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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
The White House unveiled new antipiracy initiatives and is calling for more cooperation in the fight against intellectual property theft from search engines, data storage services and domain name registrars. The initiatives are an expansion of the Obama administration's 3-year-old program aimed at curbing piracy of movies, TV shows, music and other copyright materials. The White House will also seek greater cooperation from other countries where piracy is rampant. PHOTOS: Hollywood Backlot moments U.S. Intellectual Property Enforcement coordinator Victoria Espinel said the administration needs to be more "thoughtful and forceful" when it comes to cracking down on piracy.
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OPINION
November 12, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Joined by a number of top tech companies, the major Hollywood studios and music labels are hoping to enlist a powerful new ally in their fight against online piracy: grade schools. The companies are financing the development of a curriculum for grades K-12 that promotes respect for copyrights. Their interest is understandable, considering how piracy has exploded online and how early in life many kids start looking for free downloads. But it's important that schools not sign on blindly to the agenda of a single industry, that the message be balanced, and that it's just a small part of a broader lesson on how to use the Internet safely and responsibly.
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OPINION
July 8, 2011
After months of negotiations, movie studios, record labels and five top U.S. Internet service providers have come up with a framework for combating online piracy. Under the agreement announced Thursday, the ISPs will send warnings to customers whose broadband accounts had been used to transmit or receive copyrighted works without permission. Anyone who ignores repeated warnings will face a penalty, such as a slower Internet connection. It's not as draconian as the entertainment industry had sought, and it won't address underground sites that stream bootlegged movies and music.
BUSINESS
September 17, 2013 | By Richard Verrier
Despite the growth of Netflix, Amazon.com and other legal channels for watching entertainment online, the volume of pirated movies, TV shows, music, books and video games online continues to grow at a rapid pace. The amount of bandwidth used for copyright infringement in North America, Europe and Asia Pacific has grown nearly 160% from 2010 to 2012, accounting for 24% of total Internet bandwidth, according to a study from NetNames, the British brand protection firm. At the same time, the number of people engaged in copyright infringement has grown dramatically too. In January2013, 327 million unique users illegally sought copyrighted content, generating 14 billion page views on websites focused on piracy, up 10% from November 2011, according to the report.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2011 | By David G. Savage
In a little-noticed bipartisan effort, House Republicans and Senate Democrats have agreed to press for new laws to crack down on "rogue websites" that sell pirated copies of movies, TV shows, music and video games or counterfeit goods like sportswear and prescription drugs. "What these rogue websites do is theft, pure and simple," said Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.), chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee. "They are no more than digital stores selling stolen property. The Internet needs to be free and open — not lawless.
BUSINESS
May 13, 2005 | Jon Healey
The Motion Picture Assn. of America escalated its battle against online piracy, filing lawsuits against six websites that allegedly helped people download bootlegged TV shows. The studios' trade group claimed that the sites enabled users of BitTorrent software, a popular file-sharing program, to find and copy TV shows and other copyrighted works. Five of the sites were registered in the United States and the sixth, which specialized in Spanish-language programming, was registered in Spain.
BUSINESS
January 27, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Ten men were charged with violating federal copyright laws as part of an investigation into online piracy of movies, games, software and music, federal prosecutors said. The men from eight states were charged in San Jose as part of an investigation called Operation Copycat, the U.S. attorney's office in San Francisco said. The probe targeted "warez" groups -- the first sources for pirated entertainment distributed online. The 10 men will be formally charged Feb.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2004 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
Hollywood studios sued more than 200 alleged online movie pirates Tuesday, seeking damages of up to $150,000 for each film offered or downloaded on file-sharing networks. The Motion Picture Assn. of America disclosed few details about the suits, which were the first such actions by the industry. The suits were brought against "John Does" across the country. Some defendants were accused of sharing only one film. "There is no kind of a safe harbor for illegal conduct," said John G.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2003 | From Associated Press
Four men have pleaded guilty for their roles in an online piracy ring that illegally distributed tens of thousands of copyrighted items through the Internet. Federal prosecutors said Thursday that the guilty pleas were part of a national probe into pirated video games, movies, music files and computer software. Some of the file servers were located at the State University of New York at Albany. "The magnitude of this problem is serious and can't be underestimated," U.S. Atty.
REAL ESTATE
August 20, 2000 | DAN GORDON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In Hawaii last year, a real estate broker imported home listings from a competing broker's Web site onto his own home page. Though some experts argue that this might give the broker whose listing was pirated more exposure for his client's property, the National Assn. of Realtors sees it differently.
NEWS
August 9, 2013 | By Jon Healey
Here's an assumption underlying many a Big Idea online: If you make it easier for people to act on their impulses in a way that benefits your business, they will. A good example of this is Comcast's reported anti-piracy initiative. And my hunch is that it might explain Amazon founder Jeff Bezos' $250-million purchase of the Washington Post. Variety's Andrew Wallenstein reported this week that Comcast was trying to build support for a different approach to online piracy than the content industry's new "six strikes" Copyright Alert System . That system -- developed by representatives of the film, television, music and communications industries -- sends progressively stronger warnings to broadband customers whose accounts are used to download unauthorized copies of movies, TV shows and songs.
NEWS
July 15, 2013 | By Jon Healey
After months of talks with rights-holders, operators of some of the largest online advertising networks announced the steps they'll take to try to cut off online piracy hotbeds from the flow of marketing dollars. Their voluntary best practices drew praise from the White House and a mixed reaction from Hollywood studios and music companies, reflecting how incremental the moves seem to be.  Nevertheless, the steps, which eight advertising networks have endorsed, mirror a move by major brand advertisers to ensure that their messages not only reach the intended audience but do so in the right context.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
The White House unveiled new antipiracy initiatives and is calling for more cooperation in the fight against intellectual property theft from search engines, data storage services and domain name registrars. The initiatives are an expansion of the Obama administration's 3-year-old program aimed at curbing piracy of movies, TV shows, music and other copyright materials. The White House will also seek greater cooperation from other countries where piracy is rampant. PHOTOS: Hollywood Backlot moments U.S. Intellectual Property Enforcement coordinator Victoria Espinel said the administration needs to be more "thoughtful and forceful" when it comes to cracking down on piracy.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien, Los Angeles Times
SAN FRANCISCO - The escalating cyber attacks on corporate and government computers have provided a rare opportunity for bipartisan legislation to address the problem. But rather than sailing through Congress, the latest cyber security legislation is exposing a fault line in the tech industry. On one side stand some of tech's biggest companies, such as Intel Corp., Oracle Corp. and IBM Corp., which are pressing for more government action. On the other side are thousands of smaller tech firms and privacy activists who have launched online protests to raise the alarm over a bill they say harms privacy and civil liberties.
NEWS
February 25, 2013 | By Jon Healey
This week the entertainment industry finally is getting a version of something it has been craving since the original Napster transformed online piracy into a mass-market phenomenon: a new Copyright Alert System that turns Internet service providers into anti-piracy enforcers. It's not as powerful as the major record companies and Hollywood studios have proposed, and it ignores many sources of bootlegged music and movie files online. But it's a start. And if the industry's assumptions are correct, it could make a dent in the problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | By Richard Verrier
Chris Dodd, Hollywood's chief lobbyist, extended an olive branch to Silicon Valley. Eager to put to rest a bruising battle with Google and other tech companies over ill-fated anti-piracy bills this year, Dodd stressed common ground between California's two signature  industries in a speech Tuesday at the Commonwealth Club of California in San Francisco. "What I don't want to do is relive the SOPA debate -- and I hope you don't either," Dodd said, alluding to the Stop Online Piracy Act that sparked an unprecedented online protest led by Google, Wikipedia and other tech giants.
OPINION
November 12, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Joined by a number of top tech companies, the major Hollywood studios and music labels are hoping to enlist a powerful new ally in their fight against online piracy: grade schools. The companies are financing the development of a curriculum for grades K-12 that promotes respect for copyrights. Their interest is understandable, considering how piracy has exploded online and how early in life many kids start looking for free downloads. But it's important that schools not sign on blindly to the agenda of a single industry, that the message be balanced, and that it's just a small part of a broader lesson on how to use the Internet safely and responsibly.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2004 | Jon Healey
A federal judge in Los Angeles has ordered Malaysian businessman Tan Soo Leong and his California-based company, MasterSurf Inc., to pay $23.8 million to the major Hollywood studios for online piracy. Without the studios' permission, Leong operated a website, Film88.com, that let users watch hundreds of hit movies and classic television programs online for $1 per viewing.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 2012 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
Americans downloaded nearly 760 million songs using the BitTorrent file-sharing network in the first six months of this year -- surpassing the number of digital tracks purchased over that same period, according to a new report. BitTorrent's technology allows Web users to share large files by downloading small pieces from many computers at once. Although not all music available on BitTorrent is pirated the majority of the songs delivered through the network are not licensed. The findings of London researcher Musicmetric suggest that turning to the courts to block access to sites that facilitate illegal downloads -- as happened earlier this year in Britain, where Internet service providers were ordered to block access to the Pirate Bay -- is doing little to deter piracy.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2012 | Dawn C. Chmielewski
RANCHO PALOS VERDES -- William Morris Endeavor Entertainment co-chief executive Ari Emanuel used the platform of the Wall Street Journal's All Things Digital Conference to call on Silicon Valley and Hollywood to work together to curb Internet piracy -- in his own provocative style. "I'm going to get a lot of people [angry]," Emanuel said at the onset of his remarks, noting that Southern California's entertainment industry "probably screwed this up" and contributed to an impasse by pressing Congress to adopt the controversial Stop Online Piracy Act. The measure flatlined earlier this year amid fierce opposition from some of the largest Web companies and civil liberties groups.
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