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Olympic Torch

SPORTS
April 12, 2008 | Ching-Ching Ni, Times Staff Writer
BEIJING -- A week of embarrassing global protests along the international Olympic torch relay has fanned Chinese nationalism at home and turned a 27-year-old disabled woman into a national hero. Jin Jing is a one-legged Chinese torchbearer who was attacked by protesters on the streets of Paris. Images of her in her wheelchair protecting the flame with her tiny body catapulted her to overnight fame in China as a symbol of the nation's effort to defend its place in the world. Businesses are throwing job offers at the unemployed former member of the Shanghai wheelchair fencing team.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2002 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jochen Tartak didn't sweat it Monday when he carried the Olympic flame across the desert and into California. After all, he had a police escort as he hit 70 mph at the state line. Tim Hoffman didn't sweat it, either, when he carried the Olympic torch down this mountain hamlet's main street at about 5 mph. He had two dozen kids ready to catch him if he stumbled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1996 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Runners from Los Angeles will soon get the Olympic flame started on its journey to the Summer Games in Atlanta. And in the city that taught the world 12 years ago how to sell the Olympics, the grand relay will be brought to you by Coca-Cola. By sponsoring the torch run, the beverage company bought the right to pick one-fourth of the 10,000 men and women who will carry the flame, and will do so from mail-in entries tucked into 12-packs of Coke.
WORLD
April 7, 2008 | Kim Murphy and Geraldine Baum, Times Staff Writers
The Olympic torch made its way under heavy police guard through 31 miles of raucous protests across London on Sunday, amid mounting calls for European leaders to boycott the opening ceremonies in Beijing to protest China's human rights record. With shouts of "Free Tibet!" and "Shame on China!" from the crowds, the torch occasionally had to be sheltered on a bus, while police scuffled with demonstrators who leaped in to try to halt the parade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2002 | STEVE CHAWKINS and FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Taking a break from jobs and school, thousands of jubilant Ventura County residents witnessed history on the hoof Wednesday as torchbearers holding aloft the Olympic flame wended their way through wildly cheering, flag-waving crowds. Lighted in Olympia, Greece, in November, the flame was flown to Atlanta, the site of the most recent Olympic Games in the United States. It has been transported to places as large as Los Angeles and as small as Hickory, N.C.
NEWS
July 8, 1993 | KIRBY LEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sonny Monioz has a knack for finding talent. The El Segundo resident has earned a living as a talent agent for the past 25 years. Monioz, 56, booked acts such as Ike and Tina Turner, Neal Diamond and Glenn Campbell during a stint as entertainment director at Cisco's nightclub in Manhattan Beach in the late 1960s.
NEWS
January 23, 2002 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cameras click when Stein Eriksen enters the room. Groupies surround him. Children beg for autographs. People--very, very wealthy people--plead for the privilege of paying quite dearly to spend an hour on the snow with him. "Ya," he says, sounding like he maybe left Oslo the day before yesterday, "this is very exciting." What the 74-year-old dean of American freestyle skiing is referring to is both the XIX Winter Olympics and the 50th anniversary of his own Olympic medals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1996
Forty-four more people from the Los Angeles area have been selected as torchbearers for the 1996 Olympic Torch Relay. "This is the final group of torchbearers to be named in Los Angeles," said Kimberly Goolsby of Atlanta-based Coca-Cola, which sponsored the "Who Would You Choose?" program. Each winner of that program picked someone special in his or her life to carry the torch, Goolsby said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1989 | JOHN KENDALL, Times Staff Writer
Hells Angel George (Gus) Christie Jr. said he is satisfied at last that mentally retarded children in Pottstown, Pa., will get the aid he intended when he raised $3,000 from fellow bikers and ran in the 1984 Olympic Torch Relay. Christie, 42, president of the Hells Angels in Ventura County, confirmed that a confidential settlement has been reached in a lawsuit he filed four years ago over how the money he raised should be distributed.
WORLD
February 6, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
SOCHI, Russia - Half a mile away, thousands of people waved flags, held balloons and cheered Thursday as the Olympic torch passed by. Nina Toromonyan stood in the gray rubble that remains of her home and cried. She recalled her elation in 2007 when her city was selected to host this year's Olympic Winter Games. She imagined that wonderful things were coming. She didn't think that riot police would throw 13 family members out of their three-story home to make way for a new highway two miles away.
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