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October 27, 1985 | United Press International
The massacre of 11 Israeli athletes by Arab terrorists during the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich made a lasting impression on the only former Olympian in Congress. In the 13 years since, Sen. Bill Bradley, D-N.J., a member of the 1964 gold-medal winning basketball team, has been on something of a personal mission to rid the Games of politics. And the solution he has come up with, and has put before the Senate, is a measure urging the selection of a permanent site for the Olympics.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic, This post has been corrected. See note below.
Even if you don't know a halfpipe from a flying camel there are many reasons to watch the Winter Olympics: Johnny Weir's mink, the sight of actual reindeer, the most in-depth ice crystal analysis since "Smilla's Sense of Snow. " Here's the best one though: No thigh gaps. FOR THE RECORD: Women in the Olympics: A critic's notebook on the beauty of muscular women athletes in the Sochi Games in the Feb. 22 Calendar section referred to professional women's basketball as the WBA. It is the WNBA.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic, This post has been corrected. See note below.
Even if you don't know a halfpipe from a flying camel there are many reasons to watch the Winter Olympics: Johnny Weir's mink, the sight of actual reindeer, the most in-depth ice crystal analysis since "Smilla's Sense of Snow. " Here's the best one though: No thigh gaps. FOR THE RECORD: Women in the Olympics: A critic's notebook on the beauty of muscular women athletes in the Sochi Games in the Feb. 22 Calendar section referred to professional women's basketball as the WBA. It is the WNBA.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2014 | By Meg James
The lighting of the Olympic flame in Russia will launch a nearly $900-million bet by U.S. advertisers that this year's Winter Games will become a feel-good event for television audiences. Leading up to Friday's official opening of the XXII Olympic Winter Games, most of the attention has centered on difficulties - and not the athletes. The Sochi athletic competitions will be unfolding against a backdrop of threats of terrorist attacks, allegations of corruption, tense U.S.-Russia relations and protests over Russia's controversial anti-gay laws.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1988
Yes, the Olympics Games coverage on TV is lousy. The reason NBC has done so poorly is twofold: Some NBC hotshots in their infinite wisdom decided the Olympics was not really a sport, it was news . That's why there has been so little actual sports coverage and so much time spent looking for, making or rehashing controversies. And if all else fails, interview other newscasters. Different NBC executives decided the Olympics was entertainment and have pushed what I call the "Pierre Salinger Syndrome."
NEWS
February 12, 2010
'Let There Be Light': An article in Sunday's Calendar quoted director Martin Scorsese saying that the World War II documentary "Let There Be Light," commissioned by the U.S. Army, "was banned. I don't think that ban has ever been lifted." The film was declassified in 1980. Olympics on NBC: An article in Business on Thursday about NBC's broadcast of the Winter Olympics said NBC Universal's bid for the television rights to the 2010 and 2012 Olympics Games was $900 million more than the next-highest bidder, Rupert Murdoch's Fox network.
NEWS
July 28, 1985 | TOM HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
For those who predicted that team handball would rise from obscurity to become a popular sport following the 1984 Olympics Games, guess again. First, there was Peter Ueberroth, Los Angeles Olympic Organizing Committee President, who predicted that team handball would be "the sleeper sport" of the '84 Games. He reasoned that the fast-paced, high-scoring game would be perfectly suited for American fans. Next, there were the followers of the sport, who hoped that TV exposure and some patriotic victories would enlighten the American public and set off a wave of team handball mania.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1999 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cable customers will be able to watch more Olympics coverage than ever before and see high-definition TV programming without a special TV set under a sweeping agreement Thursday between AT&T and NBC that could set the stage for other similar pacts between broadcasters and cable operators.
SPORTS
March 9, 1986 | JOHN COTTER, Reuters
Dieudonne Lamothe finished an embarrassing last in the 1984 Olympic marathon, but no one knew he was running for his life--in borrowed shoes. The Los Angeles crowd cheered politely as the Haitian staggered across the finish line that August afternoon. Television announcers made blithe comments about the sound of his name. Lamothe was quickly forgotten as the marathon gave way to a Hollywood-style extravaganza that brought the Games of the XXIII Olympiad to a close.
SPORTS
April 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
While acknowledging that the procedure could cause legal and ethical controversies, the International Olympic Committee said it is considering a proposal to use blood samples to test athletes for doping in the 1992 Barcelona Games. The issue was raised at the IOC's executive board meeting by Prince Alexandre de Merode, chairman of the IOC's medical commission. The IOC relies on urine samples to test athletes for use of drugs.
OPINION
February 6, 2014 | By Fiona Hill and Steven Pifer
Vladimir Putin has been on his best behavior as the Sochi Olympic Games approach. He has granted amnesty to prisoners and political opponents, downplayed Russia's anti-gay law, lifted a blanket prohibition on demonstrations at Sochi and acted the welcoming host. The Olympics are a showcase for Russia and for him personally. He wants nothing to spoil the Games. The Sochi Olympics will come and go, and the less kind, less gentle Putin will be back. He is likely to turn attention to Russia's neighbors that drew closer to the European Union last year - to punish them and to try to drag them back into Moscow's fold.
WORLD
February 6, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
SOCHI, Russia - Half a mile away, thousands of people waved flags, held balloons and cheered Thursday as the Olympic torch passed by. Nina Toromonyan stood in the gray rubble that remains of her home and cried. She recalled her elation in 2007 when her city was selected to host this year's Olympic Winter Games. She imagined that wonderful things were coming. She didn't think that riot police would throw 13 family members out of their three-story home to make way for a new highway two miles away.
SPORTS
January 1, 2014 | By Helene Elliott
Some of the names read on Wednesday when the U.S. women's Olympic hockey roster was announced should sound familiar: Forward Alex Carpenter is the daughter of former NHL standout Bobby Carpenter, and forward Amanda Kessel is the sister of Toronto Maple Leafs winger Phil Kessel. Many other names will became more familiar in February, when the Americans pursue their fifth consecutive Olympic hockey medal but first gold since the inaugural women's Olympic tournament in 1998. The 21-player roster, announced during the second intermission of the NHL's Winter Classic game between the Detroit Red Wings and Toronto Maple Leafs at Michigan Stadium, includes 11 players who have played in previous Olympics and 21 who have played in women's world championship tournaments.
SPORTS
December 16, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
 It was 2007 when i met Kate Hansen , a 15-year-old from La Canada who lived in Southern California but dreamed of making the Olympic Games in the luge. Last week, her dream became a reality when she qualifed for the U.S. luge team at the Sochi Games. Hansen is now a student at Brigham Young. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
SPORTS
August 27, 2013 | By David Wharton
No stranger to the art of campaigning, Washington has thrown its hat into the ring as a candidate for the 2024 Olympics. The announcement came Tuesday as District of Columbia officials said they have formed a nonprofit group that will seek to bring the Summer Games back to the United States for the first time since 1996 in Atlanta. "We are the only major capital city in the world not to have hosted the Games yet," said Bob Sweeney, president of DC 2024. Washington joins Los Angeles, Philadelphia and Tulsa, Okla., as places where officials have openly discussed their interest in hosting the Olympics.
OPINION
August 22, 2013
Russia has embarked on a series of shameful steps against homosexuals. A recently passed law lays out heavy penalties for anyone who disseminates positive information to minors about "nontraditional" relationships, a vague law that could be construed to mean that a gay couple holding hands in public would be in trouble if children were present. Another law bans adoptions not just by homosexuals but by anyone living in a country that confers marriage rights on gay and lesbian couples.
SPORTS
June 25, 2013 | By David Wharton
The International Olympic Committee has released its technical evaluation of three cities vying for the 2020 Summer Games. And the news is good for Tokyo. The 110-page report  gives a first look at how the voting may go when IOC members cast their ballots in September. Tokyo, which hosted the 1964 Olympics, received praise for its transportation system and for being "a modern, dynamic city that sets global trends and, at the same time, has a strong respect for its history and culture.
SPORTS
May 30, 2013 | By Chuck Schilken
More medals than ever before are being produced for the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. Organizers of the event say they hope to avoid the disastrous outcome of the previous Winter Olympics by keeping as many of those 1,300 medals right there at home. “We'll try to keep all these medals in Russia, especially the gold ones,” Sochi organizing committee chief Dmitry Chernyshenko said Thursday as the coveted items were unveiled  the SportAccord International Convention in St. Petersburg.
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