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Omar Sosa

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April 4, 2009 | Reed Johnson
When Omar Sosa walked onstage at the Jazz Bakery on Thursday evening, magisterially dressed in head-to-toe white, he carried with him a candle in one hand and a small carved deity in the other. Then, seated before his piano, he began tapping out notes in tandem with percussionist John Santos' extraordinary melange of found and sampled sounds, including cymbals, chimes, a cellphone ring tone and a child's music box playing "Frere Jacques."
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2009 | Reed Johnson
When Omar Sosa walked onstage at the Jazz Bakery on Thursday evening, magisterially dressed in head-to-toe white, he carried with him a candle in one hand and a small carved deity in the other. Then, seated before his piano, he began tapping out notes in tandem with percussionist John Santos' extraordinary melange of found and sampled sounds, including cymbals, chimes, a cellphone ring tone and a child's music box playing "Frere Jacques."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The relationship between jazz and Cuban music has been a virtual love feast since the '40s, when Mario Bauza, Machito, Dizzy Gillespie and Chano Pozo sat down at the same musical table. The close connection continued through succeeding decades, enhanced by groups such as Irakere since the '70s, and by the '80s defection to the U.S. of trumpeter Arturo Sandoval and woodwind specialist Paquito D'Rivera.
NEWS
October 2, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
High drama was in the air as Omar Sosa's octet gradually arrived on stage Tuesday at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts. Moving through the gently wafting vapor of smoke machines, past arching daggers of light, the players, one by one, took their positions, adding musical contributions to what started as a basic rhythmic pattern. First the two percussionists, followed by the bassist, the saxophonist, the rapper, the Afro-Cuban singer and the Moroccan singer. And, finally, Sosa.
NEWS
October 2, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
High drama was in the air as Omar Sosa's octet gradually arrived on stage Tuesday at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts. Moving through the gently wafting vapor of smoke machines, past arching daggers of light, the players, one by one, took their positions, adding musical contributions to what started as a basic rhythmic pattern. First the two percussionists, followed by the bassist, the saxophonist, the rapper, the Afro-Cuban singer and the Moroccan singer. And, finally, Sosa.
NEWS
April 18, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pianist Omar Sosa's appearance at the Jazz Bakery this week is subtitled "The Soul of Cuban Jazz." But that's a label that only partly describes the kaleidoscopic sounds and rhythms surging from the stage on Tuesday in the opening-night set from Sosa and his septet. Cuban elements were present in abundance, from Sosa's surging tumbaos and singer Martha Galarraga's steadfast clave playing to a flowing array of body-moving salsa rhythms and sweetly harmonized boleros.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Typically, the jazz nominations for the 45th Grammy Awards are a mix of prime choices, vaguely defined categories and entries that belong elsewhere. On the prime side, there is the classy best jazz instrumental album lineup. It's hard to go wrong with a grouping that includes Wayne Shorter, Dave Douglas, Michel Camilo, McCoy Tyner, Herbie Hancock, Michael Brecker and Roy Hargrove.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The main event this season: the appearance of the Keith Jarrett Trio at Disney Hall on Nov. 12. How will the Disney acoustics handle jazz? There's no better test than the sound of the Jarrett players. The subtle layers of textural interplay among Jarrett, bassist Gary Peacock and drummer Jack DeJohnette will provide the first opportunity to answer one of the fall's most significant musical questions. But there's much more.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Chris Barton
In a bit of an upset, Chick Corea will not be going home with another award this year. A winner of 20 Grammys, including two last year, Corea, with his latest album “The Vigil,” was shut out Friday night in this year's list of nominees, which again offered a welcome blend of relative newcomers and familiar faces. The jazz vocal category is led by 24-year-old phenom Cécile McLorin Salvant, whose ebullient "WomanChild" was nominated along with Gregory Porter's "Liquid Spirit," which was the big-voiced singer's Blue Note Records debut.
NEWS
November 25, 1997
Capistrano Valley. 17-10, 6-4 in 1996-97. Coach: Brian Mulligan (third year, 33-19). Two starters, 6-9 center Josh Garrett (7.2 points, 5.8 rebounds) and 6-2 junior guard/forward Mike Stowell (7.6 points, 6.1 rebounds) return. Stowell is expected to take over point guard responsibilities. Junior guard Jermaine McDaniel is back, as is senior forward Matt Dalton. Top newcomers include senior forwards Ryan Badrtalei and Omar Sosa, sophomore forward Lucas Pace and junior forward Tom Pincott.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The relationship between jazz and Cuban music has been a virtual love feast since the '40s, when Mario Bauza, Machito, Dizzy Gillespie and Chano Pozo sat down at the same musical table. The close connection continued through succeeding decades, enhanced by groups such as Irakere since the '70s, and by the '80s defection to the U.S. of trumpeter Arturo Sandoval and woodwind specialist Paquito D'Rivera.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2006 | Agustin Gurza, Times Staff Writer
Cuban percussionist Miguel "Anga" Diaz, an acclaimed conga master who perfected a dazzling five-drum technique with a versatility that allowed him to span genres from progressive jazz to traditional Afro-Cuban standards, has died. He was 45. Diaz, who was also a composer and arranger, suffered a heart attack Wednesday at his home in San Sadurni d'Anoia, a small town east of Barcelona, where he had recently moved in search of a more serene lifestyle.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1998 | DON HECKMAN
Grazing was the order of the day Friday and Saturday at the 41st annual Monterey Jazz Festival. Grazing for food in the festival's multitude of eating places, and grazing for music among the programs taking place simultaneously in six different venues. Toward that end, the colorful food court area was positioned in a long pathway connecting the principal performance arena, the Jimmy Lyons Stage, with the smaller concert locations.
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