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Ollanta Humala

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WORLD
June 6, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Ollanta Humala, a leftist former army officer, claimed victory late Sunday in Peru's tense and divisive presidential election after partial returns showed him defeating the daughter of a disgraced former ruler. "We've won the election," Humala told a roaring crowd in Lima's Dos de Mayo Plaza. "We will form a democratic government open to civil society. " Humala, a nationalist promising better distribution of Peru's considerable wealth, had held a lead of about 2 to 3 percentage points over Keiko Fujimori, according to an earlier "quick count" of votes conducted by three polling firms and the advocacy group Transparencia.
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WORLD
June 15, 2011 | By Andres D'Alessandro and Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
  Peruvian President-elect Ollanta Humala, confronted Tuesday with canceled flights due to the ash cloud from Chile's Puyehue volcano, resorted to traveling by boat instead of airplane to keep an appointment with Argentine PresidentCristina Fernandez de Kirchner. A day earlier, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, also eager to meet with Fernandez, caught a bus for the 400-mile ride from Cordoba, Argentina, to Buenos Aires. His flight from Bogota, the Colombian capital, had been forced to land before reaching the Argentine capital because of Puyehue.
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WORLD
April 2, 2006 | Patrick J. McDonnell, Times Staff Writer
She is a conservative lawmaker vying to become Peru's first female president. He is an ex-army officer whose fiery nationalist rhetoric and kinship with leftist Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez have set off alarms in Washington. She calls a prospective free trade accord with the United States "a magnificent opportunity"; he is wary and regularly lambastes what he calls greedy transnational firms' devouring of the national bounty.
WORLD
June 7, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
The narrow victory of leftist nationalist Ollanta Humala in Peru's contentious presidential election triggered serious jitters throughout the Peruvian stock market and business establishment Monday but also words of conciliation from some of the president-elect's most implacable enemies. By a thin margin in Sunday's vote, Humala defeated Keiko Fujimori, a conservative 36-year-old lawmaker who is the daughter of Peru's disgraced former President Alberto Fujimori. The elder Fujimori is serving a 25-year jail sentence for corruption and authorizing death squads.
OPINION
April 15, 2011
Peru's political system has been ailing for decades. Corruption, violence and deep economic inequalities have left it weakened. Now, the first round of voting in the presidential race, which took place Sunday, threatens to leave the country in critical condition. From a field of five candidates, two emerged as front-runners likely to move on to a runoff election June 5. Both appear wanting in experience, and concerns about their commitment to democracy prompted Peruvian writer and Nobel Prize winner Mario Vargas Llosa to say the decision will be like "choosing between AIDS and terminal cancer.
WORLD
June 7, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
The narrow victory of leftist nationalist Ollanta Humala in Peru's contentious presidential election triggered serious jitters throughout the Peruvian stock market and business establishment Monday but also words of conciliation from some of the president-elect's most implacable enemies. By a thin margin in Sunday's vote, Humala defeated Keiko Fujimori, a conservative 36-year-old lawmaker who is the daughter of Peru's disgraced former President Alberto Fujimori. The elder Fujimori is serving a 25-year jail sentence for corruption and authorizing death squads.
WORLD
April 11, 2011 | By Adriana Leon and Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
After surging in the polls in the campaign's final weeks, retired army officer and populist Ollanta Humala appeared to lead Peru's presidential race Sunday but was likely to face a runoff in June. With about 43% of the votes counted Sunday night, Peru's electoral commission and unofficial tallies put Humala ahead of his closest competitors, Keiko Fujimori, a former congresswoman and daughter of imprisoned former President Alberto Fujimori, and Pedro Pablo Kuczynski, a former economy and finance minister.
WORLD
June 2, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
He could be a character in one of his novels, a doomed figure swiping at the structures of power. Nobel laureate Mario Vargas Llosa has waded into the stormy waters of his home country's election politics, again, and he seems to be at war with everyone. In the latest skirmish, the acclaimed Peruvian novelist this week angrily withdrew his columns from Lima's leading daily newspaper, El Comercio. He did so with some rather scathing words. El Comercio, he said, has become a "propaganda machine" for Keiko Fujimori, a controversial candidate in Sunday's presidential runoff election.
WORLD
June 4, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Phantasms stalk Peru's presidential runoff election. There's the ghost of Hugo Chavez, the radical Venezuelan president who haunts Peruvians who are fearful that he is the model that candidate Ollanta Humala plans to follow. There's the ghost of Alberto Fujimori, the jailed, disgraced former president whose daughter, Keiko, is the other candidate. Many fear she's just a proxy for him. There are ghosts from a war that killed 70,000 people and from a virtual dictatorship that eviscerated many of Peru's democratic institutions.
WORLD
June 6, 2006 | Patrick J. McDonnell, Times Staff Writer
President-elect Alan Garcia declared Monday that the weekend vote here featured only one loser: "Someone who doesn't even carry Peruvian identification." That would be Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, whose protege, Ollanta Humala, was beaten decisively in Sunday's runoff with Garcia. There is little question among those who have followed the election that Chavez's strong backing of Humala, and vocal heckling of Garcia and President Alejandro Toledo, backfired at the ballot box. U.S.
WORLD
June 6, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Ollanta Humala, a leftist former army officer, claimed victory late Sunday in Peru's tense and divisive presidential election after partial returns showed him defeating the daughter of a disgraced former ruler. "We've won the election," Humala told a roaring crowd in Lima's Dos de Mayo Plaza. "We will form a democratic government open to civil society. " Humala, a nationalist promising better distribution of Peru's considerable wealth, had held a lead of about 2 to 3 percentage points over Keiko Fujimori, according to an earlier "quick count" of votes conducted by three polling firms and the advocacy group Transparencia.
WORLD
June 4, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Phantasms stalk Peru's presidential runoff election. There's the ghost of Hugo Chavez, the radical Venezuelan president who haunts Peruvians who are fearful that he is the model that candidate Ollanta Humala plans to follow. There's the ghost of Alberto Fujimori, the jailed, disgraced former president whose daughter, Keiko, is the other candidate. Many fear she's just a proxy for him. There are ghosts from a war that killed 70,000 people and from a virtual dictatorship that eviscerated many of Peru's democratic institutions.
WORLD
June 2, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
He could be a character in one of his novels, a doomed figure swiping at the structures of power. Nobel laureate Mario Vargas Llosa has waded into the stormy waters of his home country's election politics, again, and he seems to be at war with everyone. In the latest skirmish, the acclaimed Peruvian novelist this week angrily withdrew his columns from Lima's leading daily newspaper, El Comercio. He did so with some rather scathing words. El Comercio, he said, has become a "propaganda machine" for Keiko Fujimori, a controversial candidate in Sunday's presidential runoff election.
OPINION
April 15, 2011
Peru's political system has been ailing for decades. Corruption, violence and deep economic inequalities have left it weakened. Now, the first round of voting in the presidential race, which took place Sunday, threatens to leave the country in critical condition. From a field of five candidates, two emerged as front-runners likely to move on to a runoff election June 5. Both appear wanting in experience, and concerns about their commitment to democracy prompted Peruvian writer and Nobel Prize winner Mario Vargas Llosa to say the decision will be like "choosing between AIDS and terminal cancer.
WORLD
April 11, 2011 | By Adriana Leon and Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
After surging in the polls in the campaign's final weeks, retired army officer and populist Ollanta Humala appeared to lead Peru's presidential race Sunday but was likely to face a runoff in June. With about 43% of the votes counted Sunday night, Peru's electoral commission and unofficial tallies put Humala ahead of his closest competitors, Keiko Fujimori, a former congresswoman and daughter of imprisoned former President Alberto Fujimori, and Pedro Pablo Kuczynski, a former economy and finance minister.
WORLD
June 6, 2006 | Patrick J. McDonnell, Times Staff Writer
President-elect Alan Garcia declared Monday that the weekend vote here featured only one loser: "Someone who doesn't even carry Peruvian identification." That would be Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, whose protege, Ollanta Humala, was beaten decisively in Sunday's runoff with Garcia. There is little question among those who have followed the election that Chavez's strong backing of Humala, and vocal heckling of Garcia and President Alejandro Toledo, backfired at the ballot box. U.S.
WORLD
June 5, 2006 | Patrick J. McDonnell, Times Staff Writer
Former President Alan Garcia returned to the presidency here after a runoff election that was painted as a rebuke of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez. An official count of more than 77% of the ballots gave Garcia 55.4% of the vote, compared with 44.5% for his opponent, ex-army officer Ollanta Humala, authorities said late Sunday. The head of Peru's electoral agency called the lead insurmountable. Venezuela's Chavez, South America's chief critic of the U.S.
WORLD
April 10, 2006 | Patrick J. McDonnell, Times Staff Writer
An ex-Army officer whose populist rhetoric and kinship with Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez worry the Bush administration held a slim lead in the presidential race Sunday, but will probably face a runoff, according to early returns. Ollanta Humala, 43, a political neophyte facing allegations of human rights abuses from his time as an army commander during Peru's 1990s guerrilla conflict, received about 27.3% of the vote with just less than half of the votes counted, election officials said.
WORLD
June 5, 2006 | Patrick J. McDonnell, Times Staff Writer
Former President Alan Garcia returned to the presidency here after a runoff election that was painted as a rebuke of Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez. An official count of more than 77% of the ballots gave Garcia 55.4% of the vote, compared with 44.5% for his opponent, ex-army officer Ollanta Humala, authorities said late Sunday. The head of Peru's electoral agency called the lead insurmountable. Venezuela's Chavez, South America's chief critic of the U.S.
WORLD
April 10, 2006 | Patrick J. McDonnell, Times Staff Writer
An ex-Army officer whose populist rhetoric and kinship with Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez worry the Bush administration held a slim lead in the presidential race Sunday, but will probably face a runoff, according to early returns. Ollanta Humala, 43, a political neophyte facing allegations of human rights abuses from his time as an army commander during Peru's 1990s guerrilla conflict, received about 27.3% of the vote with just less than half of the votes counted, election officials said.
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