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Oliver Hardy

ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1992 | BARBARA SALTZMAN
Hal Roach, who turned 100 Tuesday with much fanfare and whoop-di-do, may be best known for pairing Arthur Stanley Jefferson and Oliver Norville Hardy in the '20s. Many would say that the creation of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy was his finest achievement. After watching a new MGM/UA Home Video double-feature laser set ("The Devil's Brother" and "Laurel & Hardy's Laughing 20's," $40) spotlighting their comic genius, it would be hard to argue the point.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 1989 | KEVIN THOMAS
"Who's Harry Crumb?" (citywide)--he's John Candy as the klutziest detective since Peter Sellers' Inspector Clouseau. In this pleasantly silly private-eye spoof, Crumb is a grand poseur, shamelessly self-important, slow on the uptake yet good of heart and not the complete fool he so often seems. He's in constant battle with objects inanimate and otherwise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1994 | DAVID E. BRADY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bartine Zane, an actress whose career began in silent films opposite Buster Keaton and later included a return to the profession as a septuagenarian, has died. She was 96. A Burbank resident since 1951, Miss Zane died Friday at Saint Joseph Medical Center of congestive heart failure, said her longtime friend, Randy Sills. Born Feb. 9, 1898, in Robeline, La., she settled in Los Angeles with her family in 1916.
NEWS
February 21, 1990
Henry Brandon, a character actor who portrayed the villainous Squire Cribbs in Los Angeles' longest-running stage production, "The Drunkard," fierce Indian chiefs for John Ford and a foil for Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy, has died in his Hollywood home. The veteran of more than 100 films and dozens of stage productions was 77 when he died Thursday of an apparent heart attack. His agent, Gary Butcher, said Brandon was working until the time of his death, mostly doing voice-overs for commercials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 2005 | Steve Harvey
Further proof that you can't take it with you can be found on the Screen Actors Guild's website for unclaimed residuals, which lists Frank Sinatra among those owed money. Terrence Beasor of Santa Monica tipped me to the website (www.sag.org), which also lists such departed celebrities as Bud Abbott, Broderick Crawford, Gary Cooper, Jack Lemmon, Butterfly McQueen, Donna Reed, Natalie Wood and Loretta Young, not to mention Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2002 | ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A piece of Hollywood history went up in smoke Tuesday as a possible arson blaze gutted a turn-of-the-century apartment building once called home by an assortment of stars and celebrity hopefuls. One hundred firefighters battled for more than two hours to douse the flames that began to roar through the vacant 64-unit Hillview apartments at about 9:15 a.m., causing an estimated $500,000 in damage.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1991 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles residents this month will have first dibs on five new commemorative Postal Service stamps with caricatures of Bud Abbott and Lou Costello, Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy, Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy, Jack Benny and Fanny Brice. The comedians stamps, designed by noted cartoonist Al Hirschfeld, will be issued during a special ceremony in Hollywood at Mann's Chinese Theater and sold at post offices citywide on Aug. 29, before being offered nationally the next day.
NEWS
August 22, 2002 | DAVID C. NICHOLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Samuel Beckett devotees should relish "Waiting for Godot" at the Raven Playhouse. Director J. Wienckowski and a youthful cast invest this silent-movie approach to Beckett's absurdist benchmark with notable devotion. An archon of the avant-garde since its 1953 Paris premiere at the Theatre de Babylone, "Godot" is perhaps the 20th century's most influential play, seminally affecting Edward Albee and Harold Pinter, among countless others.
MAGAZINE
September 30, 1990 | MARTIN ZIMMERMAN
THE SIGN OUT FRONT is the first and best clue to what you'll find inside Pasadena's Starlight Roof--Classic American Music and Video: "Sorry, we do not sell rock 'n' roll, rap, heavy metal . . . no X-rated, no truck-crashing. We do sell big bands, shows and sound tracks and all the great films of Hollywood's Golden Era." Walking into Starlight Roof is like venturing back to an earlier time--a past you can return to when you get home after purchasing audio cassettes, CDs and videotapes.
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