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SPORTS
February 18, 2010
ALPINE SKIING A new look for super combined Anja Paerson, who leads active Alpine skiers with 41 World Cup victories, is the favorite in Thursday's super combined. The super combined is the only event that has changed its format since the 2006 Turin Games. Whereas the combined was a three-run event with one downhill and two slalom runs, the current version incorporates a downhill run and one slalom run. The winner is the skier with the fastest composite time. FIGURE SKATING It's Lysacek chasing Plushenko For once, there probably is more U.S. interest in men's figure skating than women's, as Evan Lysacek of the U.S., in second place after the short program, tries to catch Evgeny Plushenko of Russia in Thursday's free program.
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SPORTS
February 11, 2010 | By Helene Elliott
The gold medal Mark Johnson won as the leading scorer on the 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey team is sitting somewhere in the computer room of his home in Madison, Wis. "I couldn't tell you exactly where," he said, smiling. He didn't bring it with him to Vancouver for a second Olympic experience as coach of the U.S. women's hockey team, an opportunity that's as exhilarating for him as it was unexpected. He doesn't need to remind his players about the key role he played among the U.S. college kids who stunned the powerful Soviets and beat Finland to become Olympic champions and the patron saints of underdogs everywhere.
SPORTS
February 17, 2010 | By Brian Hamilton
Early Tuesday morning under a sunny sky, Shani Davis hopped a fence across the street from the Richmond Olympic Oval, striding inside for the required round of drug testing while once again on the eve of history. No man has won two gold medals in the 1,000-meter long-track speedskating event, and Wednesday, Davis has the chance to do just that. But there is an ancillary challenge too, in the uncomfortable irony that the staunchly independent, self-professed solo entity will skate to rescue a team.
SPORTS
February 20, 2010 | By Chris Kuc
Just a few thousand meters separate Apolo Anton Ohno from making history. The Seattle native has six medals in his Olympic career, tying him with Bonnie Blair for most by an American in Winter Games history. Ohno can win No. 7 on Saturday night when he competes in the 1,000-meter event. "The 1,000 is a very tough race," said Ohno, a three-time Olympian. "The first round of the quarterfinals are going to be ridiculously stacked. They could be finals themselves." South Korean skaters Sung Si-Bak, Lee Ho-Suk and Lee Jung-Su, along with J.R. Celski of the U.S. and Charles Hamelin of Canada, figure to be formidable opponents for Ohno, who is a two-time Olympic medalist in the event (bronze in 2006 and silver in 2002)
SPORTS
February 20, 2010 | By Helene Elliott
Mattias Norstrom, a King for nearly 11 seasons and their captain from 2001-02 until they traded him to Dallas three years ago, always said he had no interest in becoming a coach after his playing days ended. But here he is at the Olympics, standing behind Sweden's bench as an assistant to Bengt Gustafsson. Reminded of his vow, he laughed. "I still a little bit stand by that," he said Friday, "though that's hard to say when I'm standing here today." As classy and respected off the ice as he was steady and team-oriented on it, he retired after the 2007-08 season and took his family home to Stockholm to live a normal life, using his fingers to sketch quotation marks around the word normal as he uttered it. He and two friends started a business that deals with insuring and planning for Swedish artists and athletes, but he severed his ties to hockey.
SPORTS
February 20, 2010 | By Chris Dufresne
It might be over-the-top dramatic -- like the launching-pad jump on the women's course known as "Hot Air" -- to suggest that Saturday's super-giant slalom at Whistler Creek will be Lindsey Vonn's last appearance of the Olympics. It would be conjecture to think that Vonn, once considered a five-medal threat, will bow out after the super-G, perhaps with her second gold, forgoing next week's giant slalom and slalom. The thinking: Why endure more excruciating pain from her bruised right shin in the two events in which see is least likely to win a medal?
SPORTS
February 21, 2010 | By Chris Dufresne
Ted Ligety didn't only shock the Alpine world four years ago when, as a relative unknown, he won the Olympic combined at the 2006 Turin Games. Ligety stunned himself. "I still don't really believe that I won," he reflected four years later. "I think back at it and I'm still kind of in shock. It's kind of crazy to say that I'm an Olympic gold medalist." Sunday, in another Olympics, on another continent, Ligety defends his title at Whistler Creekside. It won't be easy.
SPORTS
February 18, 2010 | By Helene Elliott
For Team USA and host Canada, the first game of the Olympic men's hockey tournament was about shaking their jitters. Each was a little disjointed Tuesday, with Canada blanked by Norway for 22 minutes and the U.S. scoring only once in the first 25 minutes. Each gained momentum and wore down an inferior opponent. Canada defeated Norway, 8-0, and the U.S. sweated a bit before beating Switzerland, 3-1. "I think we had a lot of nervous energy as a team. I know for my part, I did," U.S. goalie Ryan Miller said.
SPORTS
January 31, 2010 | By Lisa Dillman
Only one person had a shot to beat snowboarder Gretchen Bleiler at the Winter X Games. It just happened to be Kelly Clark, an Olympic champion in 2002, and winner of all but one of the qualifiers for Vancouver. With Bleiler waiting and watching in the finish area, Clark dropped in for her third and final run and threw down a stellar performance, including a huge frontside 900. Then the hard part began. . . . waiting for the judges. Bleiler, the hometown Aspen hero, won the women's superpipe final by 0.66, edging Clark on Saturday night at Buttermilk Mountain.
SPORTS
February 26, 2010 | By Lisa Dillman
Life philosophy and Jeret "Speedy" Peterson finally merged, rather than collided, and produced a memorable result at the Olympics. All or nothing. Sitting in fifth place after one jump made his decision incredibly simple in the final of the men's aerials. The American didn't come all the way to Vancouver after living through what he called "enough turmoil and drama for three lifetimes" to leave the Hurricane on the shelf. And so, at 6:48 on Thursday night, he went down the ramp with speed, and almost everyone in the viewing area at Cypress Mountain knew what would happen.
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