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OPINION
July 11, 2013
Re "Putting online classes to test," July 6 While online classes, remedial and otherwise, have tremendous potential, the fact that about 80% of students enter California's community colleges deficient in English and math should set off alarms. Graduation rates are indeed the prime measure of progress, but a high school education that doesn't educate just gives you a certificate that is not only worthless in the marketplace but devalues graduates who have earned their diplomas.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
Online programs at USC and UCLA were among those receiving top ratings in a new report to be released Wednesday by U.S. News & World Report, which also found that highly ranked programs are more common at established public universities than at for-profit online providers. The University of Southern California's online graduate computer information technology program was top-ranked nationally, the same position it held in last year's listing, while UCLA had the second-best ranked online graduate engineering program, moving up from 11th last year.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar
Online college course provider Coursera announced Wednesday that Yale University has joined the growing network of campuses that offer free classes through the organization. Mountain View, Calif.-based Coursera said that Yale will offer four courses initially -- Roman architecture, financial markets, moralities of everyday life and constitutional law -- bringing the total number of universities that offer courses through the group to 70. Millions worldwide take these kinds of free online courses through several organizations, most of which offer the courses without college credit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
San Jose State University is assuming control of, and scaling back on, an online initiative with education provider Udacity, officials said Tuesday, putting in question a collaboration that once symbolized the brave new face of online learning. Instead of five for-credit courses open for a fee to anyone, this spring the university will offer three online classes -- elementary statistics, introduction to programming and general psychology -- that will be open only to students enrolled at San Jose State or the other 22 Cal State campuses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
Hoping to take advantage of new technologies to expand online education, 10 additional public universities and state college systems around the country are affiliating with Coursera, one of the leading providers of online education. But the schools' participation may focus more on their local campuses rather than on the worldwide audiences that Coursera previously had been courting. Thursday's announcement of the new partnerships means that the state schools, from New York to New Mexico, will experiment with using Coursera's massive online open course (MOOC)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2013 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
While Jennifer Clay was at home taking an online exam for her business law class, a proctor a few hundred miles away was watching her every move. Using a webcam mounted in Clay's Los Angeles apartment, the monitor in Phoenix tracked how frequently her eyes shifted from the computer screen and listened for the telltale sounds of a possible helper in the room. Her computer browser was locked - remotely - to prevent Internet searches, and her typing pattern was analyzed to make sure she was who she said she was: Did she enter her password with the same rhythm as she had in the past?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2013 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
For Steven Ancheta, the time is long past for more arguments about online education's merits and convenience. The West Covina resident, who is enrolled in a fully online program for a bachelor's degree from Arizona State University, praised the experience and the chance for working people to take evening or weekend classes. His positive view about online education was strongly supported in a new USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times poll . Among the registered voters who participated in the survey, 59% said they agreed with the idea that increasing the number of online classes at California's public universities will make education more affordable and accessible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
To make it easier for students to earn college credits in online courses, government regulation of such classes should be streamlined across state boundaries and better consumer protection rules enacted, a national commission said Thursday. Rules and fees allowing online courses to operate for academic credit in various states sometimes conflict with each other and are unnecessarily restricting the potential growth of online learning, according to the group headed by former U.S. secretary of Education Richard Riley.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2000 | From Reuters
NEW YORK-Online bookstore Barnesandnoble.com said Tuesday it has purchased a minority stake in NotHarvard.com. The companies will jointly create Barnes & Noble University, which will use free, online education as a sales and marketing tool. Financial terms were not disclosed. However, Barnesandnoble.com is one of several new investors in NotHarvard.com, which raised $26 million in its second round of venture funding. Other investors include Impact Ventures, Merrill Lynch and Austin Ventures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
As colleges are rushing -- or being pushed -- to embrace online education, they might want to take pause: Most students prefer connecting with teachers and fellow students and don't want to take all of their classes online,  a new study suggests. Students preferred direct instruction if they expected a course to be difficult, singling out math and science, according to the study released Thursday by the Community College Research Center at Columbia University's Teachers College.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
San Jose State University is suspending a highly touted collaboration with online provider Udacity to offer low-cost, for-credit online courses after finding that more than half of the students failed to pass the classes, officials said Thursday. Preliminary results from a spring pilot project found student pass rates of 20% to 44% in remedial math, college-level algebra and elementary statistics courses. In a somewhat more promising outcome, 83% of students completed the classes.
OPINION
July 11, 2013
Re "Putting online classes to test," July 6 While online classes, remedial and otherwise, have tremendous potential, the fact that about 80% of students enter California's community colleges deficient in English and math should set off alarms. Graduation rates are indeed the prime measure of progress, but a high school education that doesn't educate just gives you a certificate that is not only worthless in the marketplace but devalues graduates who have earned their diplomas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
Of the 45 students who started Roya Furmuly's online remedial algebra class, just over half stayed until the end. The instructor at Pierce College in Woodland Hills dropped about eight for attendance problems and about eight withdrew on their own. Of the 28 who remained, only 15 passed. "We have a lot to figure out to make them more successful," Furmuly said of the students. Offering remedial classes online has become a key strategy for colleges and universities hoping to save money and move students out of basic skills classes into courses they get credit for. The ultimate goal is to get more students to graduate faster so they can make room for other students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2013 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
For Steven Ancheta, the time is long past for more arguments about online education's merits and convenience. The West Covina resident, who is enrolled in a fully online program for a bachelor's degree from Arizona State University, praised the experience and the chance for working people to take evening or weekend classes. His positive view about online education was strongly supported in a new USC Dornsife/Los Angeles Times poll . Among the registered voters who participated in the survey, 59% said they agreed with the idea that increasing the number of online classes at California's public universities will make education more affordable and accessible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
Hoping to take advantage of new technologies to expand online education, 10 additional public universities and state college systems around the country are affiliating with Coursera, one of the leading providers of online education. But the schools' participation may focus more on their local campuses rather than on the worldwide audiences that Coursera previously had been courting. Thursday's announcement of the new partnerships means that the state schools, from New York to New Mexico, will experiment with using Coursera's massive online open course (MOOC)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2013 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
California State University is moving aggressively to offer web-based science labs, a systemwide virtual campus and online advising as remedies for "bottlenecks" that impede student progress and graduation rates, officials said Tuesday. Some of these efforts will be ready to roll out this fall. The detailed strategies were presented in a meeting of the Cal State Board of Trustees in Long Beach as a response to Gov. Jerry Brown's call for the Cal State and University of California systems to improve student performance in exchange for long-term funding increases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2014 | By Carla Rivera
Online programs at USC and UCLA were among those receiving top ratings in a new report to be released Wednesday by U.S. News & World Report, which also found that highly ranked programs are more common at established public universities than at for-profit online providers. The University of Southern California's online graduate computer information technology program was top-ranked nationally, the same position it held in last year's listing, while UCLA had the second-best ranked online graduate engineering program, moving up from 11th last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2013 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
The new industry of large-scale online education will garner an important measure of academic respectability Thursday when the American Council on Education announces that four courses of the Mountain View, Calif.-based Coursera organization are worthy of college credit - if anti-cheating measures are enforced. It is now up to colleges and universities to decide whether to allow their students to replace traditional courses taught in classrooms with low-cost online courses that enroll many thousands of students worldwide and involve little direct interaction with instructors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar
Online college course provider Coursera announced Wednesday that Yale University has joined the growing network of campuses that offer free classes through the organization. Mountain View, Calif.-based Coursera said that Yale will offer four courses initially -- Roman architecture, financial markets, moralities of everyday life and constitutional law -- bringing the total number of universities that offer courses through the group to 70. Millions worldwide take these kinds of free online courses through several organizations, most of which offer the courses without college credit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2013 | By Larry Gordon, Los Angeles Times
While Jennifer Clay was at home taking an online exam for her business law class, a proctor a few hundred miles away was watching her every move. Using a webcam mounted in Clay's Los Angeles apartment, the monitor in Phoenix tracked how frequently her eyes shifted from the computer screen and listened for the telltale sounds of a possible helper in the room. Her computer browser was locked - remotely - to prevent Internet searches, and her typing pattern was analyzed to make sure she was who she said she was: Did she enter her password with the same rhythm as she had in the past?
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