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Olympic Games 1932

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SPORTS
July 23, 1992 | JIM MURRAY
An Olympics is like no other sporting event in the world. It used to be a sleepy little series of track meets as immortalized in the film, "Chariots of Fire." The competition was pretty much restricted to the sons of riches from places such as Oxford, the Sorbonne, Heidelberg, Yale and Princeton, undergraduates for whom pater could afford the considerable travel expense. Nobody made any money off Olympic Games. It was considered declasse to do so. Los Angeles twice saved the Games.
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SPORTS
July 23, 1992 | JIM MURRAY
An Olympics is like no other sporting event in the world. It used to be a sleepy little series of track meets as immortalized in the film, "Chariots of Fire." The competition was pretty much restricted to the sons of riches from places such as Oxford, the Sorbonne, Heidelberg, Yale and Princeton, undergraduates for whom pater could afford the considerable travel expense. Nobody made any money off Olympic Games. It was considered declasse to do so. Los Angeles twice saved the Games.
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NEWS
April 2, 2011
Times reader "EdUrias1" shot this photo of Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum before a football game between USC and Notre Dame. L.A. Coliseum has been home to the USC Trojans since 1923, when the stadium made its debut. That year, USC beat Pomona College 23 to 7. The facility also hosted the Summer Olympic Games in 1932 and 1984. View past photos we've featured . To upload your own, visit our reader travel photo gallery . When you upload your photo, tell us where it was taken and when.
SPORTS
October 23, 1997 | SHAV GLICK
When the Minneapolis Lakers moved to Los Angeles in 1960, few could understand why the team retained the name Lakers when there weren't any lakes around. Now people are wondering why Tennessee's NFL team still calls itself the Oilers after moving from oil-rich Houston. Owner Bud Adams has the answer. The Oilers were named in honor of his grandfather, who drilled the first commercial oil well, and his father, a former president of Phillips Petroleum.
SPORTS
April 30, 1990 | MAL FLORENCE
Parry O'Brien was reminiscing recently about the Coliseum, which was once the citadel for track and field in the United States. "I remember training there at night by the light of the Olympic torch at the peristyle entrance in the Olympic year of 1952," O'Brien said. "It provided a great deal of inspiration." O'Brien, the former USC star, was a gold medalist in the shotput in 1952 and again in 1956.
NEWS
January 29, 1994 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 70-year-old Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum suffered more damage than any other public facility in the Jan. 17 earthquake, an estimated $35-million loss that has closed the historic stadium until its operators can find the money to make repairs, officials said Friday.
NEWS
January 5, 1993 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
William H. (Bill) Nicholas, who guided the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum through its greatest period of growth and then presided over the birth of the adjacent Sports Arena, has died. Nicholas, who retired in 1973 after 27 years as general manager, was 85 when he died Wednesday in a Pasadena hospital of a stroke. The Coliseum complex he left behind nearly 20 years ago bore little resemblance to the one he took over in 1946.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2002 | DAVE McKIBBEN and LIZ F. KAY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When 18-year-old Evita LaVoie of Banning was picked to carry the Olympic flame through the streets of Laguna Beach, she wasn't sure she was worthy. "Compared to some of these other runners like the Marines, I thought, 'I didn't do anything to support our country,' " said LaVoie, a three-sport athlete at Banning High who nearly died in a car crash 10 years ago. After brain surgery, LaVoie had to teach herself to eat and walk again. "I figured I was just ordinary," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1992 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A plan to jump-start renovation of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum--to begin early next year with a lowering of the stadium floor and the addition of thousands of new seats near the field--is expected to be approved by the Coliseum Commission today. The plan, developed by a special committee of the commission, is unlike earlier, unsuccessful attempts to reconstruct the 70-year-old stadium with private financing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1993 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following years of scrapped plans and broken promises, a major renovation of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum is due to begin next month by the Tutor-Saliba Corp., which was selected Wednesday by the Coliseum Commission to undertake the estimated $15-million face lift. Initial plans call for the Coliseum floor to be lowered by 11 feet to enable the addition of 14 rows of seats.
NEWS
September 25, 1991 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An official proposal for renovation of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, unveiled Tuesday, raises a strong possibility that the University of Southern California football team will play its 1993 home games in Anaheim Stadium, officials said. The renovation would maintain many of the Coliseum's historic features and traditional sight lines while adding state-of-the-art luxury suites, club seating and a 19-row upper deck.
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