Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOlivia De Havilland
IN THE NEWS

Olivia De Havilland

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Despite winning two best actress Oscars -- for 1946's "To Each His Own" and 1949's "The Heiress" -- and appearing with Errol Flynn in some of the most acclaimed swashbucklers ever produced, including "The Adventures of Robin Hood," Olivia de Havilland is best known for her indelible performance as the sweet, compassionate Melanie in the 1939 classic Civil War epic, "Gone With the Wind."
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2013 | By Claudia Luther
Joan Fontaine, the coolly beautiful 1940s actress who won an Academy Award for her role in Alfred Hitchcock's "Suspicion" and who became almost as well-known for her lifelong feud with her famous older sister, Olivia de Havilland, died Sunday. She was 96. Fontaine died of natural causes at her home in Carmel, said her assistant, Susan Pfeiffer. In addition to winning an Academy Award as best actress for "Suspicion," Fontaine was also nominated as best actress for her role in Hitchcock's "Rebecca" (1940)
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2013 | By Claudia Luther
Joan Fontaine, the coolly beautiful 1940s actress who won an Academy Award for her role in Alfred Hitchcock's "Suspicion" and who became almost as well-known for her lifelong feud with her famous older sister, Olivia de Havilland, died Sunday. She was 96. Fontaine died of natural causes at her home in Carmel, said her assistant, Susan Pfeiffer. In addition to winning an Academy Award as best actress for "Suspicion," Fontaine was also nominated as best actress for her role in Hitchcock's "Rebecca" (1940)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2011
Olivia de Havilland rode a horse that later became famous as Roy Rogers' faithful Trigger in what movie? "The Adventures of Robin Hood"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2011
Olivia de Havilland rode a horse that later became famous as Roy Rogers' faithful Trigger in what movie? "The Adventures of Robin Hood"
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2003 | Nancy Tartaglione
In a quiet section of the 16th arrondissement lives one of the most enduring figures of American cinema. Olivia de Havilland has owned her three-story house near the Bois de Boulogne since 1956, when she succumbed to the charms of a Frenchman and decided to get some distance from Hollywood. However, at 86, the star of such classics as "Gone With the Wind," "The Heiress," "To Each His Own" and "The Snake Pit" is hardly a shrinking violet. The actress hasn't slowed down much and sparkles when recounting the past.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2006 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND, the last remaining great Hollywood star of both the golden '30s and '40s, is an irresistible woman. When the subject of birthdays comes up in the middle of an interview, she looks the writer straight in the eye and declares, "I'm old enough to be your mother!," promptly brushing aside all polite demurrals. There's something at once amusing and touching when the remark is directed at a man on the cusp of 70 and comes from a movie star who's about to turn 90.
SPORTS
November 6, 2002 | DIANE PUCIN
Gussie Moran had legs that went on forever. She walked, the late designer Ted Tinling said, as if she were tiptoeing across tennis balls. She was a California girl with a California tan. She was a jock, she was beautiful, it was 1949 and Gussie Moran showed her lace panties at Wimbledon. "Gussie was," says Jack Kramer, part of Los Angeles tennis royalty, "the Anna Kournikova of her time. Gussie was a beautiful woman with a beautiful body.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2006
De Havilland tribute: Two-time Oscar winner Olivia de Havilland will receive a rare tribute from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences on Thursday night. It will feature film clips of de Havilland's career, accompanied by her own remembrances.
NEWS
December 3, 1992 | JON MATSUMOTO
"The Heiress" (1949), directed by William Wyler. 115 minutes. Olivia de Havilland won an Oscar for her portrayal of Catherine Sloper, one of cinema's most memorable and heartbreaking doormats. In this truly tragic film, based on the Henry James novel "Washington Square," she falls for a wily gold digger (Montgomery Clift).
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2006 | Kevin Thomas, Special to The Times
OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND, the last remaining great Hollywood star of both the golden '30s and '40s, is an irresistible woman. When the subject of birthdays comes up in the middle of an interview, she looks the writer straight in the eye and declares, "I'm old enough to be your mother!," promptly brushing aside all polite demurrals. There's something at once amusing and touching when the remark is directed at a man on the cusp of 70 and comes from a movie star who's about to turn 90.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2004 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Despite winning two best actress Oscars -- for 1946's "To Each His Own" and 1949's "The Heiress" -- and appearing with Errol Flynn in some of the most acclaimed swashbucklers ever produced, including "The Adventures of Robin Hood," Olivia de Havilland is best known for her indelible performance as the sweet, compassionate Melanie in the 1939 classic Civil War epic, "Gone With the Wind."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2003 | Nancy Tartaglione
In a quiet section of the 16th arrondissement lives one of the most enduring figures of American cinema. Olivia de Havilland has owned her three-story house near the Bois de Boulogne since 1956, when she succumbed to the charms of a Frenchman and decided to get some distance from Hollywood. However, at 86, the star of such classics as "Gone With the Wind," "The Heiress," "To Each His Own" and "The Snake Pit" is hardly a shrinking violet. The actress hasn't slowed down much and sparkles when recounting the past.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1985
In the Hollywood Reporter, Robert Osborne, on the casting of Olivia de Havilland in "North and South: Book II"--"And typical of De Havilland's attention to detail and research as an actress . . . she's arriving in town early so she can watch a tape of all 12 hours of that first 'North and South.' . . ." And no doubt poring over the ABC press releases, too.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|