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NEWS
September 21, 1986
Re the "fictional Greek island called Paxos": True, Cleopatra and almost every other traveler in the last 2,000 years has hurried past it in order to visit nearby Corfu, but the island is a charming place that produces some of the finest olive oil in Greece. You can find Paxos on the map just below Corfu in the Ionian Sea. JOHN McKINNEY Santa Barbara
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FOOD
March 28, 2007 | Betty Hallock, Times Staff Writer
A bright, pungent tapenade spiked with anchovies and lemon juice and long wedges of tortilla crackers studded with sesame seeds make a winning combination of appetizers. Ciudad's house olive tapenade recently caught the attention of the Food section website producer, Tenny Tatusian. "It was a lovely balance of flavors -- the olives were somewhat tamed, but still bracing," Tatusian says. "It's a dish I'd love to serve at my next dinner party -- especially alongside untamed martinis."
FOOD
March 10, 2012
Total time: 25 minutes Servings: 4 to 6 1 cup fresh bread crumbs 2 cloves garlic, split in half lengthwise 1 teaspoon lemon zest Olive oil Salt 1 pound kale 4 teaspoons lemon juice 1 ounce Parmigiano-Reggiano, grated or shaved with a vegetable peeler 1. Toast the bread crumbs: Combine them in a small saucepan with the garlic, lemon zest and 3 tablespoons olive oil. Stir to coat well....
NATIONAL
July 25, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Forty years later, Henry A. Moak Jr. still loves his pound cake. The Army colonel popped open an old military C Ration can of pound cake at his retirement ceremony at the Pentagon this week and dug in. Moak got the drab olive can as a Marine helicopter pilot off the Vietnamese coast in 1973. He vowed to hang on to it until the day he retired. "It smells good," Moak said as he took a bite.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1989 | RUTH REICHL
Mark Peel was the first chef at Spago. Nancy Silverton made the pastries famous. Together they have two children and the terrific La Brea Bakery. Now they've got a restaurant as well: Saturday their long-awaited Campanile, 624 S. La Brea Ave., Los Angeles, (213) 938-1447 will finally open its doors. It's a beautiful building with a huge courtyard, a fountain and an open kitchen. And it's a beautiful menu too: rustic, straightforward and very appealing. These are just a few of the dishes: a wonderful salad made with walnut bread and artichoke hearts ($5.50)
FOOD
January 12, 2013
  While most experienced cooks can agree - more or less - on basic equipment, the pantry is much more a matter of individual choice. How you cook will determine what you cook, in this case. If you prefer Italian, you're going to want a greater variety of dried pastas and at least a couple of olive oils. If you cook Japanese, you'll be choosier about rice and different kinds of soy sauce. This is my highly personal list of the things I need in my basic pantry. Baking All-purpose flour Granulated sugar Light brown sugar Powdered sugar Baking soda Baking powder Cornmeal Spice cabinet Dried thyme Dried oregano Black peppercorns Vanilla extract Ground cinnamon Cloves Bay leaves Dried red pepper flakes Cumin Fennel seeds Kosher salt Almonds Walnuts Pantry staples Olive oil Vegetable oil Soy sauce Vinegars, at least red wine and sherry Canned beans (white, pinto, garbanzo)
NEWS
July 28, 2005
I read with interest Valli Herman's article "L.A.'s French Impressions" [July 14]. Have you discovered the wonderful little jewel of a French restaurant in South Pasadena called Nicole's? Enter, and you are in Paris. Nicole is French. She mostly sells ingredients that only gourmet cooks even know about. Her sandwiches are simple, with fresh vegetables, fantastic bread, unbelievable olive oil, and she has recently begun serving wine. The business has had to spill over on to the sidewalk with umbrellas and flowers.
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