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NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
Money worries are killing romance right when we need it, on Valentine's Day. The holiday means pricey dinners and sparkly gifts, an outlay of cash -- and added financial stress -- for many Americans. For those wanting to add some romantic sizzle, money worries are a cold shower. PHOTOS: For Valentine's Day, monogamous animals A recent survey shows money-related stress may be snuffing out sexual desire.  A majority of Americans surveyed in the Harris poll, conducted for financial data company Yodlee , thought about money more often than sex -- 62% of those 18 and older.
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TRAVEL
August 16, 1998
Airline customers are mad as hell, and they're just not taking it anymore--or are they? Only 417 travelers--about enough to fill a jumbo jet--responded last month to an online survey titled the "Air Traveler's Bill of Rights," launched with fanfare by the American Society of Travel Agents. That wasn't enough to get airline-by-airline ratings, and ASTA conceded it was disappointed. Still, a solid 66.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
The confirmation has arrived. Tablet owners do describe themselves as self-important know-it-alls. Nearly seven in 10 tablet owners say they are more knowledgeable about current events than their friends, compared to nearly five in 10 non-tablet owners, according to an online survey by Wakefield Research. A greater percentage of tablet owners also said they have pretended to know about a news story to impress someone else -- 52% versus 27%.  The survey also found that half of women and a third of men have cried to mourn a celebrity's death.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
If you never tip a concierge when staying at a hotel, you are not alone. According to an online survey of nearly 700 travelers, 55% said they never tip a concierge, and 23% said they tip between $2 and $4 per day. The survey by the hotel booking website Tingo found that housekeepers get better treatment. Among hotel guests, 40% said they tip $2 to $4 per day, and 15% tip $5 to $7 per day. Only 19% said they never tip a housekeeper. “I always tip hotel maids, and you should do it as soon as you check in, and thereafter each day of your stay,” said George Hobica, founder of Airfarewatchdog, a low-airfare alert and air travel advice website.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
For millions of U.S. consumers, one screen in the living room is not enough. A new study from KPMG finds that 60% of American television viewers are devoted multitaskers, watching TV and accessing the Internet at the same time. "We continue to see that multitasking is getting bigger and bigger," said Paul Wissmann, leader of KPMG's U.S. Media & Telecommunications practice. "It's getting to older generations as well, as there are more and more options in front of them. " IN CASE YOU MISSED IT  SAG 2013:   Winners  | Quotes  |  Photo Booth   |  Backstage  |  Best & Worst That has implications for network programmers and advertisers, which can no longer be sure which screen is drawing the viewer's eyes, Wissmann said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
Networks, advertisers and tech start-ups have been trying to better engage consumers who increasingly play with their smartphones and tablets while watching TV. According to a TV industry study, they have a long way to go.  Companies have been putting out apps that let viewers vote during reality shows, participate in polls, play trivia games and comment on the episodes with other viewers, encouraging fans to participate along with the programs...
NEWS
January 9, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
Americans love Las Vegas -- and apparently are prepared to love it even more this year. Las Vegas topped the list of 14 cities that travelers say they most want to visit in 2014, according to a survey by an online travel website. Americans seem to favor big cities, at least one theme park destination (Orlando, Fla.) and beach cities, according to the findings of online travel website Hotwire . "Along with exercising or eating right, traveling more is one of the most popular New Year's resolutions," company president Henrik Kjellberg said in a statement Tuesday.  California was the only state to have three cities -- San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Diego -- make the cut. Besides Las Vegas , here's the rest of the most desirable destinations: 2. Honolulu 3. New York City 4. San Francisco 5. Orlando 6. Washington, D.C. 7. Miami 8. Los Angeles 9. New Orleans 10. San Diego 11. Chicago 12. Boston 13. Anchorage 14. Seattle Hotwire's average hotel prices in those cities include $181 in New York City and $59 in Orlando.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Super storm Sandy, the monster hurricane put a freeze on the nation's busiest airspace and stranded fliers across the country, especially in flood-stricken East Coast airports. Unfortunately, many of those marooned travelers were stuck in airports with lousy reputations for food, comfort and entertainment. In fact, the least desirable airports to be stuck in include Washington's Dulles International, Hartfield-Jackson Atlanta International and New York's John F. Kennedy International, according to a new online survey by Misstravel.com, a dating site for frequent travelers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
An L.A. Unified program to serve breakfast in the classroom to make sure students don't start school hungry has increased pests, created messes and cut down on instructional time, according to a teacher survey released Monday. In an online survey conducted last month, United Teachers Los Angeles found that more than half of 729 respondents disliked the program but would support it if sanitation and time issues were resolved. More than half said that they have seen an increase in bugs and rodents in their classrooms, and that it takes an average of 30 minutes to set up the breakfast, feed the students and clean up. In a video posted on YouTube by the union, Anne Zerrien-Lee of Esperanza Elementary School said the daily breakfast takes up to 45 minutes of classroom time, causing her to cut out a “book exploration” activity.
HEALTH
November 3, 2003 | Jane E. Allen
Eating at your desk could make you sick. A new survey from the American Dietetic Assn. has found that nearly a third of those who bring their lunch to the office don't refrigerate it. Worse still, about four-fifths of them leave their lunch at room temperature for more than three hours -- ample time for those leftovers, salads, fish dishes or meat-and-cheese sandwiches to go bad. And although office parties allow co-workers to share some fun, they may also be sharing the spoilage.
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