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Omelet

ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1988 | J.D. GOLD
Chez Nous, though closer to an upscale Marie Callender's than to La Serre, is an oddly formal neighborhood cafe, all flowers and candlelight and bulbous wine glasses in an airy, plant-filled room that is surrounded by leaded windows. A glass deli counter at rear bursts with glistening pastries (Chez Nous doubles as a bakery).
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2001 | CHARLES PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Campanile, Ca' Brea, Sonora Cafe. There are some heavy hitters on La Brea Avenue in the blocks north of Wilshire Boulevard. But the neighborhood is also loaded with boutiques and antique shops--particularly antique shops. If you need antique door hinges, this is where you want to come. So while the big-name restaurants draw customers from all over town, a lot of locals and shoppers patronize the neighborhood's own restaurants, particularly during the day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 2000 | TOM VASICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The contemporary breakfast omelet seems to be exclusively West Coast property. Not a simple fluffy egg item, neatly folded with one, maybe two added ingredients, our omelets are densely packed mounds filled with a laundry list of meats and vegetables, and covered with a lava flow of melted cheese and rich additions such as sour cream and avocado.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1992 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For those who didn't know there actually are recipes for hash browns, be assured there's a good one in use at Crazy Otto's Diner, located so close to the Southern Pacific railroad tracks in Lancaster that your seat actually vibrates when the trains roll by. So says new owner Donald Whitbeck, who also believes those copycats over at the Copper Skillet in Palmdale have stolen it.
OPINION
December 8, 2007
In deciding to deliver a major address on "faith in America," Mitt Romney had several options. He could endorse John F. Kennedy's insistence in 1960 that "I believe in an America where the separation of church and state is absolute." Or he could embrace the tradition that America is "one nation under God" but not specifically a Christian nation. Or he could minimize the importance of controversial Mormon beliefs by noting that his religion was a matter of family tradition.
OPINION
March 3, 2010 | By Joyce Purnick
Iknow -- I really do -- that fine acting is not mimicry. But because films, especially biopics, shape reality -- often become reality -- I feel compelled to share my Julia Child story before Oscar night, when we will all once again watch clips of Meryl Streep's effusive portrayal of her in "Julie & Julia." It so happens that I interviewed the real Julia in her prime and saw a side of her that the moviegoing public would barely recognize. It was 1973, during a nationwide meat boycott that was triggered not -- as it might be today -- by indignation about crowded feedlots or inhumane cattle slaughtering but by matters of the pocketbook.
FOOD
March 11, 2010 | By Amy Scattergood, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Long before "Twilight" and "True Blood" and the Modern Age of Vampires, garlic was used as a talisman: a panacea against bad spirits in the Middle Ages and against illness during the Crusades. Even those of us who happily load our soups and stews with dozens of the pale cloves can tell why it was hung across doorways to prevent entrance. Mature garlic can be overwhelming, even relentless; a single raw clove minced on a board is capable of determining the course of an entire meal, whether you want it to or not. But imagine garlic without its bite, the autocracy of its properties calmed, even made subtle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 2001 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before taking a seat at P.J.'s Abbey in Orange, new visitors are encouraged to stroll around, look at what remains of the original flooring, admire the sky-high ceilings and enjoy the sunlight streaming through the magnificent stained-glass windows. Such perks should be added to the menu at P.J.'s Abbey, a restaurant inside what once was a Baptist Church. Several churches have owned the 110-year-old Gothic-style building, and have left behind some interesting objects.
NEWS
June 2, 1994 | DAVID B. GOLDMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Don't let the "Smoking" sign on the door scare you off. Or the banner in the window urging Camarillo residents to come in and sign a referendum petition urging repeal of the city's "no smoking" ordinance. Dorothy's Chuck Wagon Cafe is a small place, but it isn't--as one might expect from the signs--a dingy room full of smoke. Dorothy's is a popular local spot to get a large, satisfying breakfast at a good price.
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