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Ong Teng Cheong

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2002
Ong Teng Cheong, 66, the first elected president of Singapore, died Feb. 8 at his home after a 10-year battle with lymphoma. Born in Singapore, Ong was educated at the Chinese High School, and studied architecture in Australia and town planning in Britain. After working as a private architect, he joined the Singapore government as an architect and town planner before entering politics in the early 1970s.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2002
Ong Teng Cheong, 66, the first elected president of Singapore, died Feb. 8 at his home after a 10-year battle with lymphoma. Born in Singapore, Ong was educated at the Chinese High School, and studied architecture in Australia and town planning in Britain. After working as a private architect, he joined the Singapore government as an architect and town planner before entering politics in the early 1970s.
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NEWS
August 29, 1993 | From Associated Press
Former Deputy Prime Minister Ong Teng Cheong became Singapore's first elected president Saturday despite a strong showing by a reluctant opponent who had barely campaigned. Backed by the ruling People's Action Party and the nation's labor unions, the 57-year-old Ong was heavily favored to win a six-year term in the newly strengthened post. He faced token opposition from Chua Kim Yeow, 67, a retired civil servant and banker who said he was urged to run in order to provide a contest.
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | From Associated Press
Former Deputy Prime Minister Ong Teng Cheong became Singapore's first elected president Saturday despite a strong showing by a reluctant opponent who had barely campaigned. Backed by the ruling People's Action Party and the nation's labor unions, the 57-year-old Ong was heavily favored to win a six-year term in the newly strengthened post. He faced token opposition from Chua Kim Yeow, 67, a retired civil servant and banker who said he was urged to run in order to provide a contest.
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | From Reuters
Ong Teng Cheong, who will be sworn in Wednesday as Singapore's first elected president, began his career as a private architect but eventually became the island nation's top labor leader and deputy prime minister. Ong was elected Saturday, taking 59% of the valid votes, a lower percentage than many expected in his race against former banker and onetime Accountant General Chua Kim Yeow. Ong, 57, joined the civil service as a town planner, but his first love has been trade unionism.
NEWS
April 9, 1994 | Reuters
President Clinton has made a new personal plea to Singapore President Ong Teng Cheong for clemency in the case of Michael Fay, an American youth who has been sentenced to be caned with a rattan rod for vandalism. White House aides said Friday that Clinton wrote to the Singapore president Tuesday urging that Fay not be caned. Fay was sentenced March 3 to six strokes of the cane, four months in jail and a fine of $2,000 for spray-painting cars and other offenses.
NEWS
August 24, 1993
The former deputy prime minister looks like a shoo-in as Singapore prepares to choose its first popularly elected president Saturday. Ong Teng Cheong, the former deputy prime minister and labor union leader, has the support of the ruling People's Action Party. His opponent, Chua Kim Yeow, a former accountant general and head of the post office bank, planned no campaign. He said he's in the race only because he feels that a president should not be elected unopposed.
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | Reuters
Michael Fay, the American youth sentenced to be caned in Singapore, got little sympathy in his hometown Friday where a poll found residents backing the lash nearly two to one. "If Michael Fay was my son, I'd cane the hell out of him myself," one resident told the Dayton Daily News, which conducted a call-in telephone poll on the issue. Of 2,270 people who called the newspaper, 1,442 approved of the caning while 828 did not.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1994
Our unease over the flogging sentence meted out to an American youth in Singapore increases with news reports giving credence to his claim that he was coerced into confessing by threats of beating and prolonged interrogation in a refrigerated room. A ruling on the 18-year-old's final appeal for clemency to President Ong Teng Cheong is due soon. We hope the president considers this claim, and the well-documented flaws in Singapore's authoritarian system of criminal justice.
NEWS
May 4, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mother of an American teen-ager sentenced to a flogging for spray-painting cars said after visiting him in prison Tuesday that he is "doing OK" but still has not heard a reply to his appeal for clemency. The youth, Michael P. Fay, 18, is reading books and exercising but looked "a little pale," said his mother, Randy Chan. "He is anxiously awaiting word of whether the government will accept his clemency appeal. We haven't heard anything," she said.
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | From Reuters
Ong Teng Cheong, who will be sworn in Wednesday as Singapore's first elected president, began his career as a private architect but eventually became the island nation's top labor leader and deputy prime minister. Ong was elected Saturday, taking 59% of the valid votes, a lower percentage than many expected in his race against former banker and onetime Accountant General Chua Kim Yeow. Ong, 57, joined the civil service as a town planner, but his first love has been trade unionism.
NEWS
April 16, 1994 | From Reuters
Former President George Bush said Friday that he considers caning brutal and would not advocate it for his country, but stopped well short of a public appeal for Singapore to reconsider caning an American teen-age vandal. What Bush may have said behind the scenes in meetings with government leaders was not clear. A Singapore court last month sentenced 18-year-old Michael Fay to six strokes of the cane, four months in jail and a fine of $2,000 for spray-painting cars and other offenses.
NEWS
April 22, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Singapore government deliberated the fate of an American youth sentenced to a flogging for vandalism, a Hong Kong teen-ager was sentenced Thursday to twice the punishment, 12 strokes of a rattan cane, for his role in the spray-painting case. Shiu Chi Ho, a 17-year-old 10th-grader, was also sentenced to eight months in jail and a $967 fine after being convicted of four counts of vandalism. His lawyer said he would appeal.
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