Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOlympic Games 1988
IN THE NEWS

Olympic Games 1988

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
February 24, 1995 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Greg Louganis hit his head on the diving board and spilled his blood into the pool at the 1988 Olympic Games, did he have an obligation to disclose to doctors who treated him and to other athletes using the pool that he was HIV-positive?
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
April 23, 2003 | Alan Abrahamson, Times Staff Writer
Track stars Carl Lewis and Joe DeLoach, who won gold medals at the Seoul Olympics, tested positive before those 1988 Summer Games for trace amounts of stimulants commonly found in cold medicines, but under the rules in place then and now deserve to be cleared of any suggestion they used performance-enhancing substances, according to documents obtained by The Times.
Advertisement
SPORTS
September 17, 1988 | JULIE BERGMAN, Special to The Times
Two of the five members of the United States equestrian show jumping squad for the 1988 Olympics are West Coast natives, Anne Kursinski of Pasadena and Lisa Jacquin of Rancho Palos Verdes. That's a bit of an upset, considering the many competitive international show jumping riders that America's East Coast traditionally produces. But Jacquin and Kursinski have one more step to climb before their participation in the events is guaranteed. They have to prove to the U.S.
SPORTS
February 24, 1995 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Greg Louganis hit his head on the diving board and spilled his blood into the pool at the 1988 Olympic Games, did he have an obligation to disclose to doctors who treated him and to other athletes using the pool that he was HIV-positive?
SPORTS
September 5, 1988 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
Kelly Garrison-Steves is that rarest of things in women's gymnastics. She's a woman. On an Olympic team where three of the gymnasts are 15 and two others are 17, Garrison-Steves reigns as a kind of Grandma Moses. She's 21, a college junior and married. At that alone, she's quite a curiousity. After failing in two previous Olympic trials she probably should have been given an oldtimer's exemption for this one. She could chaperon.
SPORTS
August 24, 1988 | CURT HOLBREICH, Times Staff Writer
The story of Karch Kiraly begins with his father, whose own story is even better. That's not to say there is little interesting about the life of Karch Kiraly, acknowledged as the world's best volleyball player on the world's best volleyball team. It's just that even the younger Kiraly can't top the old man's journey. Becoming the best in the world at what you do is remarkable, but what Kiraly's father did in escaping the failed Hungarian revolt of 1956 at least bordered on the heroic.
SPORTS
March 3, 1989 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
In the 11 months after he broke the 100-meter world record at the World Championships at Rome in August, 1987, Ben Johnson used anabolic steroids during three different periods, his coach, Charlie Francis, said Thursday.
SPORTS
February 5, 1992 | MIKE REILLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scott Fortune entered Laguna Beach High School in 1980 as a reluctant volleyball player, participating in the sport only under the insistence of his mother. Four years later, Fortune had played for two Southern Section championship teams and wasbeing wooed by the top college programs. And by 1988, Fortune had an Olympic gold medal draped around his neck. Shortly after the Olympics, Fortune went to the Richard Henry Dana Elementary School in Dana Point, where his mother had been a teacher.
SPORTS
September 20, 1988 | TRACY DODDS, Times Staff Writer
Greg Louganis stood at the top of the awards stand, the Olympic gold medal for men's springboard diving around his neck, and listened as the Star Spangled Banner reverberated through the Chamshil Indoor Swimming Pool Tuesday afternoon. For his coach, Ron O'Brien, the last phrase of the anthem summed up the gold medal performance . . . and the home of the brave. O'Brien was not exaggerating for the sake of drama.
SPORTS
September 14, 1988 | From Associated Press
NBC said it was scrapping plans to show quarter-screen images of Olympic events during some commercials. "NBC will not combine Olympic coverage with commercials in split-screen format," a spokesman for the network said. NBC, concerned about the possibility of missing a crucial moment, approached some advertisers with the idea of showing, on "an occasional basis," continuing coverage of events in the lower right-hand corner of the screen while commercials aired.
SPORTS
February 24, 1995 | Mike Downey
He hugged a teddy bear. This was one of a great many things that separated Greg Louganis from your average athlete. On occasion during his time as the world's greatest diver, he would complete a successful splashdown, emerge from the aqua as triumphant as Neptune with his trident, towel himself dry, then clutch a small stuffed animal to his chest as judges tabulated his scores. More often than not, we saw Louganis literally come up smiling.
SPORTS
July 23, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ahn Jae Hyung, a South Korean who so excelled in Ping-Pong from his elementary school days that his family moved to Pusan to further his pursuit of the game, first glimpsed his true love on his initial trip overseas in 1984 to compete in a tournament in Pakistan. "Her quiet ways and her intense mood attracted me," Ahn said of Jiao Zhimin of China, who won medals in what was also her first overseas competition.
SPORTS
February 5, 1992 | MIKE REILLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scott Fortune entered Laguna Beach High School in 1980 as a reluctant volleyball player, participating in the sport only under the insistence of his mother. Four years later, Fortune had played for two Southern Section championship teams and wasbeing wooed by the top college programs. And by 1988, Fortune had an Olympic gold medal draped around his neck. Shortly after the Olympics, Fortune went to the Richard Henry Dana Elementary School in Dana Point, where his mother had been a teacher.
SPORTS
July 20, 1991
Of athletes who competed in the 1984 and 1988 Olympics, 73.6% had participated in U.S. Olympic Festivals. The following are percentages in selected sports: MOST Archery: 100% Diving: 100% Rhythmic Gymnastics: 100% Modern Pentathlon: 100% Synchronized Swimming: 100% LEAST Tennis: 0% Equestrian: 9% Yachting: 13% Swimming: 46% Speedskating: 41% Volleyball: 51% Basketball: 52%
SPORTS
July 14, 1991 | THERESA MUNOZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
LaTaunya Pollard's daughter already speaks Italian. Chiara is 3. No wonder Jennifer Azzi is envious. Azzi, the 1989 NCAA Division I female basketball player of the year, is still trying to master the language after her first season playing in the Italian League. Valerie Still has gone a couple of steps better. A singer, pianist and guitarist in the band Under 99, she has recorded two records and performed at a variety of Italian nightclubs.
SPORTS
December 5, 1990
Experts in East Germany developed a performance-enhancing nasal spray before the 1988 Olympic Games that had the same effect as anabolic steroids and was virtually undetectable, a leading swimmer alleged Tuesday. Raik Hannemann, who Monday admitted taking performance-enhancing drugs, said traces of the drug's use would disappear after three days.
SPORTS
May 24, 1988 | MARK HEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Behind windows covered over with adhesive tape, the world's last great amateur basketball team takes shape. In 1992, the United States is expected to send grown-up National Basketball Assn. professionals to the Olympics, and an era will be over. Remember young Bill Russell in Melbourne? The "greatest team ever" with The Big O and Jerry West in Rome? Spencer Haywood of Trinidad (Colo.) Junior College bailing out the United States in Mexico City when the big names stayed home?
SPORTS
September 27, 1988 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The stunning disqualification of Ben Johnson for having an anabolic steroid in his system should not have come as a surprise to Canadian sports officials. Jean Charest, the Canadian sports minister, said at a hurriedly called press conference in Ottawa that he had been warned on two occasions by private citizens that Johnson was using steroids. Charest said he dismissed those accusations as little more than rumors.
SPORTS
October 31, 1990 | From Associated Press
Former Olympic diver Bruce Kimball will serve less than five years of a 17-year sentence for a 1988 drunk-driving accident that killed two teen-agers, the Florida Parole Commission decided Tuesday. The commission voted to release Kimball Nov. 24, 1993, unless the case is brought back to the commission for disciplinary action by the Department of Corrections, parole spokeswoman Ruth Anne Reese said.
SPORTS
October 30, 1990 | ELLIOTT ALMOND and RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two years ago in Seoul, Korea, the Olympics suffered through its biggest drug scandal when Ben Johnson of Canada lost his gold medal after testing positive for an anabolic steroid. Rumors were rife in the Olympic village that other big-time athletes also tested positive, but none of those rumors were verified. Still, word of another potential scandal quietly reached the International Olympic Committee's medical commission in Seoul. It involved Stacey Augmon. Augmon, a guard for the U.S.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|