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Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir

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WORLD
June 13, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Alsanosi Ahmed, Los Angeles Times
Fears of another civil war are playing out in Sudan as troops led by President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir have overrun towns and attacked tribesmen loyal to the south around a contested border region of oil reserves and well-armed militias. Bloodshed and streams of refugees are a dangerous prelude to July 9, when southern Sudan, after decades of conflict that left more than 2 million dead, gains independence. The south will inherit the bulk of the nation's oil supplies and the incursions by northern forces appear to be part of Bashir's strategy to press the south for last-minute concessions.
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WORLD
May 13, 2012 | By Alsanosi Ahmed and Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
KHARTOUM, Sudan - It has come to this: The Sudanese government is sending out text messages to the population begging for donations to help the cash-strapped military. "Please help support the army," the messages plead. "If you want to contribute 10 Sudanese pounds, send number 10, and if you want to contribute 50 pounds, send the number 50. " This would not appear to an optimum moment to get into a war with its newest neighbor, South Sudan. But pride on both sides of their disputed border is undermining hope of peace, analysts warn, with neither side willing to reach a deal on the oil both depend on. South Sudan independence in July has cost Sudan three-quarters of its oil revenue, paralyzing the nation's economy.
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WORLD
July 12, 2011 | By Christopher Goffard and Alsanosi Ahmed, Los Angeles Times
Facing increased scrutiny at home and a war crimes indictment abroad, Sudanese President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir stood before his National Assembly on Tuesday and promised a freer, more inclusive government. Bashir, who is wanted by the International Criminal Court in connection with massacres in Darfur, spoke just days after attending ceremonies marking South Sudan's independence from his own Khartoum-based government. Sudan is entering a "second republic" comprising mainly Muslim Arabs, and people will be able to vote on a new constitution crafted with widespread participation, he said.
OPINION
July 17, 2011 | Doyle McManus
How do you deal with a genocidal dictator who says he wants to reform? For more than a decade, Sudan has been the quintessential pariah state. Its armed forces carried out a campaign of genocide in Darfur, killing more than 300,000; its president, Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir, has been indicted for crimes against humanity. The Khartoum regime waged a long and unsuccessful war to prevent its non-Arab south from seceding; now that the new nation of South Sudan is independent, the regime is still attacking suspected separatists in areas under its control.
NEWS
July 6, 1989
Sudan's new military ruler said his junta will start peace talks with rebels today, less than a week after he seized power in a coup. Brig. Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir said the talks with the Sudan People's Liberation Army on ending the six-year-old civil war will be held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
WORLD
June 12, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Sudan's president pledged to do his best to disarm militias and push for a cease-fire in Darfur, according to a June 4 letter. The president, Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir, was responding to a May 24 letter from U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon saying he expected Khartoum and rebel groups to declare a cease-fire and the Sudanese government to disarm militias accused of killing, rape and pillage. Sudan also was to help peacekeepers get equipment into Darfur and speed access for relief groups.
WORLD
July 22, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Sudanese President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir, implicated by many in the international community in Darfur's killings, visited the troubled region for the first time in the four-year conflict there. The visit is part of his attempt to recast himself in the role of unifier. He is scheduled to visit the Darfur region's three provincial capitals in as many days. An estimated 200,000 people have been killed and about 2.
WORLD
July 12, 2011 | By Christopher Goffard and Alsanosi Ahmed, Los Angeles Times
Facing increased scrutiny at home and a war crimes indictment abroad, Sudanese President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir stood before his National Assembly on Tuesday and promised a freer, more inclusive government. Bashir, who is wanted by the International Criminal Court in connection with massacres in Darfur, spoke just days after attending ceremonies marking South Sudan's independence from his own Khartoum-based government. Sudan is entering a "second republic" comprising mainly Muslim Arabs, and people will be able to vote on a new constitution crafted with widespread participation, he said.
WORLD
June 30, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Alsanosi Ahmed, Los Angeles Times
His nation on the verge of shrinking, and trouble unfolding in every direction, Sudanese President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir is playing warrior and diplomat in efforts to keep his supporters loyal and his economy from collapsing under huge debt. Bashir's northern troops unleashed weeks of bloodshed and remain massed in the Abyei oil region near the soon-to-be independent southern Sudan. His soldiers further stunned the international community when they swept into nearby South Kordofan state and the Nuba Mountains to attack tribesmen accused of fomenting insurrection.
WORLD
June 28, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Sudan's President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir showed up 24 hours late Tuesday for a meeting with his most important ally, an embarrassing example of what might happen when you host a head of state who is also an alleged war criminal. Bashir missed a summit meeting with Chinese President Hu Jintao scheduled for Monday, and offered as a belated explanation that his plane had to turn around because it did not have permission to fly over Turkmenistan. He was en route from Iran, where he attended an anti-terrorism conference.
WORLD
June 13, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Alsanosi Ahmed, Los Angeles Times
Fears of another civil war are playing out in Sudan as troops led by President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir have overrun towns and attacked tribesmen loyal to the south around a contested border region of oil reserves and well-armed militias. Bloodshed and streams of refugees are a dangerous prelude to July 9, when southern Sudan, after decades of conflict that left more than 2 million dead, gains independence. The south will inherit the bulk of the nation's oil supplies and the incursions by northern forces appear to be part of Bashir's strategy to press the south for last-minute concessions.
WORLD
May 23, 2011 | By Alsanosi Ahmed, Los Angeles Times
Sudan's northern army seized control of a disputed, oil-rich region of central Sudan on Sunday, officials said, forcing thousands to flee and bringing the country to the brink of civil war. After weeks of clashes between northern and southern forces in the Abyei region, President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir — who is wanted by the International Criminal Court in connection with genocide in the Darfur region — on Saturday dissolved a joint council...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2011 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
George Clooney would like to bring a bit of Hollywood to one of the most remote and tense regions in Africa. Not red carpets and swag bags but the cold, intrusive, constant eye of a camera. "You can go on Google Earth and Google my house," said the actor. "I thought, if that's the way it is and they're gonna be able to Google my house, then people who are committing war crimes, specifically the government of Sudan, should be able to enjoy the same level of celebrity that I do. These people are public figures, and we're gonna take their pictures.
OPINION
December 26, 2010
Anyone who has traveled to both the desert-like north of Sudan ? where the capital city of Khartoum is located ? and the flood-prone south cannot help but notice the extraordinary differences between them. The people of the north are mostly lighter-skinned, Muslim Arabs. Those in the south tend to be darker-skinned, Christian and animist rather than Muslim, more recognizably African. The north borders the Arab nations of Egypt and Libya; the south leads to Kenya, Uganda and Congo. These disparate regions were melded into one country as part of the same blunt imperial exercise that deformed so much of the world: The British, that is, decided it should be so, creating a nearly 1-million-square-mile nation whose linguistic, cultural, racial and historical contradictions were readily apparent long before the country became independent in 1956.
WORLD
August 27, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
President Mwai Kibaki signed Kenya's new constitution Friday, describing the occasion as the greatest day since independence in 1963. But the presence of Sudanese President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir, wanted on charges of genocide and crimes against humanity, brought controversy to the event. Bashir defied an arrest warrant by the International Criminal Court to accept the Kenyan government's invitation, dismaying human rights observers. Kenya is obliged to arrest Bashir as a signatory to the Rome Statute, which established the court.
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