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Online Journal Of Current Clinical Trials

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The first computerized, peer-reviewed, scientific journal is set to begin publication in April in response to mounting pressure within medicine for faster release of research findings that could prolong or save lives. The Online Journal of Current Clinical Trials will make research results available worldwide within 24 hours of peer review, eliminating the weeks or months often spent on typesetting, proofing, printing and delivering journals.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The first computerized, peer-reviewed, scientific journal is set to begin publication in April in response to mounting pressure within medicine for faster release of research findings that could prolong or save lives. The Online Journal of Current Clinical Trials will make research results available worldwide within 24 hours of peer review, eliminating the weeks or months often spent on typesetting, proofing, printing and delivering journals.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1992 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Liberal use of episiotomy, the surgical procedure done during childbirth to enlarge the birth canal, should be abandoned in favor of a more conservative case-by-case approach, according to a new Canadian report that suggests the surgery has fewer benefits than some obstetricians realize. The study of 703 uncomplicated births found that restricting episiotomy use to specific reasons related to the health of the mother and fetus was just as safe as routine use of the procedure.
NEWS
September 27, 1992 | WENDY MELILLO, THE WASHINGTON POST
Episiotomies, the common surgery to enlarge a woman's vagina to ease delivery of a baby, should not be a routine part of the birth process, a recent study concludes. Canadian researchers at the Jewish General Hospital and McGill University, both in Montreal, in a study of more than 700 births, found that women who did not have the procedure recovered quicker and experienced less pain after delivery.
NEWS
July 6, 1993 | KATHLEEN DOHENY
When you've tried every treatment on the market for what ails you--and you're still ailing--what's left? Perhaps a clinical trial. These closely supervised investigations evaluate new medical treatments for maladies, ranging from headaches to AIDS. At any time, hundreds of thousands of people participate in such trials worldwide, says Maria Lebron, managing editor of the Online Journal of Current Clinical Trials in Washington, D.C.
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