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January 27, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A 2,500-year-old city influenced by the Olmecs -- often referred to as the "mother culture" of Mesoamerica -- has been discovered in Mexico, hundreds of miles away from the Olmecs' Gulf Coast territory, archeologists said Wednesday. Two statues and architectural details at the site, known as Zazacatla, indicate that the inhabitants adopted Olmec styles when they changed from a simple, egalitarian society to a more complex, hierarchical one.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2010
Olmec civilization emerged roughly 3,000 years ago in the eastern lowlands along Mexico's Gulf Coast in what is today the region of Veracruz and Tabasco. In many ways, it provided the foundation for all Mesoamerican art, much the way ancient Greek art did for subsequent European culture. Still, Olmec society today remains very much a mystery. For example, no one is quite sure what the monumental, 10-ton stone sculptures of helmeted human heads were used for -- although it is certain that anybody who came upon one at a time when the wheel was not yet in use and carving implements were rudimentary would know he was in the jaw-dropping presence of extraordinary power.
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TRAVEL
April 30, 2000 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER, Barbara Hansen is a staff writer in The Times' Food section
Perhaps I should have flown into Catemaco on a broomstick rather than arriving by bus. This town in the southeastern part of Veracruz state is renowned for its annual gathering of brujos (witches) on the first Friday of March. They were gone when I arrived a week and a half later, but Catemaco capitalizes on witchery all year. Stalls sell T-shirts printed with Halloween-style witches, pointed hats and all.
SCIENCE
January 27, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A 2,500-year-old city influenced by the Olmecs -- often referred to as the "mother culture" of Mesoamerica -- has been discovered in Mexico, hundreds of miles away from the Olmecs' Gulf Coast territory, archeologists said Wednesday. Two statues and architectural details at the site, known as Zazacatla, indicate that the inhabitants adopted Olmec styles when they changed from a simple, egalitarian society to a more complex, hierarchical one.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2010
Olmec civilization emerged roughly 3,000 years ago in the eastern lowlands along Mexico's Gulf Coast in what is today the region of Veracruz and Tabasco. In many ways, it provided the foundation for all Mesoamerican art, much the way ancient Greek art did for subsequent European culture. Still, Olmec society today remains very much a mystery. For example, no one is quite sure what the monumental, 10-ton stone sculptures of helmeted human heads were used for -- although it is certain that anybody who came upon one at a time when the wheel was not yet in use and carving implements were rudimentary would know he was in the jaw-dropping presence of extraordinary power.
SCIENCE
May 13, 2006 | From Reuters
A carved monolith unearthed in Mexico may show that the Olmec civilization, one of the oldest in the Americas, was more widespread than thought or that another culture thrived alongside it 3,000 years ago. Findings at the newly excavated Tamtoc archeological site in the north-central state of San Luis Potosi may prompt some scholars to rethink whether Mesoamerica's earliest peoples were based in southern Mexico.
TRAVEL
July 7, 1996
The first comprehensive exhibition of Olmec art, now on display at the National Gallery of Art in Washington through Oct. 20, provides a look at Mexico's earliest and least-known civilization. The 122 objects in the exhibit were created in Mexico and Central America 3,000 years ago, long before the Mayans or Aztecs. One of the carvings is a huge andesite sculpture known as Colossal Head 8, the portrait of a ruler of an Olmec capital in the Gulf Coast lowlands of Mexico.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2001
Marion Illig Stirling Pugh, 89, a Smithsonian secretary who married her archeologist boss and with him studied the ancient Olmec civilization of Middle America, died April 24 in Tucson. The young woman took night classes in anthropology, geology and Russian while working for Matthew W. Stirling, and learned archeology after marrying him in 1933. She became, he said, his "co-explorer, co-author and general coordinator" on expeditions to Mexico, Panama, Ecuador and Costa Rica beginning in 1938.
NEWS
May 4, 1986 | --Compiled from staff and wire service reports
Archeologists digging in Copalillo, Mexico, in the remote mountains southwest of Cuernavaca, have unearthed the earliest stone buildings found so far on the North American continent, along with a monumental carved stone head. Confirmed dates for the site, built by the ancient Olmec civilization, are 600 BC to 1200 BC, with preliminary laboratory testing of organic remains indicating dates going back as far as 1400 BC--roughly the time of Tutankhamen in Egypt.
SCIENCE
November 15, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Human bones believed to date from the ancient Olmec civilization have been found in southeastern Honduras, suggesting that the influential culture extended farther than previously thought, Honduran authorities said. Carmen Fajardo at the Honduran Institute of Anthropology and History said the bones appeared to be the first Olmec remains found outside the so-called Mesoamerican corridor, which stretches from Mexico to central Honduras.
SCIENCE
September 15, 2006 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Archeologists working on the gulf coast of Mexico have uncovered a 3,000-year-old stone tablet that bears the oldest writing in the Western Hemisphere and the first text unambiguously linked to the Olmec empire -- the enigmatic civilization believed to be the progenitor of the Aztecs and Maya. The 26-pound tablet, about the size of a legal pad, bears 62 symbols arrayed in a manner suggesting an organized text. "We have long thought that the Olmec would have writing," said archeologist William A.
SCIENCE
May 13, 2006 | From Reuters
A carved monolith unearthed in Mexico may show that the Olmec civilization, one of the oldest in the Americas, was more widespread than thought or that another culture thrived alongside it 3,000 years ago. Findings at the newly excavated Tamtoc archeological site in the north-central state of San Luis Potosi may prompt some scholars to rethink whether Mesoamerica's earliest peoples were based in southern Mexico.
SCIENCE
August 2, 2005 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Analysis of 3,000-year-old pottery shards from the ancient Olmec capital of San Lorenzo and other sites contradicts the notion among some researchers that the Olmec civilization was the "mother culture" that laid the foundation for the Inca, Maya and other civilizations of Central and South America. Many researchers believe that the Olmec were the primary culture of the region, dominating, inspiring and ultimately raising the other chiefdoms to the level of civilization.
SCIENCE
November 15, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Human bones believed to date from the ancient Olmec civilization have been found in southeastern Honduras, suggesting that the influential culture extended farther than previously thought, Honduran authorities said. Carmen Fajardo at the Honduran Institute of Anthropology and History said the bones appeared to be the first Olmec remains found outside the so-called Mesoamerican corridor, which stretches from Mexico to central Honduras.
SCIENCE
December 6, 2002 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Archeologists digging near Mexico's Gulf Coast have discovered the earliest-known example of writing in Mesoamerica, pushing the date for the appearance of this cultural breakthrough back by at least 450 years, to about 650 BC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2001
Marion Illig Stirling Pugh, 89, a Smithsonian secretary who married her archeologist boss and with him studied the ancient Olmec civilization of Middle America, died April 24 in Tucson. The young woman took night classes in anthropology, geology and Russian while working for Matthew W. Stirling, and learned archeology after marrying him in 1933. She became, he said, his "co-explorer, co-author and general coordinator" on expeditions to Mexico, Panama, Ecuador and Costa Rica beginning in 1938.
TRAVEL
March 29, 1987 | CECIL SMITH, Smith is former TV critic of The Times.
We had come down from the mountain city of San Cristobal de las Casas on its 7,500-foot plateau near the Guatemala border. Here the Indians, descendants of the ancient Zapotecs, walk the streets barelegged and barefoot in their red cotton ponchos and broad-brimmed straw hats adorned with tassels and ribbons, and the women sell beautifully woven woolens in the church square. We were heading for the seacoast resorts, notably Puerto Escondido, to bake out some of the mountain chill.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 1992 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amalia Hernandez, 75, eases carefully into a chair, settling down to discuss Ballet Folklorico de Mexico, the internationally renowned troupe she founded 40 years ago and still runs. She's a woman of great beauty, but time has nonetheless softened her commanding profile and slowed her stride. Retirement, however, is unthinkable. Heaven will have to take her first, she says.
TRAVEL
April 30, 2000 | BARBARA HANSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER, Barbara Hansen is a staff writer in The Times' Food section
Perhaps I should have flown into Catemaco on a broomstick rather than arriving by bus. This town in the southeastern part of Veracruz state is renowned for its annual gathering of brujos (witches) on the first Friday of March. They were gone when I arrived a week and a half later, but Catemaco capitalizes on witchery all year. Stalls sell T-shirts printed with Halloween-style witches, pointed hats and all.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1999 | ISAAC A. LEVI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
With a real estate development in the works, archeologists are fighting for a chance to study a site they say could provide clues to the fate of a famous ancient culture along the Gulf of Mexico. The site--now just a cluster of dirt-covered mounds called El Dorado--is in the 200-acre Mandinga mangrove swamp along the Jamapa River, just 13 miles south of the port of Veracruz.
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