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April 2, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
$130 Million Superfund Settlement in Monterey Park: More than 170 parties and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency reached agreement over cleanup of the Operating Industries Inc. Superfund site in the largest private party settlement of its kind. Two earlier settlements at the same site totaled $75 million. The consent decree was entered in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2001 | DEBORAH SCHOCH and HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Fifteen years after a Monterey Park dump was declared a Superfund site, lawyers Friday announced a $340-million pact in one of the nation's most costly and tangled toxic cleanup cases. The settlement for the Operating Industries site involves 177 polluters and provides for containing and monitoring contaminants at the 190-acre former landfill along the Pomona Freeway 10 miles east of downtown Los Angeles.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1989
U.S. District Judge Mariana R. Pfaelzer on Monday approved an agreement that calls for 113 companies and two government agencies to spend more than $67 million to help clean up the highly toxic Operating Industries Inc. landfill in Monterey Park. In settling a civil action filed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the state Department of Health Services, companies that shipped hazardous waste to the dump agreed to pay $33 million in cash and provide $34 million worth of cleanup work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1996
Thirty companies agreed Wednesday to pay $18.7 million to help tackle contamination at a Monterey Park landfill, bringing to more than $286 million the amount dedicated to the cleanup of one of the nation's worst hazardous waste dumps. The settlement announced by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Justice is the fifth reached with corporations and public entities after a decade of litigation over who is responsible for the 190-acre Operating Industries Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1992
A settlement has been formally approved under which 178 companies and government agencies that dumped hazardous waste at a Monterey Park landfill will pay $130 million to help clean up the site. The amount almost triples the money already paid by private parties to remove potentially harmful gases and other pollutants from the Operating Industries Inc. dump, which was shut down in 1984 after years of complaints about odors. The settlement was reached in December.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1992 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday that it will soon test about 200 homes in Montebello to determine whether a cancer-causing gas is seeping into them from a nearby landfill. EPA spokesman Dave Schmidt said the agency already has detected "very low levels" of vinyl chloride, a known human carcinogen, over the dump owned by Operating Industries Inc., located in Monterey Park and bordering a Montebello residential neighborhood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1992
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Tuesday announced a proposed settlement with 10 Southern California cities regarding the disposal of municipal solid waste in a Monterey Park landfill on the Superfund list. The cities that signed the pending settlement involving the Operating Industries Inc. landfill are Bell Gardens, Beverly Hills, El Monte, Huntington Park, La Puente, Norwalk, Paramount, San Marino, Sierra Madre and South El Monte.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1996
Thirty companies agreed Wednesday to pay $18.7 million to help tackle contamination at a Monterey Park landfill, bringing to more than $286 million the amount dedicated to the cleanup of one of the nation's worst hazardous waste dumps. The settlement announced by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Justice is the fifth reached with corporations and public entities after a decade of litigation over who is responsible for the 190-acre Operating Industries Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1988 | MIKE WARD, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 120 companies and government agencies that sent hazardous waste to the Operating Industries Inc. dump in Monterey Park will pay $66 million to help clean it up under an agreement announced Wednesday by state and federal officials. Daniel W. McGovern, regional administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, called the agreement "a landmark for the Superfund program." The companies will reimburse the EPA $18.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 3, 1990 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what may be a landmark lawsuit, 29 cities in Los Angeles County have been sued by a consortium of high-powered corporations in an attempt to spread the blame for the lingering toxic contamination that closed a major Monterey Park dump site six years ago.
NEWS
December 30, 1994 | MARLA CONE, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
In a landmark agreement that advances efforts to clean up one of the nation's worst hazardous waste dumps, 14 Los Angeles County cities and a host of waste haulers and other public agencies agreed Thursday to pay more than $63 million to clean up the landfill in Monterey Park. The agreement, announced by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S.
NEWS
March 2, 1994 | ANDREW LePAGE and RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an unusual case that pits a host of blue-chip corporations against 14 cities in Los Angeles County, the municipalities have tentatively agreed to contribute about $31 million to the cleanup of a Monterey Park landfill once considered one of the most toxic dumps in the country. The settlement would climax a four-year legal battle between the corporations and 29 suburban cities over who was going to pay for the cleanup of the Operating Industries landfill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1993
Los Angeles County and five waste disposal districts sued 25 trash haulers Monday to make them pay if the county is held liable in lawsuits over toxicity problems at the Operating Industries landfill in Monterey Park. The county and the Athens-Woodcrest-Olivita, Belvedere, Firestone, Mesa Heights and Walnut Park disposal districts filed the suit in Los Angeles Superior Court.
NEWS
June 17, 1993
Seventy-five California cities, including four from the San Gabriel Valley, are enlisting the public's help to win federal limits on municipal contributions to clean up Superfund sites. The Environmental Protection Agency is considering limiting the amount of money corporations can seek from cities in lawsuits to 4% of the total bill for cleaning up Superfund sites. Corporations have claimed that municipal garbage is also to blame for the pollution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1993 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Navy has agreed to pay more than $1 million to help finance the cleanup of lingering contamination at a Monterey Park landfill--one of the nation's worst hazardous-waste sites. The settlement on behalf of the Long Beach Naval Facility, which sent 635,000 gallons of industrial waste to the dump--will absolve the Navy from liability in the first stage of the cleanup, federal environmental officials announced Tuesday in San Francisco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1992
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Tuesday announced a proposed settlement with 10 Southern California cities regarding the disposal of municipal solid waste in a Monterey Park landfill on the Superfund list. The cities that signed the pending settlement involving the Operating Industries Inc. landfill are Bell Gardens, Beverly Hills, El Monte, Huntington Park, La Puente, Norwalk, Paramount, San Marino, Sierra Madre and South El Monte.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1991 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U. S. Environmental Protection Agency officials announced Tuesday that they had reached a settlement with 178 companies and governmental agencies, which agreed to pay $130 million to $150 million in cleanup costs at a former landfill in Monterey Park. The agreement, filed Tuesday in U. S. District Court in Los Angeles, represents the largest settlement of its kind in the history of the federal Superfund program, said Jeff Zelikson, EPA regional administrator for hazardous waste.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1993 | BERKLEY HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Navy has agreed to pay more than $1 million to help finance the cleanup of lingering contamination at a Monterey Park landfill--one of the nation's worst hazardous-waste sites. The settlement on behalf of the Long Beach Naval Facility, which sent 635,000 gallons of industrial waste to the dump--will absolve the Navy from liability in the first stage of the cleanup, federal environmental officials announced Tuesday in San Francisco.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1992 | MAURA DOLAN, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday that it will soon test about 200 homes in Montebello to determine whether a cancer-causing gas is seeping into them from a nearby landfill. EPA spokesman Dave Schmidt said the agency already has detected "very low levels" of vinyl chloride, a known human carcinogen, over the dump owned by Operating Industries Inc., located in Monterey Park and bordering a Montebello residential neighborhood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1992
In a ruling that could force 14 cities to help pay for part of the estimated $500-million cleanup at a Monterey Park landfill, U.S. District Judge William M. Byrne Jr. concluded Tuesday that the cities were the owners of trash taken to the dump. A consortium of 65 corporations, including many of America's biggest companies, contend that the cities, all in Los Angeles County, helped contribute to the toxic mess at the now-closed Operating Industries dump.
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