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September 10, 1987 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
Promising, if inauspicious, debuts were the order of the evening at Hollywood Bowl on Tuesday night, when the Los Angeles Philharmonic opened its 10th and final week of the 1987 summer season in Cahuenga Pass. Making first appearances with the orchestra were young American conductor Hugh Wolff and the 20-year-old Olli Mustonen, a pianist and composer from Finland.
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October 21, 1999 | DAVID MERMELSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Olli Mustonen, the 32-year-old Finnish pianist, reckons that he was 13 when he first heard the music of Russian composer Rodion Shchedrin, whose Fifth Piano Concerto he premieres tonight with the Los Angeles Philharmonic under Esa-Pekka Salonen's baton. "From the first, I liked Shchedrin's original mind," said Mustonen via telephone from France. "But I didn't actually play any of his work until more recently."
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Fourteen conductors will occupy the music director-less podium of the Los Angeles Philharmonic during the 1989-90 season being announced today. Some of them--former music director Andre Previn, current principal guest conductor Simon Rattle, Erich Leinsdorf, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Kurt Sanderling and Vladimir Ashkenazy--are familiar faces and known quantities. Others--Gennady Rozhdestvensky, David Zinman and Andrew Litton, for example--are less well known to us. And three of them will be making L.A. Philharmonic debuts in a season when every new podium personality will be scrutinized as a candidate to replace Previn.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Fourteen conductors will occupy the music director-less podium of the Los Angeles Philharmonic during the 1989-90 season being announced today. Some of them--former music director Andre Previn, current principal guest conductor Simon Rattle, Erich Leinsdorf, Esa-Pekka Salonen, Kurt Sanderling and Vladimir Ashkenazy--are familiar faces and known quantities. Others--Gennady Rozhdestvensky, David Zinman and Andrew Litton, for example--are less well known to us. And three of them will be making L.A. Philharmonic debuts in a season when every new podium personality will be scrutinized as a candidate to replace Previn.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1999 | DAVID MERMELSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Olli Mustonen, the 32-year-old Finnish pianist, reckons that he was 13 when he first heard the music of Russian composer Rodion Shchedrin, whose Fifth Piano Concerto he premieres tonight with the Los Angeles Philharmonic under Esa-Pekka Salonen's baton. "From the first, I liked Shchedrin's original mind," said Mustonen via telephone from France. "But I didn't actually play any of his work until more recently."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1999
The Ojai Music Festival begins Wednesday and ends next Sunday, with concerts, art exhibits (contemporary Finnish glass and ceramics) and other events. (805) 646-2053. Wednesday, 5:30 p.m., Ojai Art Center The Toimii Ensemble presents works by Oliver Knussen (world premiere), Lindberg and Schwitters. Friday, 8 p.m. The Los Angeles Philharmonic, conducted by Salonen, with Laura Claycomb (soprano) and Anssi Kartunnen (cello), presents works by Salonen (U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1988 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
Dvorak's Eighth Symphony, for decades a specialty of the Los Angeles Philharmonic--especially in the halcyon days of Zubin Mehta's early tenure with the orchestra--made a remarkable impact when Leonard Slatkin conducted the Philharmonic Thursday night at Hollywood Bowl. The familiar piece achieved this impact through the most natural and undevious of means: an uncomplicated girding of the work's structure, clear instrumental balances, an aggressive and direct approach to songfulness.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2003 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
The Los Angeles Philharmonic's Shostakovich project is surfacing again, wheeling around to some of the mightier symphonic canvases. The Symphony No. 4 is the road not taken for Shostakovich, a monumental sign of where his youthful radicalism was headed until Stalin cracked down. It bursts with wild ideas welded loosely together in a buckling one-hour structure, right down to an extraordinary, hopelessly desolate coda.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1993 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Provocative programs--even at the Hollywood Bowl--are what we have come to expect from Esa-Pekka Salonen, the Los Angeles Philharmonic's music director now in the midst of a fortnight's visit to the outdoor showplace where his orchestra spends the summer. And provocative programs are what we are getting, at least this week at the Bowl.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1990 | KENNETH HERMAN
American symphony audiences have always shown a strong predilection for Russian music. When New Yorkers inaugurated Carnegie Hall in 1891, they brought over Tchaikovsky for a week of concerts. Sergei Rachmaninoff wrote his Third Piano Concerto in 1909 for an American tour, giving the eager Russophiles of New York City the first hearing of his new concerto.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1987 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
Promising, if inauspicious, debuts were the order of the evening at Hollywood Bowl on Tuesday night, when the Los Angeles Philharmonic opened its 10th and final week of the 1987 summer season in Cahuenga Pass. Making first appearances with the orchestra were young American conductor Hugh Wolff and the 20-year-old Olli Mustonen, a pianist and composer from Finland.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA
It is a truism, but one that bears repeating: Putting together a program of masterpieces doesn't necessarily ensure success. For instance: Bruno Weil, making his West Coast debut with the Los Angeles Philharmonic this week, arranged a wonderful agenda that could have thrilled the faithful and proved attractive to inexperienced concert-goers. It is a handsome and cogent Mozart program consisting of the Overture to "Don Giovanni," the Piano Concerto in E-flat, K. 271, and the "Linz" Symphony.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1994 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Esa-Pekka Salonen closed his four-program Hollywood Bowl visit this summer the same way he closed his portion of the Los Angeles Philharmonic's spring season in May--with a two-work program offering elegant brevity in the first half, followed by an early intermission and the swollen rhetoric of Anton Bruckner's Third Symphony in the post-interval.
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