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Omar Khadr

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WORLD
June 24, 2007 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Omar Khadr, 20, is an unlikely poster boy for international justice. When he was 15, the Canadian landed in the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo after allegedly killing an Army medic during fighting in Afghanistan. His family has been dubbed "the First Family of Terrorism" in Canada: They lived in Osama bin Laden's Afghan compound, and his father reportedly helped channel money to Bin Laden's Al Qaeda terrorist network.
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NATIONAL
November 3, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
At first glance, the military trials of terrorism suspects at Guantanamo Bay appear to be winding down. One prisoner recently pleaded guilty to murder and other charges, and just one more, Noor Uthman Mohammed of Sudan, is charged with war crimes for alleged complicity with Al Qaeda. Of nearly 800 terrorism suspects brought to this remote U.S. base in southern Cuba over nearly nine years, 174 remain, most because of diplomatic troubles between Washington and their home countries rather than out of concern they would pose a security threat if freed.
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WORLD
October 26, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
A former child soldier from Canada was convicted of war crimes Monday, the fifth prisoner brought to justice by military commissions since the controversial tribunal was created nearly nine years ago ? the others being a cook, a propagandist, a driver and a onetime kangaroo skinner. Omar Khadr, now a tall and burly 24-year-old, pleaded guilty to five charges, including the murder of U.S. special forces soldier Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Speer while fighting at age 15 with hardened Al Qaeda militants in Afghanistan with whom his father had apprenticed him in 2002.
WORLD
October 31, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
A military jury deliberated more than five hours Saturday on the fate of former child soldier Omar Khadr, who has pleaded guilty to killing a U.S. soldier in Afghanistan when he was 15 years old. Khadr, now 24, has already been promised a limited sentence as part of a plea deal he agreed to Monday that would require him to spend one more year in U.S. custody in Guantanamo Bay. He would then be eligible to petition his native Canada for repatriation and...
WORLD
October 31, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
A military jury deliberated more than five hours Saturday on the fate of former child soldier Omar Khadr, who has pleaded guilty to killing a U.S. soldier in Afghanistan when he was 15 years old. Khadr, now 24, has already been promised a limited sentence as part of a plea deal he agreed to Monday that would require him to spend one more year in U.S. custody in Guantanamo Bay. He would then be eligible to petition his native Canada for repatriation and...
NATIONAL
May 6, 2010 | Reuters
U.S. interrogators tried to scare a young Canadian prisoner by making up a story about a skinny little Muslim gang-raped by black men at an American prison, an interrogator testified in the Guantanamo war crimes court Thursday. The testimony came in a hearing to determine whether statements that Toronto native Omar Khadr gave to interrogators can be used as evidence in his Guantanamo tribunal on charges of murdering a U.S. soldier with a grenade. Defense lawyers contend Khadr's statements were coerced during cruel and inhumane interrogations at Guantanamo and in Afghanistan, where Khadr was captured in a firefight at an alleged Al Qaeda compound at age 15. Khadr gave a false name and lied to interrogators who questioned him at the Bagram air base in Afghanistan shortly after his capture in 2002, a former soldier known as Interrogator No. 1 testified by video link from Arizona.
NATIONAL
July 16, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Burying his face in his hands, a 16-year-old captured in Afghanistan sobs and calls out, "Oh, Mommy," in a hidden-camera video that provides the first look at interrogations in the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Lawyers for Toronto-born Omar Khadr released the tapes Tuesday in hopes of generating sympathy for the young prisoner and of persuading Canada to seek custody of him before Khadr is prosecuted on war crimes charges at the U.S. special tribunal at Guantanamo this year.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2010 | Richard A. Serrano
After Omar Ahmed Khadr was captured in Afghanistan in 2002, his American interrogators gave him a Mickey Mouse book, which he clutched to his wounded chest as he slept. He even brought it to Guantanamo Bay, where he asked for other coloring books and pictures of big animals. He cried out for his mother. At 15, Khadr, a Canadian by birth, was among the youngest taken to the U.S. naval base prison in Cuba. But in Afghanistan, the U.S. government alleges, he was anything but childlike.
NATIONAL
September 25, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
washington -- A decision Monday night by a military court of review will pave the way for the Pentagon to restart its terrorism tribunals for detainees held at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The appeals panel, the U.S. Court of Military Commission Review, ruled that the commissions set up by Congress and the Defense Department did have jurisdiction to decide whether Omar Khadr was an unlawful enemy combatant.
NATIONAL
March 14, 2008 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
The Navy defense lawyer for a Canadian prisoner accused of killing a U.S. soldier in Afghanistan six years ago accused the Pentagon on Thursday of doctoring evidence to make his client appear guilty. In pretrial motions in the case of Omar Khadr, who was 15 when he was wounded and arrested by U.S. forces, Lt. Cmdr. William C. Kuebler said the Army commander for the Khost region of eastern Afghanistan reported on July 28, 2002, that the person who threw a grenade that killed Sgt. 1st Class Christopher J. Speer also died in the firefight.
WORLD
October 26, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
A former child soldier from Canada was convicted of war crimes Monday, the fifth prisoner brought to justice by military commissions since the controversial tribunal was created nearly nine years ago ? the others being a cook, a propagandist, a driver and a onetime kangaroo skinner. Omar Khadr, now a tall and burly 24-year-old, pleaded guilty to five charges, including the murder of U.S. special forces soldier Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Speer while fighting at age 15 with hardened Al Qaeda militants in Afghanistan with whom his father had apprenticed him in 2002.
NATIONAL
October 25, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
A young Canadian terrorism suspect accepted a plea deal Monday that will make him eligible to leave Guantanamo Bay prison in a year, sparing the Obama administration the spectacle of putting the first child soldier on trial for war crimes in modern times. Officials of the controversial military commission kept secret the length of the sentence agreed to for Omar Ahmed Khadr, who was 15 when he was captured in Afghanistan after a firefight between Al Qaeda militants and U.S. special forces in July 2002.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2010 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Rumors are swirling that a plea deal may be reached in the case of a young terrorism suspect, perhaps sparing the United States from becoming the first nation to try a former child soldier on war crimes charges. Omar Ahmed Khadr of Canada was 15 when he was captured in Afghanistan in the company of hardened Al Qaeda fighters with whom his militant father had apprenticed him in 2002. His trial, on charges that include the murder of a U.S. Army special forces soldier, is set to resume Monday.
NATIONAL
August 10, 2010 | By Richard A. Serrano, Tribune Washington Bureau
The youngest prisoner at the U.S. military base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, is scheduled to stand trial Tuesday on allegations of killing a U.S. soldier and partially blinding another, and the outcome probably will spark renewed international debate over the practice of incarcerating and prosecuting child soldiers. Eight years a captive at the prison for terrorism suspects, Omar Ahmed Khadr, 23, released a letter through his lawyers this spring warning that if the Obama administration takes him to trial in a military tribunal, it could reveal "what is going on down here.
NATIONAL
May 6, 2010 | Reuters
U.S. interrogators tried to scare a young Canadian prisoner by making up a story about a skinny little Muslim gang-raped by black men at an American prison, an interrogator testified in the Guantanamo war crimes court Thursday. The testimony came in a hearing to determine whether statements that Toronto native Omar Khadr gave to interrogators can be used as evidence in his Guantanamo tribunal on charges of murdering a U.S. soldier with a grenade. Defense lawyers contend Khadr's statements were coerced during cruel and inhumane interrogations at Guantanamo and in Afghanistan, where Khadr was captured in a firefight at an alleged Al Qaeda compound at age 15. Khadr gave a false name and lied to interrogators who questioned him at the Bagram air base in Afghanistan shortly after his capture in 2002, a former soldier known as Interrogator No. 1 testified by video link from Arizona.
NATIONAL
April 28, 2010 | Richard A. Serrano
After Omar Ahmed Khadr was captured in Afghanistan in 2002, his American interrogators gave him a Mickey Mouse book, which he clutched to his wounded chest as he slept. He even brought it to Guantanamo Bay, where he asked for other coloring books and pictures of big animals. He cried out for his mother. At 15, Khadr, a Canadian by birth, was among the youngest taken to the U.S. naval base prison in Cuba. But in Afghanistan, the U.S. government alleges, he was anything but childlike.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
Defense attorneys for terrorism suspect Omar Khadr said Thursday that they learned this week that there was an eyewitness whose testimony could exonerate Khadr of war crimes for his alleged role in an attack on U.S. soldiers. The prosecution has known about the witness since shortly after the July 2002 firefight in Afghanistan that killed a U.S. medic and left Khadr in the custody of U.S. forces, defenders said. Khadr has been at Guantanamo since November 2002.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2007 | Carol J. Williams, Times Staff Writer
The Pentagon on Tuesday charged a 20-year-old Canadian with murder and other war crimes for his alleged role in fighting U.S. forces in Afghanistan, including a 2002 grenade attack that killed a U.S. Army medic. Omar Khadr was 15 at the time of the clash between invading U.S. forces and Al Qaeda-backed Taliban militants in which Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Speer was fatally wounded, two Afghan militiamen were killed and several U.S. soldiers were injured.
NATIONAL
December 27, 2008 | Carol J. Williams
Two days after he was pulled unconscious from the rubble of a bombed Al Qaeda compound in southern Afghanistan, 15-year-old Omar Khadr lay strapped to a gurney, his left eye blinded by shrapnel, gunshot wounds to his back still raw. U.S. agents who conducted the first interrogation of the Canadian teen at Bagram air base near Kabul on July 29, 2002, gauged the effects of their questioning by the blood pressure meter attached to their inert subject.
NATIONAL
July 16, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Burying his face in his hands, a 16-year-old captured in Afghanistan sobs and calls out, "Oh, Mommy," in a hidden-camera video that provides the first look at interrogations in the U.S. military prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Lawyers for Toronto-born Omar Khadr released the tapes Tuesday in hopes of generating sympathy for the young prisoner and of persuading Canada to seek custody of him before Khadr is prosecuted on war crimes charges at the U.S. special tribunal at Guantanamo this year.
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