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SPORTS
July 30, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
LONDON - Contrary to popular belief at these London Olympics, Kim Rhode did not fire a shot heard 'round the world Sunday. She fired 99. Our Annie Oakley from Monrovia, who entered Sunday's women's skeet competition amid as much attention on a U.S. shooter as there has been since Roy Rogers, demolished the field. Watching her perform at the Royal Artillery Barracks felt a little like the days when Tiger Woods got ahead in a golf tournament and the other guys became puddles around him. Rhode had come to these Olympics as a prominent member of the pre-show hype.
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SPORTS
August 5, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter, Los Angeles Times
LONDON - Go down five times in one round in professional boxing and your fight will be stopped. Go down five times in one round in the Olympics, and you go on to the quarterfinals. At least that's what happened - briefly - to Magomed Abdulhamidov of Azerbaijan who, judges ruled, won his bantamweight fight with Japan's Satoshi Shimizu despite being assessed a two-point penalty in a third round he spent mainly on the canvas. "I was shocked," Shimizu said. "I don't understand. " Neither does anyone else.
SPORTS
March 21, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter
There might be more at stake than simply a summer trip to London when the U.S. team opens play in the CONCACAF men's Olympic qualifying tournament Thursday in Nashville. Because with 14 of the 20 players on the American soccer squad coming from Major League Soccer teams, the eight-nation tournament can rightly be seen as a referendum on the progress of MLS as well. "It's a strong statement about our league and the development of young players that the Olympic tournament — a reflection of the strongest young players in each country — includes so many that are on our clubs," MLS spokesman Will Kuhn said.
SPORTS
August 1, 2012 | Staff reports
LONDON — The congratulatory telegram is so last century, the congratulatory phone call so last decade. When Michael Phelps awoke on Wednesday, he scrolled through his Twitter feed and discovered a congratulatory tweet from President Obama . "Congrats to Michael Phelps for breaking the all-time Olympic medal record," Obama tweeted. "You've made your country proud. -bo" Phelps tweeted back: "Thank you Mr. President!! It's an honor representing the #USA !! The best country in the world!
SPORTS
October 6, 2011 | By Helene Elliott
Stroking through the water confidently and surely was as satisfying as Janet Evans remembered. So was the pure joy of getting her body to obey her mind. But soon after the five-time Olympic medalist began training for a return to competitive swimming she was reminded of aspects of athletic life that had — mercifully — slipped her mind. "I'd forgotten how cold pools can be at 4:45 in the morning," she said. "I'm always the last person in the water. " Then there was the night officials of the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency arrived on her Laguna Beach doorstep around 10 o'clock to collect a urine sample for drug testing.
SPORTS
August 6, 2012 | Bill Plaschke
LONDON -- The Olympian without a country is not without a budget. Guor Marial shows up for an interview at the Olympic village dressed in jeans and a polo shirt purchased from Target. He trains in old gear from Iowa State University. He will run the marathon Sunday in shoes purchased online. "If you want the really good shoes, the ones you can use for the Olympics," he says, "I can get those for a hundred bucks. " The Olympian without a country is not without feelings. Guor Marial has painfully felt the differences while wandering through the first week of these Olympics without any national logo on his sweats, without teammates at his side during training, and without any real buddies except an advisor who serves as his coach, sports committee and roommate.
SPORTS
June 5, 2012 | Bill Dwyre
The rain drizzled and the air chilled on that dreary night of Aug. 21, 2008, in Beijing. It was the end of something that had had such a nice beginning. It was a night when sadness was understandable, even while a group of Japanese women deliriously celebrated what they had just achieved. Through the mist and gloom, Don Porter saw the glass half full, as usual. In sports significance and popularity, what happened on this Olympian night didn't even make the scale of 1 to 10. This wasn't about a dream team, just a dream.
SPORTS
June 25, 2012 | By Helene Elliott, Los Angeles Times
EUGENE, Ore. - Jenn Suhr's pole vaulting career has taken off since she won the silver medal at the 2008 Beijing Olympics, but her training situation remains grounded. Suhr, known as Jenn Stuczynski before she married her coach, Rick Suhr , still trains in a cramped airplane hangar behind her home near Rochester, N.Y. Suhr has come close to hitting the hangar's ceiling in practice several times, but she didn't have to soar quite that high at Hayward Field on Sunday to triumph at the U.S. Olympic track and field trials and win a berth at the London Games.
SPORTS
May 23, 2011 | Helene Elliott
Kim Rhode isn't easily rattled. She competed against adults at 13 to win her first world title in the shooting sport of American skeet. She won an Olympic gold medal in double trap at the 1996 Atlanta Games five days after her 17th birthday, the youngest female Olympic shooting champion in the Games' history, and returned to win bronze in 2000 and gold again in 2004. When women's double trap was dropped from the Olympics, she switched to skeet and virtually started over. All she did was set a world record in her first World Cup event and win a silver medal at the 2008 Beijing Games.
SPORTS
April 26, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter
WAKEFIELD, Mass. — For more than a year, the guilt and shame overwhelmed Kayla Harrison, even though she had done nothing wrong. "I can't describe how I felt," she says quietly. "I think I cried pretty much every night. " She also thought about suicide — even tried to run away from home once. Then she decided to stand and fight. Sexually abused by her judo coach for three years as a teenager, Harrison did what few in her position ever find the courage to do: confront her attacker in court.
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