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Oliver Sipple

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NEWS
March 8, 1989 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
In a letter that is being displayed at a gay bar here, former President Gerald Ford has acknowledged the death of Oliver Sipple, saying he will be "forever grateful" for the former Marine's action in averting a 1975 assassination attempt. A similar letter was sent to Sipple's family in Detroit. "Everybody appreciates it (the letter)," said Clint Trow, bartender at the New Bell Saloon, one of the bars that Sipple used to visit daily. "Everyone has asked to look at it."
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NEWS
March 8, 1989 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
In a letter that is being displayed at a gay bar here, former President Gerald Ford has acknowledged the death of Oliver Sipple, saying he will be "forever grateful" for the former Marine's action in averting a 1975 assassination attempt. A similar letter was sent to Sipple's family in Detroit. "Everybody appreciates it (the letter)," said Clint Trow, bartender at the New Bell Saloon, one of the bars that Sipple used to visit daily. "Everyone has asked to look at it."
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NEWS
February 13, 1989 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
The circumstances of Billy Sipple's death came as no surprise to his friends. Sometime around Jan. 19, Sipple turned on his television and lay on his bed, half-gallon bottles of cheap bourbon and 7-Up within reach, and fell asleep. Two weeks later, Wayne Friday stopped by Reflections, a Polk Street bar that was one of Sipple's daily stops. The bartender, worried that Sipple had not been by for days, asked Friday to check up on him. Without even opening the door of Sipple's apartment, Friday, an investigator for the San Francisco District Attorney, knew that his friend was dead.
NEWS
February 13, 1989 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
The circumstances of Billy Sipple's death came as no surprise to his friends. Sometime around Jan. 19, Sipple turned on his television and lay on his bed, half-gallon bottles of cheap bourbon and 7-Up within reach, and fell asleep. Two weeks later, Wayne Friday stopped by Reflections, a Polk Street bar that was one of Sipple's daily stops. The bartender, worried that Sipple had not been by for days, asked Friday to check up on him. Without even opening the door of Sipple's apartment, Friday, an investigator for the San Francisco District Attorney, knew that his friend was dead.
NEWS
February 6, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A disabled former Marine who said his life was ruined after he thwarted the possible assassination of President Gerald R. Ford in 1975 has been found dead in his apartment here. Oliver W. Sipple, 47, died of natural causes, the coroner's office said. His body was discovered Thursday by an acquaintance checking on him after he had not been seen for several days. An autopsy was performed, but the coroner's office declined Sunday to reveal the cause of death.
NEWS
April 1, 1990
"Outing . . . is not confined to dead folks," says Beth Ann Krier, Times staff writer. What follows is her lengthy explanation of what outing means, who it is confined to and what the "specialists" have to say about it. Here are some names mentioned in the article: Malcolm Forbes, Rock Hudson, Roy Cohn, Perry Ellis, Terry Dolan, Larry Kramer, Barney Frank, Gerry Studds, Thomas Foley, Robert Bray, Armistead Maupin, Gabriel Rotello, Paul...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2006 | John M. Glionna and Larry Gordon, Times Staff Writers
They are joined in a strange sisterhood by a pair of unhinged acts: In the autumn of 1975, 17 days apart, each tried to assassinate President Ford, who died this week at age 93. Today, Lynette Alice "Squeaky" Fromme and Sara Jane Moore are serving life sentences in federal prisons in Texas and California, respectively. The once headline-grabbing names have become historical footnotes embodying the extremism of a tumultuous era.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 2008 | Steve Chawkins, Larry Gordon and Richard Winton, Times Staff Writers
After more than three decades in prison for a foiled attempt to assassinate President Gerald R. Ford, Sara Jane Moore was released on parole Monday. Although Moore had been given a life sentence in the 1975 attempt on Ford's life outside a hotel in downtown San Francisco, she had been eligible for parole for some time.
NEWS
February 16, 1994 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oliver (Bill) Sipple didn't want any attention. Yes, he was a hero. He probably saved the President's life. On Sept. 22, 1975, while attending a San Francisco campaign rally for then-President Gerald Ford, he saw a woman aim a gun at Ford. Sipple--a disabled Vietnam veteran--instinctively knocked the gun from her hands. The woman, Sara Jane Moore, was sentenced to life in prison. Sipple's "sentence" was perhaps even worse.
NEWS
March 22, 1990 | BETH ANN KRIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Malcolm Forbes, the flamboyant publisher known for his relationships with hot-air balloons and Elizabeth Taylor, had been dead only a week when rumors about his sexual orientation hit the mainstream media. In a USA Today gossip column, Forbes, the divorced father of five children and grandfather of nine, was described as "leading a gay lifestyle for at least the last five years."
NEWS
February 6, 1989 | From Staff and Wire Reports
A disabled former Marine who said his life was ruined after he thwarted the possible assassination of President Gerald R. Ford in 1975 has been found dead in his apartment here. Oliver W. Sipple, 47, died of natural causes, the coroner's office said. His body was discovered Thursday by an acquaintance checking on him after he had not been seen for several days. An autopsy was performed, but the coroner's office declined Sunday to reveal the cause of death.
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