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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By Meg James
It appears to be curtains again for "All My Children," the soap opera that ran four decades on ABC before being canceled, then resurrected as an Internet series. An actor on the series, Debbi Morgan, announced on Twitter that the show was "officially done" after one season on the Internet. "Thanks for the memories," Morgan tweeted late last week. Prospect Park, the production company behind the effort to keep the show alive, this week refused to discuss the situation or confirm Morgan's comment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
NEW YORK - If classical music composer Nico Muhly had his way, his occupation would to the average person seem about as exotic as being a plumber. "I want it to feel the same relationship you'd have with your local butcher or neighborhood fishmonger. It would be like the opening scene of 'Beauty and the Beast' where it's like, 'There's the composer!'" Muhly says at the Metropolitan Opera House, where he just made his debut with "Two Boys," an opera about Internet deception. At just 32, Muhly has already established himself as one of the leading classical musicians of his generation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Nita Lelyveld
What do turkey and opera have in common?  The L.A. Opera recently invited food writers and bloggers in to see. Opera staff members gave them a backstage tour as they prepared to stage Verdi's "Falstaff," in celebration of the Italian composer's 200th birthday. "Falstaff" opens Saturday. For each performance, a turkey will be cooked to be served onstage. For my latest City Beat story, I visited the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion to find out more about the opera's edible props.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2013 | By Nita Lelyveld
The L.A. Opera invited the press in to talk turkey. Not figuratively, as in shop talk about contraltos and coloratura. Turkey as in the cooked bird - which has a part to play in "Falstaff. " The opera is staging six performances of Verdi's comic masterpiece to celebrate his 200th birthday. For each one, it turns out, prop master Allen Tate will cook a turkey. Each bird will roast in the backstage oven for five hours before making its debut in Act II, Scene I. News of the "Falstaff" turkeys gave opera staff an idea: Why not hold their first food-centric press event?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
George A. Romero is known popularly as the father of the modern movie zombie because of his 1968 classic, "Night of the Living Dead. " But he recently had some less-than-flattering things to say about "The Walking Dead," the zombie TV series that wears its Romero influence on its sleeve. Speaking to the U.K. newspaper the Big Issue, Romero stated that he's chosen to stay far away from the AMC series, which is pushing zombies to the forefront of the pop culture zeitgeist. "They asked me to do a couple of episodes of 'The Walking Dead,' but I didn't want to be a part of it," Romero said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2013 | By Marcia Adair, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"When I was in high school and first heard the piece I immediately fell in love with it. It was sexy, naughty and little dangerous. By the time I got to college, I had dismissed it as cheesy trash. Now that I am older, it's all of the above. " That's Grant Gershon, music director of the Los Angeles Master Chorale, summing up the paradox that is Carl Orff's "Carmina Burana. " The choir is performing the work for the 17th time in its 50-year history Saturday and Sunday at Walt Disney Concert Hall, along with the L.A. Children's Chorus and three soloists.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Audra McDonald was in grand merry-making form for much of her magnificent L.A. Opera concert at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Performing a diverse selection of songs spanning almost a century of the American musical and interspersing these works with charmingly playful patter, she gave ample room Saturday night to novelty numbers that allowed this dramatic singer a rare opportunity to flex her musical comedy muscles. Yes, the woman who won her fifth Tony Award last year for her defiantly realistic portrayal of a drug-addicted prostitute in "The Gershwins' Porgy and Bess" happens to be an ace clown.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2013 | By Matt Cooper
Customized TV Listings are available here: www.latimes.com/tvtimes Click here to download TV listings for the week of Oct. 27 - Nov. 2, 2013 in PDF format This week's TV Movies   SUNDAY "Secrets of the Tower of London" takes you to where Britain's crown jewels are kept, where Anne Boleyn and countless others lost their heads, and so on and so forth. 8 p.m. KOCE O say can you see? "American Blackout" dramatizes the chaos one might encounter in the aftermath of a nationwide power failure.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
Giuseppe Verdi's 200th birthday celebration resumes in Southern California this weekend with the three-day Italian Opera Festival at the Soka Performing Arts Center in Aliso Viejo. The composer's birthday was Oct. 10. On Saturday, the festival at Soka University, an offshoot of the annual Tuscia Operafestival in Viterbo, Italy, will feature a “Viva Verdi!” program that includes overtures and arias from 10 of his works, including “La Traviata,” “Il Trovatore,” “Aida,” “Otello” and Verdi's “Requiem.” Stefano Vignati, the Tuscia festival's music director, conducts the Tuscia Operafestival Symphony with reinforcements from the Youth Philharmonic Orchestra, San Diego.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
If you hoped to catch the twilight Pacific Surfliner on Saturday at Union Station, you first had to pass through the Twilight Zone. The sign on the information booth read: "Please do not bother the nice person on the computer. She is part of an opera performance. " Dancers in imaginative traveling outfits might have obstructed your path or simply distracted you with some ferocious funny business on the floor. You would have had further need to jostle past a couple hundred gawkers sporting large headphones and not going where you were going or hearing what you were hearing.
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