch, an upstart company with big ambitions. The U.S. is the world's No. 3 consumer of olive oil, drizzling 293,000 metric tons of the stuff over salads and pizzas last year. Yet almost every drop was produced overseas in countries including Spain, Italy and Greece.
NEWS
January 10, 2014 | By S. Irene Virbila
Forget about all the butter we Americans are supposed to be consuming, I'm deep into olive oil practically every meal, lavishing a slab of grilled country bread with the intensely fruity Tuscan oil and sopping up every bit of the remains on my plate. This is from my annual shipment of olio nuovo (new oil) from the Rare Wine Co. in Sonoma. The color is an iridescent jade-chartreuse,  gorgeous to behold. This is olive oil more as food than condiment. I float a thread on winter minestrone or pasta fagioli, eat halved avocados with a drizzle of the oil, dip artichoke leaves in a little dish of olio nuovo . I get my fix every year from the Rare Wine Co., which has been bringing in a selection of new oils from Tuscany for almost 20 years now. This year, after tasting the new oils in November, Rare Wine founder Mannie Berk chose oils from half a dozen wine estates in Tuscany.
FOOD
October 11, 2013
Total time: 1 hour, 20 minutes Servings: 6 Note: Adapted from "The Book of New Israeli Food" by Janna Gur. Pomegranate concentrate or molasses is available at select Jons markets, cooking supply stores and Middle Eastern markets. 3 to 4 medium beets 2 tablespoons pomegranate concentrate or molasses 2 to 3 tablespoons lemon juice 2 to 3 small, dried red chile peppers, crushed Coarse sea salt 1/2 cup fresh cilantro leaves 1 cup pomegranate seeds 1/4 cup lightly flavored olive oil 1. Cook the beets in a covered medium saucepan of boiling water until tender, 45 to 50 minutes.
FOOD
August 30, 2013
Total time: 1 hour Servings: 4 Note: Donna Deane was inspired by specialties of France, Spain and Denmark while developing ideas for an article on open-faced sandwiches. Here she combines Manchego, the Spanish cheese, now widely available, with our local Mission figs for a summery treat. 1/4 cup sweet white wine such as Muscat de Beaumes-de-Venise 6 black Mission figs, cut in half 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided 6 cups sliced onions, 1/4 -inch thick 1 teaspoon sugar 1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves 1 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 4 slices organic multi-grain bread, toasted 3 ounces shaved Manchego cheese Fleur de sel 1. In a small saucepan, heat the Muscat to warm and pour it over the fig halves in a bowl.
FOOD
August 16, 2013
Total time: 1 hour, 10 minutes Servings: 4 to 6 1 red bell pepper 1 yellow bell pepper 1/2 cup olive oil plus 1/2 teaspoon, divided 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 1/2 teaspoon minced garlic 1 tablespoon minced shallot Kosher salt, coarse black pepper 1 large globe eggplant, about 1 1/2 pounds 10 fresh basil leaves, torn Fleur de sel 1. Coat the peppers with one-half teaspoon of olive oil....
NEWS
June 15, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Pour some more of that EVOO on your plate -- a study finds that eating more olive oil could be linked with lower stroke risk in older people. Medical records of 7,625 people 65 and older who lived in three French cities were examined by researchers to determine how their olive oil consumption affected their chances of having a stroke. The participants had no history of stroke at the beginning of the study. Olive oil is a component of the Mediterranean diet, which is rich in healthy fats (like olive oil and nuts)
BUSINESS
January 25, 2014 | By David Pierson
ARTOIS, Calif. - Nestled in a corner of the Sacramento Valley known for its rice, almonds and walnuts, densely packed rows of manicured olive trees stretch toward the horizon. This 1,700-acre spread is the domain of California Olive Ranch, an upstart company with big ambitions. The U.S. is the world's No. 3 consumer of olive oil, drizzling 293,000 metric tons of the stuff over salads and pizzas last year. Yet almost every drop was produced overseas in countries including Spain, Italy and Greece.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By S. Irene Virbila
We've all been to catered events where the main finger food is a big bowl of chilled broccoli and cauliflower florets meant to dip in a bowl of ranch dressing or cheesy dip. It's not all that wine-friendly, really. That dressing can kill the wine, not to mention the vegetal taste of the raw broccoli especially. If you love good olive oil, pinzimonio is the way to go. It's an Italian antipasti of raw vegetables to dip in peppery extra-virgin olive oil, preferably Tuscan. Sometimes, it's just raw carrots and celery stuck in a jar. More often, it's those gorgeous baby purple artichokes so tender they can be eaten raw. And when you get lucky, it can be a beautifully assembled platter of all sorts of vegetables.
FOOD
June 14, 2013
Total time: About 45 minutes, plus marinating time for the fish Servings: 4 to 6 Note: This is also good with loup de mer (or branzino) or rockfish. 1 cup dry bread crumbs 2 cloves garlic 2 tablespoons fresh parsley 1/2 teaspoon grated lemon zest 1/3 cup plus 3 tablespoons olive oil, divided 2 (1 1/2-to-2-pound) whole Tai snappers, cleaned Salt Juice of 1 lemon 1/4 cup stems and trimmings from assorted herbs (such as basil, parsley and rosemary)
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