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Onyx Acceptance Corp

BUSINESS
April 23, 1999
Shares in Onyx Acceptance Corp., the Foothill Ranch automobile finance company, surged 37% Thursday after the company said its first-quarter net income nearly tripled. Onyx said profits rose to $2.2 million, or 34 cents a share, from $742,360, or 12 cents a share, for the like period last year. Revenue increased 66% to $19.6 million from $11.8 million. The company's stock closed Thursday at $8.63 a share, up $2.31.
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BUSINESS
July 23, 1998
Onyx Acceptance Corp.: The Irvine automobile finance company said second-quarter net income more than doubled, to $1.4 million, or 21 cents a share, from $653,210, or 10 cents a share, in the same period of 1997. Revenue gained 63% to $14.2 million from $8.7 million. Net income for the six-month period increased 69% to $2.2 million, or 34 cents a share, from $1.3 million, or 20 cents a share, for the like period a year ago. Revenue advanced 64% to $26.1 million from $15.9 million.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2001 | Dow Jones
Onyx Acceptance Corp. director G. Bradford Jones reported an 8.4% stake in the Foothill Ranch company Tuesday in a regulatory filing. Jones, general partner of Brentwood Associates, controls 433,592 common shares of Onyx after acquiring 33,592 shares from Brentwood and buying 400,000 shares between Nov. 16 and Dec. 11 at prices varying from $3 to $3.50 a share, according to the report filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Onyx shares rose 19 cents to $3.56 in Nasdaq trading.
BUSINESS
February 15, 2000 | Edmond Sanders
Onyx Acceptance Corp. said that a class-action lawsuit filed last week against the company and some officers "has no foundation and is without merit." The lawsuit was filed after Onyx, a Foothill Ranch auto finance company, restated its financial results for 1996, 1997 and parts of 1998. The company attributed the restatement to an accounting change adopted to conform with new standards set by the Securities and Exchange Commission.
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