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BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- The Federal Trade Commission and California Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris say that Facebook is misinterpreting how a children's privacy law applies to teen privacy in a move that could undercut the giant social network in a federal court case in California. Facebook users sued the company for using their images in ads on the service without their consent and later settled the class-action lawsuit in 2012. Children's advocates are challenging the settlement in an effort to require Facebook to get explicit permission from parents before using the personal information - as well as the images, likes and comments - of teens in advertising.
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BUSINESS
March 17, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Airbnb, the company that lets users rent their apartments and homes to others, found itself working overtime this weekend to help a New York man whose apartment ended up being used for an adult party. Ari Teman, who identifies himself as a comedian on Twitter, messaged the company through Twitter on Saturday after discovering that the person he had rented his Manhattan apartment to had used it for an "XXX Freak Fest. " As recounted by a blog posted on Tumblr and a report by Gawker , Teman agreed to rent his apartment to a man who has been identified only as "David.
TRAVEL
March 16, 2014 | By Jen Leo
From the co-founder of Flickr comes a new travel app that's three parts photo-inspired sticky notes and one part treasure map. Name: Findery Available for: Website and iPhone, iPad and iPod touch What it does: Geo-tags "notes" all over the world connecting people with places, and places with stories. Create your own "notemaps," or list of notes. Even better - discover the world through other travelers' lists. Cost: Free What's hot: Lots of hyper-local travel apps point out brag-worthy hotspots, but Findery delves deeper, encouraging travelers and locals to imprint their memories and stories on a place.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2014 | By Todd Martens
There's good news and bad news if you're interested in, say, seeing Lady Gaga in Austin, Texas, on Thursday.  First, the bad news. To secure entry into the concert, which is sponsored by a snack food company and part of the South by Southwest festival and conference, one must complete any number of social media stunts. The good news, however, is one doesn't need to be in Austin to watch the concert at all.  Lady Gaga's Thursday night appearance at the relatively intimate Stubb's BBQ -- if a venue with a capacity of just more than 2,000 can be considered intimate -- is only one of many South by Southwest music events that will be available online.
BUSINESS
March 10, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - Aaron Levie, the 29-year-old chief executive of Box Inc., walked the red carpet at the Oscars this year in a dark suit and tie, pressed white shirt and his trademark neon blue sneakers. "I asked about the sneaker dress code," said Levie, who like many Silicon Valley entrepreneurs doesn't like anything slowing him down, least of all a pair of dress shoes. "Apparently it was not a problem. " It was the movie industry's biggest night and Levie didn't waste any time talking up cloud computing to Hollywood stars including Harrison Ford.
OPINION
March 5, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
As more of our children's education moves online, there are increased opportunities for abusing the collection of their personal data. Last month, state Senate leader Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) introduced a bill that would help close a loophole in federal regulations - at least in California - in an effort to safeguard personal information of public school students. The potential privacy violations could be significant, and it makes sense for the Legislature to act now. Under the federal Family and Educational Rights Protection Act, schools that receive federal funding are rightly barred from making disclosures about students' education records without permission.
NEWS
March 3, 2014 | By David A. Keeps
New York interior designer Celerie Kemble felt right at home at the recent opening party for Designers House at HD Buttercup in L.A.'s historic Helms Bakery building. “Here the designer gets to put together the things we've labored for years to create,” said Kemble, who selected furniture and accessories from her Henredon and Maitland Smith collections to decorate her signature space. “This is how I would put together a room for myself or one of my clients.” Designers House launched simultaneously as a Los Angeles retail space and as a website selling high-end, limited-quantity home furnishings from well-known interior designers.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2014 | By Chad Terhune
The average premium paid for Obamacare coverage on a leading insurance website has dropped by nearly $100 a month since October as more young people sign up, a new industry report shows. The average age of people buying coverage at online broker EHealthInsurance.com dropped from 44 mid-October to 36 in late February, according to the company. The average premium for 2014 health plans sold through EHealth tumbled from $370 a month to $273 over that period, which the company said reflects a higher proportion of younger applicants.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2014 | By Daniel Miller
With the launch of a new cloud-based movie service from Walt Disney Co., the marketplace of Web-based movie services just got more crowded and possibly confusing for consumers. After eschewing UltraViolet, a technology standard backed by its main movie business competitors, Burbank-based Walt Disney Co. has debuted Disney Movies Anywhere, a proprietary service that gives users online access to their digital and physical Disney movie purchases. Disney Movies Anywhere launched Tuesday and is available on Apple iOS devices including the iPhone, iPad and Apple TV. Users can also stream films by logging into the Disney Movies Anywhere website.
NEWS
February 24, 2014 | By David A. Keeps
Celebrated for his more-is-more interior designs, Hollywood legend Tony Duquette (1914-99) was, fittingly, more of a Renaissance man. He not only decorated the homes of Mary Pickford, Elizabeth Arden, J. Paul Getty and the Duke and Duchess of Windsor, but he also designed costumes and sets for the stage and MGM musicals, crafted jewelry and sculpture for the jet-set elite and was the first American artist to have a solo exhibition at the Louvre in...
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