Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOnion Field
IN THE NEWS

Onion Field

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Gregory Ulas Powell, one of the notorious "Onion Field" murderers whose 1963 slaying of a Los Angeles police officer shattered the image of the invincible cop and changed police practices, has died. He was 79. Powell, who served 49 years of a life sentence, died Sunday at California Medical Facility in Vacaville, part of the state prison system, according to Lt. Andre Gonzales, a spokesman for the state Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. He had prostate cancer. On March 10, 1963, Powell and accomplice Jimmy Lee Smith kidnapped two police officers in Hollywood and drove them to an onion field outside Bakersfield, where they killed Officer Ian James Campbell.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Gregory Ulas Powell, one of the notorious "Onion Field" murderers whose 1963 slaying of a Los Angeles police officer shattered the image of the invincible cop and changed police practices, has died. He was 79. Powell, who served 49 years of a life sentence, died Sunday at California Medical Facility in Vacaville, part of the state prison system, according to Lt. Andre Gonzales, a spokesman for the state Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. He had prostate cancer. On March 10, 1963, Powell and accomplice Jimmy Lee Smith kidnapped two police officers in Hollywood and drove them to an onion field outside Bakersfield, where they killed Officer Ian James Campbell.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 13, 2012 | By Kimi Yoshino, Los Angeles Times
Gregory U. Powell, who kidnapped two Los Angeles police officers in 1963 and killed one of them, has died, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said. He was 79. He died on Sunday after a battle with prostate cancer at the California Medical Facility in Vacaville. Powell's case was made famous in Joseph Wambaugh's book “The Onion Field.” It was March 9, 1963, when LAPD Officer Ian Campbell and his partner, Karl Hettinger, were driven to a Kern County onion field at gunpoint.
NEWS
August 13, 2012 | By Kimi Yoshino, Los Angeles Times
Gregory U. Powell, who kidnapped two Los Angeles police officers in 1963 and killed one of them, has died, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation said. He was 79. He died on Sunday after a battle with prostate cancer at the California Medical Facility in Vacaville. Powell's case was made famous in Joseph Wambaugh's book “The Onion Field.” It was March 9, 1963, when LAPD Officer Ian Campbell and his partner, Karl Hettinger, were driven to a Kern County onion field at gunpoint.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2010 | By Andrew Blankstein
Gregory Powell's crime, and its complex aftermath, were chronicled a generation ago in Joseph Wambaugh's bestselling book "The Onion Field." Now, as the public's recollection of the incident begins to fade, the union that represents nearly 10,000 Los Angeles police officers says it is determined to remind people of the March 1963 kidnapping and execution of Los Angeles Police Officer Ian Campbell. Powell, who was convicted of the crime along with an accomplice, is scheduled for a parole hearing Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2012 | By Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
LAPD Officer Ian Campbell's last breaths were in the dirt of a Kern County onion field. It was March 9, 1963, and he and his partner, Karl Hettinger, had been driven to the area at gunpoint. Hettinger managed to escape but Campbell was shot and killed, and his death was chronicled by author Joseph Wambaugh in his classic "The Onion Field" and a later film. Campbell's name will now be memorialized in the neighborhood that he patrolled, said L.A. city officials who on Friday dedicated a Hollywood intersection to the slain officer.
NEWS
May 5, 1994 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Karl Hettinger, the troubled survivor of the "Onion Field" attack that claimed the life of his police partner 31 years ago, died Wednesday at a hospital in Bakersfield after an illness of several months. Hettinger, 59, who suffered crushing bouts of depression and left the Los Angeles Police Department after the brutal ordeal, made a comeback as a politician in recent years, serving as a Kern County supervisor from 1987 until his defeat in a bid for reelection in 1992.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1990 | Steve Harvey
Paroled "Onion Field" police killer Jimmy Lee Smith was arrested in Van Nuys after he allegedly threatened a man with a butcher knife, Los Angeles police said Wednesday. Smith, 59, was arrested Tuesday on suspicion of assault with a deadly weapon, two weeks after a man complained that Smith had threatened him, Lt. Warren Knowles said. Smith, who police said was under the influence of heroin when arrested, was being held without bail because the arrest violates conditions of his parole.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2011 | By Michael J. Mishak, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- Closing a chapter on one of Los Angeles' most infamous crimes, the state parole board Tuesday rejected the final bid for the release of "Onion Field" killer Gregory Powell, whose 1963 kidnapping and murder of a police officer shocked the city and shattered the myth of the untouchable cop. Powell's doctor has found that the 78-year-old inmate is dying of prostate cancer and has six months or less to live, making him...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1988
Convicted "Onion Field" murderer Jimmie Lee Smith was ordered jailed for 180 days after he pleaded guilty to misdemeanor possession of a hypodermic needle. Smith, 57, was arrested in November for allegedly driving under the influence of an opiate after he was stopped for a traffic violation in Burbank. He was sentenced by Municipal Court Commissioner Alan S. Kalkin. Smith has been on parole since March, 1987, after serving three years for a 1984 conviction on possession of heroin for sale.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 2012 | By Susan King
Hollywood tackled the 1963 kidnap and killing of Los Angeles police officer Ian James Campbell in the 1979 film "The Onion Field. " But the film ended up playing a role in ensuring that one of the two convicted killers, Gregory Ulas Powell, stayed behind bars until his death Sunday at age 79 . In "The Onion Field," Powell was portrayed by actor James Woods. In 1982, Powell and accomplice Jimmy Lee Smith were scheduled to be paroled, but only Smith got out. Powell's parole was revoked after a public outcry spurred in part by a television broadcast of the movie.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2012 | By Corina Knoll, Los Angeles Times
LAPD Officer Ian Campbell's last breaths were in the dirt of a Kern County onion field. It was March 9, 1963, and he and his partner, Karl Hettinger, had been driven to the area at gunpoint. Hettinger managed to escape but Campbell was shot and killed, and his death was chronicled by author Joseph Wambaugh in his classic "The Onion Field" and a later film. Campbell's name will now be memorialized in the neighborhood that he patrolled, said L.A. city officials who on Friday dedicated a Hollywood intersection to the slain officer.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2012 | Carolyn Kellogg
The American Way of Eating Undercover at Walmart, Applebee's, Farm Fields and the Dinner Table Tracie McMillan Scribner: 336 pp., $25 -- Readers curious about food have been able to deepen their knowledge exponentially over the last decade. They know how bad fast food is (thanks to Eric Schlosser), understand the complexities of food production (thanks to Michael Pollan), and know how hard it is to work in a kitchen (thanks to Bill Bryson). There are shelves upon shelves of books about how, why and what we eat by restaurateurs, farmers, chefs and even moonlighting novelists.
OPINION
October 22, 2011
Gregory Powell, better known to L.A. history buffs and fans of novelist Joseph Wambaugh as the "Onion Field" killer, is going to die in prison. That's fine with the Los Angeles Police Protective League, the family of Powell's victim and even Powell himself. But it does raise questions about the state's "compassionate release" program and whether killers should be set free when their time is nearly up. In 1963, Powell and an accomplice abducted Los Angeles Police Officers Ian Campbell and Karl Hettinger at gunpoint, drove them to an onion field near Bakersfield and executed Campbell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2011 | By Michael J. Mishak, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento -- Closing a chapter on one of Los Angeles' most infamous crimes, the state parole board Tuesday rejected the final bid for the release of "Onion Field" killer Gregory Powell, whose 1963 kidnapping and murder of a police officer shocked the city and shattered the myth of the untouchable cop. Powell's doctor has found that the 78-year-old inmate is dying of prostate cancer and has six months or less to live, making him...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2010 | By Andrew Blankstein
Gregory Powell's crime, and its complex aftermath, were chronicled a generation ago in Joseph Wambaugh's bestselling book "The Onion Field." Now, as the public's recollection of the incident begins to fade, the union that represents nearly 10,000 Los Angeles police officers says it is determined to remind people of the March 1963 kidnapping and execution of Los Angeles Police Officer Ian Campbell. Powell, who was convicted of the crime along with an accomplice, is scheduled for a parole hearing Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1987 | Associated Press
Karl Hettinger, a former Los Angeles police officer who survived the 1963 "Onion Field" murder case, was appointed Wednesday by Gov. George Deukmejian to the Kern County Board of Supervisors. Hettinger, 52, who for the last 10 years has been administrative assistant to former Supervisor Trice Harvey, was appointed to serve the remaining 21 months of Harvey's term. Harvey was elected to the state Assembly last Nov. 4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2008 | Sam Quinones, Times Staff Writer
A farmworker found her body this week wrapped in a rug in a ditch beside an onion field east of Palmdale. Stevona Campbell, 13, had been missing since Sunday night. Known to her family as "Teeny" for her small size at birth, she had attended a large Mother's Day party at her family's apartment in east Palmdale. But she darted out of the apartment about 7 p.m. -- disobeying her mother's orders to stay home -- and never returned, family members said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2007 | Sam Quinones, Times Staff Writer
Jimmy Lee Smith, one of the notorious "Onion Field" killers, whose crime was documented in a best-selling book and a movie and who spent most of his life in and out of prison on repeated parole violations, has died. He was 76. Smith died Friday of a heart attack in the Pitchess Detention Center in Castaic, where he had been detained for yet another parole violation, according to Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department officials.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|