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OPINION
July 14, 2007
THE ROYALTIES and fees owed by online radio stations will increase substantially Sunday, the first in a series of hikes that threaten to put much of the industry out of business. But webcasters got a stay of execution this week when SoundExchange -- the royalty-collection agency for most record labels and artists -- pledged not to enforce some of the most onerous new provisions while negotiations continued.
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BUSINESS
March 7, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera and Josh Friedman, Times Staff Writers
WASHINGTON -- Video killed the radio star, as the 1979 hit song goes, and now some fear an obscure group of federal copyright judges may be on the verge of killing Internet radio. In a ruling made public Tuesday, the Copyright Royalty Board significantly increased the royalties paid to musicians and record labels for streaming digital songs online. The decision also ended a discounted fee for small Internet broadcasters.
BUSINESS
April 11, 2005 | Chris Gaither, Times Staff Writer
XM Satellite Radio Holdings Inc. is tuning to America Online to push its music service into the mainstream. The two companies plan to announce today that they will create an online radio service on the revamped AOL home page this summer featuring XM radio stations. They also plan to use their own services to promote each other.
BUSINESS
June 3, 2003 | Jon Healey, Times Staff Writer
Like frustrated prosecutors charging an acquitted crime boss with tax evasion, the major record labels are suing the creators of the Morpheus file-sharing network again -- not over the software that millions of people use to copy billons of songs for free but over a service that never launched.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2002 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House of Representatives on Monday rushed through a bill to let small Internet radio stations pay discounted royalties to record labels and artists, but its prospects in the Senate were clouded by hints of opposition from other broadcasters. The bill by House Judiciary Committee Chairman F. James Sensenbrenner Jr. (R-Wis.) would implement a deal hammered out by small Webcasters, record labels and artists' representatives after more than a week of intense negotiations.
BUSINESS
October 7, 2002 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Record labels and small Internet radio stations reached a long-awaited agreement Sunday that calls for significantly lower royalty payments for online music broadcasts, sources close to the negotiations said. Unless Congress changes the law quickly to implement the deal, however, these Webcasters will have to pay three years of back royalties Oct. 20 at the full rate set by the librarian of Congress. That rate--0.
BUSINESS
May 22, 2002 | JON HEALEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Library of Congress on Tuesday rejected a proposed royalty rate for online music broadcasts that threatened to drive many Internet radio stations out of business. However, the order by Librarian James H. Billington didn't indicate whether the final rate would be higher or lower than the hotly disputed proposal from a panel of arbitrators. It said only that a final determination was due by June 20. Still, many Webcasters viewed the ruling as a sign that their protests had been heard.
NEWS
June 7, 2001 | JON HEALEY, jon.healey@latimes.com
For decades, record companies have viewed radio broadcasters as friends whose loyalty carried a price tag. The labels provide the music that can draw listeners and advertising dollars to a station, but the broadcasters pay them no royalties. Instead, the money goes in the other direction. Labels funnel millions of promotional dollars each year to radio stations to help get their songs played, knowing that airplay is critical to selling CDs.
BUSINESS
November 2, 1998 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could help propel the struggling Internet radio business into a major new medium, RealNetworks today will announce new technology for building sophisticated, and potentially more profitable, online radio stations.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1996 | DANIEL AKST
As I write these words, I'm listening to some pretty cool soukous music thanks to one of the niftier Internet applications I've come across in a long time. It's called "TheDJ Player," and it's free for the downloading by pointing your World Wide Web browser at http://www.thedj.com/ and choosing "TheDJ Player." It only works with Windows95 right now, and it's still in beta, but those who can use it ought to try it.
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