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Olympic Games 1976

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February 3, 1996 | WENDY WITHERSPOON and GREG SANDOVAL
Benjamin "Benny" Brown, a gold-medal winner in the 1976 Olympics in Montreal and former NCAA champion quarter-miler for UCLA, was killed in an automobile accident Thursday. He was 42. Brown, an assistant track coach at Cal State Fullerton the last eight years, was on his way to pick up his son from school in Ontario when he lost control of his car and struck a light pole, a family friend said Friday. He was a member of three NCAA champion mile relay teams, in 1973, 1974 and 1975.
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February 3, 1996 | WENDY WITHERSPOON and GREG SANDOVAL
Benjamin "Benny" Brown, a gold-medal winner in the 1976 Olympics in Montreal and former NCAA champion quarter-miler for UCLA, was killed in an automobile accident Thursday. He was 42. Brown, an assistant track coach at Cal State Fullerton the last eight years, was on his way to pick up his son from school in Ontario when he lost control of his car and struck a light pole, a family friend said Friday. He was a member of three NCAA champion mile relay teams, in 1973, 1974 and 1975.
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SPORTS
December 21, 1986
John Walker of New Zealand, first man to run the mile under 3:50, will compete on the U. S. indoor tour this winter, starting with the 28th annual Sunkist Invitational on Friday night, Jan. 16, at the Sports Arena. Walker made track history when he ran the mile in 3:34.4 in Sweden in 1975. The 34-year old runner also won the gold medal in the 1,500-meter run at the Montreal Olympic Games in 1976.
SPORTS
March 27, 1993
In the misty hills at West Point, N.Y., above the Hudson River, a cold rain fell steadily on the small group of people who bore Pat Nappi to his grave. It was a full military service. From a nearby hill, a bugler played. A volley was fired in tribute as the most successful Olympic boxing coach in U.S. history was lowered into the ground. Among those who watched from beneath umbrellas were family members, close friends and two representatives from amateur boxing, Col. Don Hull and Rolly Schwartz.
SPORTS
August 10, 2008 | Bill Dwyre, Greg Johnson, Edwin Moses
Highlights from The Times' "Ticket to Beijing" blog (at latimes.com/olympics): It won't exactly be Samson and Delilah, but a haircut of possibly Olympic proportions will be performed in the next few days in the athletes village. "I'll do it in one of the free barbershops," says Ben Askren, U.S. freestyle wrestler, who will compete Aug. 20 at 163 pounds. Others here are discussed as candidates to be the face of the Games. Askren had a chance to be the hair of the Games. But reality set in, in February at the World Cup, when Askren faced a Russian named Denis Tsargush.
SPORTS
November 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
Charles Lakes has gone from 19th to first before. He plans to do it again. To some degree, his three-year quest begins this weekend. Lakes, one of the few blacks competing in the predominantly white sport of gymnastics, held the No. 1 spot on the U.S. team in the 1988 Olympic Games, where he finished 19th. He is shooting for a gold medal in the 1992 Olympics at Barcelona, Spain. "I believe I can do it," Lakes said by telephone from his home in Newhall.
SPORTS
December 3, 1989 | From Associated Press
Charles Lakes has gone from 19th to first before. He plans to do it again. To some degree, his three-year quest begins this weekend. Lakes, one of the few blacks competing in the predominantly white sport of gymnastics, held the No. 1 spot on the U.S. team in the 1988 Olympic Games, where he finished 19th. He's shooting for a gold medal in the 1992 Olympics at Barcelona, Spain. "I believe I can do it," Lakes said by telephone from his home in nearby Newhall.
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February 13, 1990 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Billionaire developer Donald J. Trump announced Monday he will seek a divorce from his wife of 13 years, Ivana, and said under the terms of a prenuptial agreement she would receive $20 million to $25 million of his fortune--estimated at $1.7 billion. Mrs. Trump promptly disagreed, firing through her lawyer the first volleys of what could be a protracted and bitter court battle between her and her husband, the best-selling author of "The Art of the Deal."
SPORTS
April 16, 1992 | DOUG CRESS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The exhibits in the tiny Darder Natural History Museum here run from the grotesque to the bizarre. There is a stuffed calf with two heads, a baby pig with two mouths, an entire family of lions and a Great Dane that once belonged to the founder. Another room holds two tanned human skins--male and female--several shop-worn mummies and a row of glass jars containing human fetuses from one month to nine months old. And then there is El Negro.
SPORTS
September 13, 1988 | MAL FLORENCE, Times Staff Writer
When the Olympic Games begin Saturday in Seoul, there probably won't be many surprising performances among American men in track competition. The sprinters and hurdlers will get their share of medals, but the middle- and long-distance runners will be fortunate to get even one medal from the 1,500 meters through the marathon. It has been surmised that there is a decline in the quality and quantity of American milers, for example, since Jim Ryun competed in the 1960s.
SPORTS
April 18, 1989 | JULIE CART, Times Staff Writer
Out of the horn of Africa has emerged the most devastating and dominant group of marathon runners the world has seen. Or at least since the last time Ethiopia ventured from its athletic isolation and won three consecutive Olympic gold medals, putting its indelible stamp on the marathon. It appears to be happening again, a generation after Abebe Bikila ran barefoot through the darkened streets of Rome in 1960 to win the first of his two Olympic golds. Now it is Abebe Mekonnen, who was born the year Bikila won the 1964 Olympic Marathon in Tokyo and a nation named its baby boys after its hero.
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