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NEWS
March 18, 1991 | LARRY B. STAMMER and LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An oil tanker chartered by Chevron, U.S.A., ripped open an undersea oil pipeline with its anchor a mile off El Segundo on Saturday night, spilling 27,720 gallons of a highly volatile oily fuel mixture into Santa Monica Bay, the U.S. Coast Guard reported Sunday. The accident, which occurred at 7:05 p.m. but was not made public until nearly 11 hours later, forced the closure of the Marina del Rey yacht harbor as a 13-mile "safety zone" was declared from Venice to Manhattan Beach.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1991
Appeals to the U.S. Coast Guard to close an offshore oil terminal at El Segundo in the wake of last weekend's Santa Monica Bay spill mounted Thursday as state Controller Gray Davis joined nine members of Congress in urging the shutdown. Davis, who sits on the State Lands Commission, which oversees oil and gas development near the coast, said Saturday's spill of 21,000 gallons of an oily fuel mixture demonstrates a need for tighter safety measures.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1991 | MAURA DOLAN and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Oil that spilled into Santa Monica Bay from a ruptured pipeline during the weekend has been dispersed by stormy weather, making further cleanup unnecessary, U.S. Coast Guard officials said Tuesday. The officials said they did not detect any of the light, diesel-like oil mixture in the water or on beaches during an overflight of Santa Monica Bay on Tuesday morning. "Basically, the oil is not there anymore," said Coast Guard Senior Chief Petty Officer Mark Kennedy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1991 | MAURA DOLAN and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Oil that spilled into Santa Monica Bay from a ruptured pipeline during the weekend has been dispersed by stormy weather, making further cleanup unnecessary, U.S. Coast Guard officials said Tuesday. The officials said they did not detect any of the light, diesel-like oil mixture in the water or on beaches during an overflight of Santa Monica Bay on Tuesday morning. "Basically, the oil is not there anymore," said Coast Guard Senior Chief Petty Officer Mark Kennedy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1991
Appeals to the U.S. Coast Guard to close an offshore oil terminal at El Segundo in the wake of last weekend's Santa Monica Bay spill mounted Thursday as state Controller Gray Davis joined nine members of Congress in urging the shutdown. Davis, who sits on the State Lands Commission, which oversees oil and gas development near the coast, said Saturday's spill of 21,000 gallons of an oily fuel mixture demonstrates a need for tighter safety measures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1991 | MAURA DOLAN and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Oil from a weekend pipeline spill in Santa Monica Bay washed up along 3 1/2 miles of Malibu beaches Monday, permeating the well-heeled surfside community with the stench of petroleum. "You can smell it before you see it," said California Coastal Commissioner Madelyn Glickfeld, a Malibu resident. "The smell is absolutely overpowering." Cleanup efforts were halted late Monday afternoon as winds of up to 25 knots made it unsafe for small boats to remain at sea.
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | TINA ANIMA and LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tino Castro, president of the Ship Scalers and Painters Local 56 in San Pedro, was asleep when he got a call at 2 a.m. Sunday saying that there had been an oil spill in Santa Monica Bay and more than 300 workers were needed for emergency cleanup. From the two phones in the small local's office, Castro and his staff started calling union members and other workers who had been given the required federal safety training to help mop up an oil spill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1991 | MAURA DOLAN and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Oil from a weekend pipeline spill in Santa Monica Bay washed up along 3 1/2 miles of Malibu beaches Monday, permeating the well-heeled surfside community with the stench of petroleum. "You can smell it before you see it," said California Coastal Commissioner Madelyn Glickfeld, a Malibu resident. "The smell is absolutely overpowering." Cleanup efforts were halted late Monday afternoon as winds of up to 25 knots made it unsafe for small boats to remain at sea.
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | TINA ANIMA and LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Tino Castro, president of the Ship Scalers and Painters Local 56 in San Pedro, was asleep when he got a call at 2 a.m. Sunday saying that there had been an oil spill in Santa Monica Bay and more than 300 workers were needed for emergency cleanup. From the two phones in the small local's office, Castro and his staff started calling union members and other workers who had been given the required federal safety training to help mop up an oil spill.
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | LARRY B. STAMMER and LAURIE BECKLUND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An oil tanker chartered by Chevron, U.S.A., ripped open an undersea oil pipeline with its anchor a mile off El Segundo on Saturday night, spilling 27,720 gallons of a highly volatile oily fuel mixture into Santa Monica Bay, the U.S. Coast Guard reported Sunday. The accident, which occurred at 7:05 p.m. but was not made public until nearly 11 hours later, forced the closure of the Marina del Rey yacht harbor as a 13-mile "safety zone" was declared from Venice to Manhattan Beach.
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