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Online Survey

ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2013 | By Scott Collins
Corporate America may be running away from Paula Deen as fast as it can, but ordinary viewers are sticking with the deposed chef, a new poll says.  Seventy-one percent of respondents said they did not believe that Deen was a racist, according to the online survey from search engine Ask.com. And nearly two-thirds believe that another network will pick up Deen, who was dumped by the Food Network after scandal engulfed her last month. PHOTOS: Paula Deen scandal A court deposition surfaced in which Deen admitted to using the N-word and also planning a wedding party that would attire black wait staff as  slaves.
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BUSINESS
September 18, 1997 | (Denise Gellene)
A recent survey from New York advertising agency BBDO Worldwide, a unit of Omnicom Group Inc., shows consumers like outdoor advertising, such as billboards, signs on buses, trains and phone booths and so on. The agency said that 75% of consumers responding to the online survey said they didn't mind, or even liked, outdoor ads. When asked what form of outdoor advertising they liked best, billboards received the most responses (18%).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2013 | By Teresa Watanabe
An L.A. Unified program to serve breakfast in the classroom to make sure students don't start school hungry has increased pests, created messes and cut down on instructional time, according to a teacher survey released Monday. In an online survey conducted last month, United Teachers Los Angeles found that more than half of 729 respondents disliked the program but would support it if sanitation and time issues were resolved. More than half said that they have seen an increase in bugs and rodents in their classrooms, and that it takes an average of 30 minutes to set up the breakfast, feed the students and clean up. In a video posted on YouTube by the union, Anne Zerrien-Lee of Esperanza Elementary School said the daily breakfast takes up to 45 minutes of classroom time, causing her to cut out a “book exploration” activity.
BUSINESS
March 17, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
If you never tip a concierge when staying at a hotel, you are not alone. According to an online survey of nearly 700 travelers, 55% said they never tip a concierge, and 23% said they tip between $2 and $4 per day. The survey by the hotel booking website Tingo found that housekeepers get better treatment. Among hotel guests, 40% said they tip $2 to $4 per day, and 15% tip $5 to $7 per day. Only 19% said they never tip a housekeeper. “I always tip hotel maids, and you should do it as soon as you check in, and thereafter each day of your stay,” said George Hobica, founder of Airfarewatchdog, a low-airfare alert and air travel advice website.
TRAVEL
August 16, 1998
Airline customers are mad as hell, and they're just not taking it anymore--or are they? Only 417 travelers--about enough to fill a jumbo jet--responded last month to an online survey titled the "Air Traveler's Bill of Rights," launched with fanfare by the American Society of Travel Agents. That wasn't enough to get airline-by-airline ratings, and ASTA conceded it was disappointed. Still, a solid 66.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Super storm Sandy, the monster hurricane put a freeze on the nation's busiest airspace and stranded fliers across the country, especially in flood-stricken East Coast airports. Unfortunately, many of those marooned travelers were stuck in airports with lousy reputations for food, comfort and entertainment. In fact, the least desirable airports to be stuck in include Washington's Dulles International, Hartfield-Jackson Atlanta International and New York's John F. Kennedy International, according to a new online survey by Misstravel.com, a dating site for frequent travelers.
HEALTH
November 3, 2003 | Jane E. Allen
Eating at your desk could make you sick. A new survey from the American Dietetic Assn. has found that nearly a third of those who bring their lunch to the office don't refrigerate it. Worse still, about four-fifths of them leave their lunch at room temperature for more than three hours -- ample time for those leftovers, salads, fish dishes or meat-and-cheese sandwiches to go bad. And although office parties allow co-workers to share some fun, they may also be sharing the spoilage.
NEWS
August 28, 2012 | By Chris Erskine
Here's something to ponder as Labor Day approaches: Los Angeles workers leave the highest percentage of their total employer-provided vacation time unused: 35%. By comparison, Boston workers let only 16% of their vacation days go unused. That's according to a new survey of America's 10 largest cities released this week by private destination club Inspirato . In all cities except Boston and Philadelphia, the majority of employees do not use all of their vacation time. San Francisco workers leave 32% of their total vacation days on the table, second only to L.A.'s 35%. Among America's 10 largest cities, the study found residents of Washington, D.C., were the most likely to take a vacation over the last five years while Chicagoans were the least likely.
BUSINESS
June 26, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
The confirmation has arrived. Tablet owners do describe themselves as self-important know-it-alls. Nearly seven in 10 tablet owners say they are more knowledgeable about current events than their friends, compared to nearly five in 10 non-tablet owners, according to an online survey by Wakefield Research. A greater percentage of tablet owners also said they have pretended to know about a news story to impress someone else -- 52% versus 27%.  The survey also found that half of women and a third of men have cried to mourn a celebrity's death.
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