Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOpen Space Orange County
IN THE NEWS

Open Space Orange County

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2000 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Samson the hot-tubbing bear got $190,000. A pair of wood-chucking beavers came in a close second with $115,000. Perhaps it's a sign of Orange County's robust economy and the largess of its residents. No matter, county parks and the zoo are raking in big money from private donors and private corporations.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2010 | By Scott Kraft, Los Angeles Times
A rugged, 20,000-acre parcel of the original Irvine Ranch — a pristine landscape of steep canyons, native grassland and sycamore woodland that is home to golden eagles, mountain lions and dozens of rare and endangered species of plants and animals — became public property Tuesday in a historic deal with the developer who has sculpted the look of modern suburbia in Southern California. The open-space land, a gift from Donald Bren and the Irvine Co., was unanimously accepted by the Orange County Board of Supervisors, which also approved a long-term plan to manage the natural habitat, designated a National Natural Landmark four years ago. In one swoop, the size of parkland owned by the county grew by more than half.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2010 | By Scott Kraft, Los Angeles Times
A rugged, 20,000-acre parcel of the original Irvine Ranch — a pristine landscape of steep canyons, native grassland and sycamore woodland that is home to golden eagles, mountain lions and dozens of rare and endangered species of plants and animals — became public property Tuesday in a historic deal with the developer who has sculpted the look of modern suburbia in Southern California. The open-space land, a gift from Donald Bren and the Irvine Co., was unanimously accepted by the Orange County Board of Supervisors, which also approved a long-term plan to manage the natural habitat, designated a National Natural Landmark four years ago. In one swoop, the size of parkland owned by the county grew by more than half.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2000 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Samson the hot-tubbing bear got $190,000. A pair of wood-chucking beavers came in a close second with $115,000. Perhaps it's a sign of Orange County's robust economy and the largess of its residents. No matter, county parks and the zoo are raking in big money from private donors and private corporations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2000
Re "Parks: O.C.'s Great Outdoors," Feb. 20: Your editorial was right on the mark. Orange County is blessed with many wonderful parks, some of which are large enough to be ecologically self-sustaining. The Laguna Coast Wilderness Park, its adjoining neighbors, Crystal Cove State Park, Aliso and Wood Canyons Wilderness Park and the city of Irvine's dedicated open spaces in Bommer and Shady Canyons, comprise just such a system. With over 17,000 acres of dedicated open space, Orange County can be proud of an urban wilderness that few other such populous areas in our country can match.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2000
Re "Good Investment in Open Space" (Orange County Perspective, Oct. 19): Coal Canyon is a success story that demonstrates a cooperative spirit between public and private interests, between the many government agencies and focused-interest organizations involved in resource protection and enhancement, and between the environmental community and the development industry. I was very pleased to offer my support and help to acquire Coal Canyon as the county's newest open space. My office was fortunate enough to have funds available from the sale of county property in my district to offer $1 million to help in this effort.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Orange City Council late Tuesday continued to deliberate the fate of 6,800 acres of rural canyons east of the city where the Irvine Co. proposes to build nearly 4,000 homes. The hotly contested proposal covers one of the last swaths of privately owned open space in Orange County. The City Council began reviewing the plans a month ago, starting with public comments, and has considered it at four consecutive meetings. The Irvine Co.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1999
Thank you for your editorial "Progress for Open Space," June 20. It should be noted that a significant portion of the land that is being dedicated as open space to Orange County by the Irvine Co. is the result of litigation brought by the Friends of the Irvine Coast. The dedication of land on the Newport Coast, formerly called the Irvine Coast, which is seaward of the San Joaquin toll road, adjacent to Laguna Beach residential areas and Laguna Canyon Road, including Los Trancos and Muddy Canyons, is required by the agreement reached with the Irvine Co. as part of the settlement of our lawsuit that challenged the Local Coast Plan in 1988.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2001
Re "Inroads Into Open Space," Sept. 2: This excellent editorial very closely reflects my ideas and feelings and those of many of my colleagues who are interested in protecting open space in Orange County. The transportation problem for those living in Riverside County and working in Orange County should not be solved by constructing highways through our mountains but by long-term solutions, such as putting more industry and business in Riverside County, buying out the private owner of the Riverside Freeway toll road, expanding that freeway and adding more buses and trains between the counties.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1999
The Oct. 21 story "Bare Hill, Brooding Residents" expresses the outrage many of us in Laguna Beach feel as we witness the recent scarring and scalping of our coastal hills. Unfortunately, outrage is not enough. The reality is there is only one sure way for the public to protect undeveloped open space: Buy it! We need to decide that the few remaining parcels of wonderful open space in Orange County are worth preserving, buy them and designate them as parkland. It is just as simple as that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1999
I have been reading recent articles regarding the Foothill South toll road extension and find it amazing that politicians equate development and urban sprawl with a booming economy and success. One only needs to travel to Santa Barbara and see how a no-growth initiative with vast amount of open space for people and wildlife has caused none of the fiscal and economic maladies that our developers and their political and corporate allies claim occur without massive and explosive growth.
OPINION
March 14, 1993
Advocating jobs over environment ("A Worthy Project Gets Off the Ground," editorial, March 3) misses the unfortunate fact that the ill-conceived and embattled San Joaquin Hills toll road serves neither interest. In the most polluted air basin in the United States, it is a project that makes no environmental, transportation, or economic sense. Not only would it devastate the last coastal open space in Orange County--including the irreplaceable natural resources of the Laguna Greenbelt--the eight-lane toll road would aggravate the intractable air quality problems that plague the South Coast Air Basin, without any lasting reduction in traffic congestion.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|