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BUSINESS
March 23, 2014 | By Hugo Martin
The addition of airline bag fees several years ago created another travel annoyance: people who cram all of their travel necessities into carry-on bags to avoid the fees. United Airlines recently began a crackdown on those passengers. And it seems that many fliers agree with United. Nearly half of recent fliers who were questioned said they support United's crackdown, according to an online survey of more than 1,000 adults conducted by the London-based research company YouGov.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2013 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
For millions of U.S. consumers, one screen in the living room is not enough. A new study from KPMG finds that 60% of American television viewers are devoted multitaskers, watching TV and accessing the Internet at the same time. "We continue to see that multitasking is getting bigger and bigger," said Paul Wissmann, leader of KPMG's U.S. Media & Telecommunications practice. "It's getting to older generations as well, as there are more and more options in front of them. " IN CASE YOU MISSED IT  SAG 2013:   Winners  | Quotes  |  Photo Booth   |  Backstage  |  Best & Worst That has implications for network programmers and advertisers, which can no longer be sure which screen is drawing the viewer's eyes, Wissmann said.
TRAVEL
August 16, 1998
Airline customers are mad as hell, and they're just not taking it anymore--or are they? Only 417 travelers--about enough to fill a jumbo jet--responded last month to an online survey titled the "Air Traveler's Bill of Rights," launched with fanfare by the American Society of Travel Agents. That wasn't enough to get airline-by-airline ratings, and ASTA conceded it was disappointed. Still, a solid 66.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2012 | By Jori Finkel
How do you measure a city's cultural cache, or its reputation for serious art versus fun in the sun? The Getty has tried to do just that by commissioning multiple surveys related to its $10-million, decade-in-the-making, region-wide initiative Pacific Standard Time. On the whole, the surveys -- involving about 14,000 responses -- show that PST gave Los Angeles a bit of a boost in its reputation as an arts capital. Getty communications chief Ron Hartwig said the surveys, which relied on different population samplings and methodologies (and were vetted by the Getty's in-house metrics guru Tim Hart)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
Can kidz rite 2day? Despite popular perceptions that the onslaught of texting, tweeting and other digital technologies is ruining students writing skills, a national survey of teachers released Tuesday found such advantages as greater creativity, personal expression and increased collaboration. Teachers gave more than half their students grades of good to excellent for effectively organizing writing assignments, considering multiple viewpoints, synthesizing content from multiple sources, using appropriate style and tone, and constructing strong arguments in the survey by the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2013 | By Scott Collins
Corporate America may be running away from Paula Deen as fast as it can, but ordinary viewers are sticking with the deposed chef, a new poll says.  Seventy-one percent of respondents said they did not believe that Deen was a racist, according to the online survey from search engine Ask.com. And nearly two-thirds believe that another network will pick up Deen, who was dumped by the Food Network after scandal engulfed her last month. PHOTOS: Paula Deen scandal A court deposition surfaced in which Deen admitted to using the N-word and also planning a wedding party that would attire black wait staff as  slaves.
HEALTH
November 3, 2003 | Jane E. Allen
Eating at your desk could make you sick. A new survey from the American Dietetic Assn. has found that nearly a third of those who bring their lunch to the office don't refrigerate it. Worse still, about four-fifths of them leave their lunch at room temperature for more than three hours -- ample time for those leftovers, salads, fish dishes or meat-and-cheese sandwiches to go bad. And although office parties allow co-workers to share some fun, they may also be sharing the spoilage.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
When you travel for business, you might work hard and live a clean life, but most people suspect you are drinking, cheating on your spouse and stuffing your face with fatty food. That's the conclusion of an online survey of more than 2,000 adults taken by Harris Interactive on behalf of On24 Inc., a San Francisco-based Web casting and virtual events company. The survey found that 94% of those surveyed said “bad behaviors” take place among people who travel to business trade shows and conventions.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Chris Erskine
Here's something to ponder as Labor Day approaches: Los Angeles workers leave the highest percentage of their total employer-provided vacation time unused: 35%. By comparison, Boston workers let only 16% of their vacation days go unused. That's according to a new survey of America's 10 largest cities released this week by private destination club Inspirato . In all cities except Boston and Philadelphia, the majority of employees do not use all of their vacation time. San Francisco workers leave 32% of their total vacation days on the table, second only to L.A.'s 35%. Among America's 10 largest cities, the study found residents of Washington, D.C., were the most likely to take a vacation over the last five years while Chicagoans were the least likely.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
The confirmation has arrived. Tablet owners do describe themselves as self-important know-it-alls. Nearly seven in 10 tablet owners say they are more knowledgeable about current events than their friends, compared to nearly five in 10 non-tablet owners, according to an online survey by Wakefield Research. A greater percentage of tablet owners also said they have pretended to know about a news story to impress someone else -- 52% versus 27%.  The survey also found that half of women and a third of men have cried to mourn a celebrity's death.
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