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Omar Jess

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NEWS
April 2, 1985 | Associated Press
An outbreak of cholera has killed more than 300 people at refugee camps in northwestern Somalia, the official Radio Mogadishu reported Monday. The radio, monitored in Nairobi, quoted Information Minister Mohamed Omar Jess as saying that 312 refugees from neighboring Ethiopia have already died of cholera and that doctors said that up to 500 more were suffering from the disease.
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NEWS
March 9, 1993 | Associated Press
Col. Omar Jess' fighters turned in more of their weapons Monday in Kismayu, and the U.S. military said it appeared that the militia was disbanding. But fighting claimed still more lives in the streets of the southern port city. Medicins Sans Frontieres, a French-based aid agency that has an office in Kismayu, reported two people killed and 24 injured in clashes Sunday, when combatants built barricades of burning tires. The U.S.
NEWS
December 29, 1992 | Associated Press
In the southern port of Kismayu, warlord Omar Jess ordered more than 100 members of a rival clan killed in door-to-door searches in the days before U.S.-led forces arrived Dec. 20, the New York Times reported today. The victims were members of the Harti clan. The paper quoted U.S. envoy Robert B. Oakley as saying he told Jess that "we knew exactly what went on and we won't forget it." Oakley and Jess met the day before the U.S. and Belgian forces arrived.
NEWS
March 18, 1993 | Reuters
The United States ordered a quick reaction force into the southern Somali port of Kismayu on Wednesday to investigate fighting that led to the suspension of national reconciliation talks in Addis Ababa. A U.S. military spokesman, Col. Fred Peck, said some of the 500 troops in the force arrived in Kismayu in the afternoon and the rest would arrive within 24 hours.
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | From Times Wire Services
Somali leaders, vowing to trade "the logic of force for the ethic of dialogue," agreed Saturday to establish an interim government to end the anarchy that has locked their country in a deadly cycle of famine and violence. After 13 days of bargaining at a U.N.-sponsored peace conference here, 15 chiefs of Somalia's warring factions reached a compromise accord to set up a three-tiered, federal-style administration to guide their country during a two-year period leading to elections.
NEWS
March 6, 1993 | Times Wire Services
Five Somalis were killed Friday in the southern Somali port of Kismayu, four of them in gun battles with Belgian troops, the U.S. military said. The fifth Somali died in renewed clan clashes in the port, the spokesman, Marine Col. Fred Peck, told reporters. He also announced that Kismayu's rival warlords, Mohamed Siad Hirsi, known as Gen. Morgan, and Omar Jess, volunteered to hand over more weapons to the U.S.-led task force today.
NEWS
June 24, 1993 | From Associated Press
The United Nations offered a reward Wednesday for information leading to the capture of Mohammed Farah Aidid, a day after the fugitive warlord virtually dared peacekeepers to try to arrest him. Posters and leaflets carrying a likeness of Aidid beneath the word "wanted" will be tacked up on walls and dropped by helicopters throughout Mogadishu today, U.N. spokesman Barrie Walkley said. The posters and leaflets do not specify the amount of the reward, and Walkley refused to disclose it.
NEWS
February 27, 1993 | From Associated Press
Nigerian troops serving with a U.S.-led coalition unleashed machine-gun fire and stormed a building Friday after snipers fired at them. But U.S. officials said recent violence would not delay U.S. troops' withdrawal. Calm returned to the rest of the capital after the riots Wednesday and Thursday. Fighting had also broken out in the southern city of Kismayu.
NEWS
February 13, 1994 | Reuters
Clan battles drove up to 5,000 people out of the southern port of Kismayu, and a grenade blast forced aid agencies Saturday to pull all foreign staff out of a central Somali town for the first time in two years. The battles in Kismayu, gateway to the fertile south, were the worst in six months. U.N. officers see the port as a prime flash point for renewed civil war with the pullout of U.S. troops and their Western allies from Somalia by March 31.
NEWS
December 30, 1992 | From Associated Press
U.S. troops moved into Mogadishu's lawless northern sector Tuesday and announced to rival clansmen and gunmen a crackdown on violence in advance of President Bush's visit to the capital. In the southern port of Kismayu, diplomats confirmed that a warlord had ordered door-to-door slayings of up to 200 rivals to consolidate his grip before the arrival of U.S. troops last week. The Western diplomats said the slaughter was carried out by militiamen loyal to an ally of Gen.
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