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Op Pro Surfing Championships

SPORTS
July 29, 1990
Dino Andino, San Clemente--Andino splits time between stops on the world and U.S. tours. He finished ninth at last year's Op Pro, upsetting second-seeded Damien Hardman in the second round. Shane Beschen, San Clemente--A recent graduate of San Clemente High, Beschen ranked in the top three on the U.S. tour. He won his first major professional title at the Easter Surfing meet at Bolsa Chica State Beach in April.
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SPORTS
July 29, 1990
Just when you thought that any pro surfer belonged on the list of the world's luckiest men--right up there with Ringo Starr and Ed McMahon--along comes Richie Collins. The Newport Beach surfer, ranked No. 13 on the Assn. of Surfing Professionals tour, defends his Op Pro championship this week at Huntington Beach.
SPORTS
July 29, 1990 | MIKE REILLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gone are the long, blondish-brown locks of hair and the scruffy beard that surfing fans saw so often on the victory stand last season, but so little this year. The way defending world champion Martin Potter figured it, a change in appearance would change his fortunes. After finishing no higher than third in his first four competitions this season, Potter of Newquay, England, made a trip to the barber shop.
NEWS
July 27, 1990 | MIKE REILLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tom Curren made a promise to his wife and newborn daughter last year--he would sit out the Assn. of Surfing Professionals world tour and spend more time at home in Biarritz, France. But Curren made one exception. He packed his boards last August and came to the Huntington Beach Pier with hopes of winning his fourth Op Pro championship. There's something about the Op Pro that attracts Curren, and the crowds, to the pier every year. It's become the largest surfing event on the U.S.
SPORTS
May 5, 1989 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, Times Staff Writer
The Op Pro Surfing Championships, the annual summer showcase for the world's top surfers held in Huntington Beach, have dropped their concurrent women's competition. For the most part, the move is a business decision designed to ensure the top men's surfers compete in what has become Southern California's only big-name, summer event, said Dan McCue, a spokesman for the surfing tournament. But Jorja Smith of San Clemente, a former champion of the women's contest, is feeling left out in the cold by the move.
SPORTS
August 8, 1988 | KEITH DUNNAVANT, Times Staff Writer
Santa Barbara's Tom Curren and San Clemente's Jorja Smith won the titles in the Op Pro Surfing Championships at Huntington Beach Sunday. Local favorite Jeff Booth of Laguna Beach lost in the semifinals, but went away from this championship feeling pretty good, just the same. Both finals featured Australia vs. Southern California showdowns. Curren defeated Australian Gary Elkerton to win his third Op title, and Smith defeated Pam Burridge of Australia to win her first Op title.
SPORTS
August 7, 1988 | KEITH DUNNAVANT, Times Staff Writer
Jeff Booth never thought it would be this easy. "Since I knocked off the defending champion, it's like I'm playing a video game on someone else's quarter," Booth said. "It's like I've got 30 seconds to score as many points as I can." Booth, 19, a Laguna Beach native, continued to score points Saturday at the $70,000 Op Pro Surfing Championship at Huntington Beach, which concludes today with semifinals and finals.
SPORTS
August 4, 1988 | KEITH DUNNAVANT, Times Staff Writer
Hurricane Hector is making waves off the coast of Mexico this week, which may mean good news for the Op Pro Surfing Championship at Huntington Beach. The expected south swell will be good for the surfers, good for the fans and good for business. Business? "It's true," said Todd Hamilton, the 1987 Assn. of Surfing Professionals rookie of the year. "Surfing is becoming a professional sport. People think of us as beach bums, but that's not the way it is.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 1986
I was an event official at the Op Pro Surfing Championships in Huntington Beach during the Aug. 31 riot, but I am writing as a private citizen concerning the way in which the police handled the situation. I noticed in your account of the riot that some interviewed youths thought the police were overly zealous in their use of force, and I would like to respond to that. First of all, I watched the entire episode develop and take place from a point 20 feet above the sand; in other words, I witnessed the entire riot.
SPORTS
September 1, 1986 | SARAH SMITH, Times Staff Writer
The men's final of the Op Pro Surfing Championships at Huntington Beach was almost anticlimactic for many spectators Sunday, since the reigning world champion and Southern California favorite--Tom Curren of Carpinteria--had been upset earlier in the day. Curren was beaten on the last wave of his semifinal heat by defending champion Mark Occhilupo of Australia. Occhilupo went on to beat fellow Australian Glen Winton in the final, which was marred by a riot on the beach behind the grandstands.
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