Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOnline Radio
IN THE NEWS

Online Radio

NEWS
August 19, 2013 | By Adam Tschorn
Levi Strauss & Co. staged a full-on flashback to 1972 on Saturday, staging a music festival on a 40-acre estate in Topanga Canyon that included throwback bands, retro booze, tie-dye and flower-crown stations and lots and lots of slinky, hip-hugging, flare-legged denim. Dubbed Levi's Party in Your Pants, the daylong affair was the kickoff of the San Francisco-based jeans maker's marketing campaign for its new  -- well, old and new -- Orange Tab collection, a painstakingly faithful re-creation of a collection that Levi's introduced in 1969 and made until the late '70s.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
May 18, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
On the day Facebook went public other social media stocks have begun to drop like flies. Social media companies such as Zynga, LinkedIn, Groupon and Pandora that went public in the last year began Friday with some poor results, each seeing its stock price drop in the same fashion that Facebook stock began the day. Zynga, the social gaming site that relies on Facebook for the bulk of its users, was the biggest early loser. It saw an all-time low for its shares, at one point hitting $7.10, according to Yahoo Finance.
BUSINESS
March 8, 2002 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Radio stations, Webcasters and record labels are appealing an arbitration panel's proposed royalties for online radio services, arguing over rates that some say would kill most free Web broadcasts. At issue are fees that online radio services would have to pay to artists and record companies for each song played. The fee is $1.40 per thousand listeners for Internet-only stations, and 70 cents per thousand listeners for over-the-air stations that simultaneously broadcast online.
BUSINESS
December 9, 2000 | JEFF LEEDS and JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Radio stations must pay record companies for permission to broadcast musical programming over the Internet, the federal copyright office ruled Friday. The decision handed a major win to the Recording Industry Assn. of America, which has been locked in a battle with broadcasters for control of millions of dollars in potential revenue created by online radio. An estimated 4,000 of the nation's 13,000 radio stations simulcast their programming on the Web.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2002 | EDMUND SANDERS and JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Opening a new front in the war against digital music piracy, major record companies are asking computer and electronics manufacturers to help stop consumers from sharing songs copied from online radio broadcasts. The Recording Industry Assn.
OPINION
March 8, 2007
AN OBSCURE FEDERAL panel has sent Internet radio stations into a panic. The Copyright Royalty Board's decision to increase the amount of royalties due to music labels and recording artists is nominally a victory for labels and artists. But the victory could be Pyrrhic if it forces a consolidation and commercialization that robs online radio of its musical diversity.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2005 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
To get people hooked on its Rhapsody subscription music service, RealNetworks Inc. plans to let them listen for free -- up to a point. The company unveiled Tuesday an advertiser-supported online music service, dubbed "Rhapsody 25," along with several new wrinkles in the existing version of Rhapsody. The new service gives registered users 25 free plays a month from Rhapsody's online jukebox, and it lets them send songs to their friends.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2006 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
Instant messaging is one of the simple pleasures of the Internet. You just type and send, and your online buddy has your message in an instant. But now, many of the major instant-messaging services are making things more complicated by piling on audio and video chats, games, photo sharing, animated greetings, Internet radio channels and more. Also, some of the latest messaging programs include advertising.
BUSINESS
October 15, 2001 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Justice Department has intensified its antitrust investigation of the music industry's licensing practices, demanding that industry organizations and online companies submit a slew of documents related to Internet music services. The department recently began sending out "civil investigative demand" letters, hunting for evidence of collusion by record companies and affiliates to impede competition. The recipients of the letters include the Recording Industry Assn. of America, at least two Internet companies and MusicNet, an online music distributor jointly owned by three major labels and RealNetworks Inc. A copy of one letter obtained by The Times indicates that antitrust investigators are looking at all the terms proposed by the record companies and music publishers for their licenses, as well as the lawsuits they threatened, brought or settled over online music.
NEWS
December 20, 2001 | Reuters
Consumer electronics company Sonicblue this week unveiled a high-end home-entertainment hub that can store an entire music collection. At about $1,500, Sonicblue's Advanced Digital Audio Center is designed to become the centerpiece of a music enthusiast's wired home. It features a 40-gigabyte hard drive that can record up to 650 hours of music.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|