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Olive Trees

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OPINION
April 18, 2010 | By Mike Madison
This spring, I have been planting young olive trees on my farm in the Sacramento Valley. The variety is Taggiasca, native to Liguria. It yields a delicate, fruity, aromatic oil with just a hint of pungency. The rows of trees are spaced 22 feet apart, and for the first few years, while the trees are small, I can grow another crop in the alleys: melons in summer, fava beans in winter. Putting the trees in the ground is the easy part. They're small, rooted cuttings, with a stem about the size of a pencil, and don't require much of a hole to be dug. More troublesome is the network of pipes and tubes that will deliver a slender stream of water to the base of each tree during the dry season.
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BUSINESS
January 25, 2014 | By David Pierson
ARTOIS, Calif. - Nestled in a corner of the Sacramento Valley known for its rice, almonds and walnuts, densely packed rows of manicured olive trees stretch toward the horizon. This 1,700-acre spread is the domain of California Olive Ranch, an upstart company with big ambitions. The U.S. is the world's No. 3 consumer of olive oil, drizzling 293,000 metric tons of the stuff over salads and pizzas last year. Yet almost every drop was produced overseas in countries including Spain, Italy and Greece.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1994
I am one of the many unhappy residents of Varsity Street. You only have to drive down our street to see why. This year, we had an overabundance of olives due to the trees not being sprayed last year and the heavy rains we experienced last winter. I have a big, ugly, loaded tree right outside my house. From November through April, huge overripe olives have rained down on my driveway, sidewalk (which is now solidly black) and street. I have written to the Parks Department, personally spoken with (Councilman)
WORLD
December 13, 2013 | By Laura King and Batsheva Sobelman
CAIRO -- Snow coated domes and minarets Friday as a record Middle East storm compounded the suffering of Syrian refugees, sent the Israeli army scrambling to dig out stranded motorists and gave Egyptians a rare glimpse of snow in their capital. Nearly three feet of snow closed roads in and out of Jerusalem, which is set in high hills, and thousands in and around the city were left without power. Israeli soldiers and police rescued  hundreds trapped in their cars by snow and ice. In the West Bank, the branches of olive trees groaned under the weight of snow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1988 | EDWARD B. HAVENS, United Press International
The olive branch, an ancient symbol of peace emblazoned on the United Nations flag, is unwelcome in one Arizona desert county which became the first to ban olives as a pollen nuisance. Pima County has declared war on the olive tree, first imported to California by Franciscan missionaries in 1769 and cultivated in Mediterranean lands for perhaps 54 centuries. The ripened fruit of the olive tree decorates swizzle sticks in martini glasses and canapes at holiday parties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1990 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mall manager winced when the word "chop" was used to describe the action taken against eight graceful old olive trees this week. "We didn't chop them down. We shortened them," Arthur Ross said. "They may be stumps now, but they will grow back as shrubs." But the sight of the sap-bleeding stumps evoked a sense of environmental indignation among many a mall shopper and proprietor at The Grove center on the southeast corner of Tampa Avenue and Nordhoff Street in Northridge.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1995 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami's "Through the Olive Trees" couldn't be more understated or modest, yet in its indirect way it exerts a cumulative emotional tug. As funny as it is poignant, it was inspired by two young people involved in the making of an earlier Kiarostami film, "And Life Goes On," an account of a father and son traveling through earthquake-ravaged portions of Iran.
MAGAZINE
December 7, 2003 | Susan Heeger
If you have one spot for a tree in your garden, make it an olive. Especially if the spot is sunny and your house, like the tree, has Mediterranean accents, such as a tile roof or stucco walls. Those plain walls and the olive's lacy leaves--green on top, silver below--were made for each other. Symbolically, peace, glory, riches and strength all flow from the olive. A white dove brought Noah a post-flood olive branch. The ancient Greeks believed their gods were born under the tree's boughs.
REAL ESTATE
October 29, 1989 | SHERYL KORNMAN, Kornman is a Los Angeles free-lance writer
Dozens of mature olive trees--some of them 100 years old--are being removed, one by one, and temporarily relocated for eventual replanting on the site of a 640-acre master-planned community in Fontana. The developer of the project will nurture them in a temporary nursery and replant them in 1991, once construction begins. The trees, about 1,000 of them, will be maintained at an irrigated nursery set up in the southwest corner of the site under the supervision of horticulturist Wayne Morgan.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2013 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Actress Cheryl Ladd has listed her 22.5-acre estate in Santa Ynez at $3.995 million. The Italian-style villa, with 6,557 square feet of living space, sits off a circular motor court ringed with potted olive trees, Italian cypress and native landscaping. A large foyer overlooks a sunken living room. Features include stone fireplaces, a covered colonnade loggia, four bedrooms, five bathrooms and beamed and paneled ceilings. Ladd, 61, joined the cast of "Charlie's Angels" from 1977 to 1981.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2013 | By Lauren Beale
Wanted: one rock star. Fresh on the market is a Modern-style house in Los Feliz that would be a contender in any king of cool contest. The 4,796-square-foot house stays connected to the outdoors with sleek decks and outdoor plazas. The main living areas “open up like an origami flower” to the saline swimming pool, the listing description states. Outside the lower-level suite is a garden with olive trees and a hillside spa. In keeping with the loft vibe, floors are concrete or hardwood.
FOOD
February 9, 2013 | By David Karp
As part of a great California olive oil boom, now at least a dozen olive oil vendors are selling at local farmers markets, up from only a couple a decade ago. Most offer a good product, but there are few who, like Michael O'Brien of Paso Gold , provide local, fresh, high-quality, certified organic oil, sold by the farmer himself in the agricultural section of the market. The combination of new varieties from Europe, high-density systems and mechanized harvest led to a surge in plantings of olives for oil, from a few hundred acres two decades ago to about 30,000 today, said Paul Vossen , a University of California farm advisor.
BUSINESS
January 2, 2013 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Actress Cheryl Ladd has listed her 22.5-acre estate in Santa Ynez at $3.995 million. The Italian-style villa, with 6,557 square feet of living space, sits off a circular motor court ringed with potted olive trees, Italian cypress and native landscaping. A large foyer overlooks a sunken living room. Features include stone fireplaces, a covered colonnade loggia, four bedrooms, five bathrooms and beamed and paneled ceilings. Ladd, 61, joined the cast of "Charlie's Angels" from 1977 to 1981.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Country singing giant Glen Campbell has sold his Mediterranean-style house in Malibu for $4.45 million. Built in 2004 and redone in 2009, the villa features a theater with a billiard room, living and family rooms, a den, four fireplaces, four bedrooms, 5.5 bathrooms and 6,540 square feet of living space. It sits on less than an acre in a gated community with mature palms, olive trees and a swimming pool. Campbell, 76, traveled the nation on his final tour this year. He announced last year that he has Alzheimer's disease.
WORLD
October 14, 2012 | By Los Angeles Times
ATMA, Syria - The rows of olive groves that line the hillsides like silent sentinels are bursting with life, both on the laden branches and the fruit-scattered ground below, where families camp out on mattresses and in tents. The trees appear healthy. The people are desperate. "We don't have enough food, we don't have proper shelter," a mother said as she spoon-fed donated lentil soup to her infant son the other day. "What will we do with winter coming?" The hundreds living amid the olive groves on the edges of this rebel-held town hugging the Turkish-Syrian border are among the 1.5 million Syrians left homeless in the conflict but still living in Syria.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
The self-taught filmmaker behind the documentary "5 Broken Cameras" says he uses the lens "to hold onto my memories. " For the Palestinian resident of the occupied West Bank, those memories involve not just family milestones but daily political struggle. Emad Burnat first got a camera in 2005 to film his newborn fourth son, Gibreel, and neighborhood activities in the village of Bil'in. Those activities included, with increasing frequency, demonstrations against Israel-erected barriers and the encroachment of Jewish settlements.
HOME & GARDEN
June 5, 2003 | Emily Green, Times Staff Writer
The olive tree occupies such a heroic place in history that it feels trivial, even sacrilegious, to describe it as an ornamental plant. But the slender gray-green leaves could scarcely be lovelier. No plant harvests sunlight so elegantly as the olive tree or has quite its magic with moonlight. To the beauty, add stamina and flexibility. After 6,000 years in domestication (give or take a millennium), the olive tree is the most versatile plant available to L.A. landscapers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1998 | ANN BANCROFT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
If Ed Rich's dreams come true, in a few years waiters won't simply ask diners which variety of wine they prefer with dinner. They'll also ask, "And with your bread? Manzanillo? Mission? Frantoio?" And diners, knowing full well the waiters are talking about olive oil, will pause only to consider their choices. Will it be Manzanillo, with its taste of fresh-picked apples? Or the rare Frantoio--dense, tangy, unmistakably olive? Or the light-bodied, nutty Mission Blend?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2012 | By Russ Parsons, Tribune Newspapers
Extra Virginity The Sublime and Scandalous World of Olive Oil Tom Mueller W.W. Norton: 238 pp., $25.95 In 1985, when I was a fledgling food writer, I got a tip on a big story. A friend had just come back from a winter trip to Tuscany. There had been a freeze, he told me. Not just a little "whoops, we lost some leaves" chill, but a mega-momma that had devastated the region. Olive oil, which was just becoming a part of the American gourmet lexicon, had been particularly hard hit. I reported out the story, calling importers, other experts with contacts in Tuscany, and even olive growers in the region itself.
FOOD
February 3, 2011 | By Rene Lynch, Los Angeles Times
When life gives you olive oil, Theo Stephan has a suggestion: Make a pie. Or a tart. Or cookies. Or a velvety chocolate sauce. The founder of the Global Gardens line of olive oils and specialty food products, Stephan makes about 2,000 gallons of olive oil a year. Needless to say, there are bottles of it everywhere in her home. She has no shortage of recipes that will allow the flavors of the olive oil to shine through — scrambled eggs, a brushing of olive oil to brown a grilled cheese sandwich or sauteeing vegetables for a lasagna.
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