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NEWS
April 5, 1985 | MARYLOUISE OATES, Times Staff Writer
TEN-GALLON FUND-RAISING Operation California is well on the way to establishing what may be the most lucrative branch office in fund-raising history. OpCal--an international relief agency that has flown supplies to Asia, Central America and Africa--has always raised its money from California sources, especially from the entertainment industry. Now it's mining the fund-raising possibilities of Texas.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2013 | By Martha Groves and Matt Stevens
The California Department of Food and Agriculture on Friday issued notices of violation to two Orthodox Jewish groups that were slaughtering chickens in the Pico-Robertson area as part of an ancient atonement ritual. The action was taken after animal rights activists and some faith leaders protested the practice, known as kaparot , throughout the Jewish High Holy Days, saying it was inhumane. A state investigator determined that the facilities were slaughterhouses operating without licenses, in violation of law, said Steve Lyle, a spokesman for the state Department of Food and Agriculture.
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NEWS
March 3, 1987 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
In all his years as a family physician in Redlands, Calif., Dr. Steve Peterson had never seen anything like Tondo General Hospital. Until Monday, Peterson had never seen surgery performed in a dingy hallway outside an operating room already full and unable to accommodate even patients who were dying. He had never seen a hospital so poor that it must wash and recycle surgical gloves and must sometimes delay urgent surgery because there are no gloves.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher and Salvador Rodriguez
SACRAMENTO - Ride-sharing companies that connect passengers to drivers via smartphones should be allowed to continue operating in California if they comply with basic safety rules, state regulators proposed Tuesday. The recommendation now goes to the five-member Public Utilities Commission as early as its Sept. 5 meeting. Commissioners can accept or deny the recommendations or offer alternatives for regulating such increasingly popular ride-sharing companies as Lyft Inc., Sidecar and Uber Technologies Inc. The three companies provide transportation for a fee or donation , connecting paying passengers with drivers who use their own vehicles.
NEWS
June 13, 1988 | TIA GINDICK
Operation California board member Tony Adams, standing back while Julie Andrews spoke to "Entertainment Tonight," looked around the room and called it culture shock. But then he was from Ireland, he said. He didn't know that much about the Wild West. Actress Sandra Currie confessed this was her first heavy dose of cowboy art and she was enthralled.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher and Salvador Rodriguez
SACRAMENTO - Ride-sharing companies that connect passengers to drivers via smartphones should be allowed to continue operating in California if they comply with basic safety rules, state regulators proposed Tuesday. The recommendation now goes to the five-member Public Utilities Commission as early as its Sept. 5 meeting. Commissioners can accept or deny the recommendations or offer alternatives for regulating such increasingly popular ride-sharing companies as Lyft Inc., Sidecar and Uber Technologies Inc. The three companies provide transportation for a fee or donation , connecting paying passengers with drivers who use their own vehicles.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH and JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
New federal air pollution rules could remake the face of West Coast shipping, industry officials said Wednesday, driving commerce away from California just as international trade is becoming recognized as a core industry for the region in the coming century. Backers of the rules--unveiled this week by the U.S.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1990 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the most sweeping challenge of the broadcast industry since the early 1970s, civil rights groups over the past 20 months have asked the Federal Communications Commission to revoke the licenses of more than 200 radio and TV stations that allegedly have not met FCC minority employment obligations. On July 2, the NAACP and the National Hispanic Media Coalition filed their latest round of challenges--opposing the license renewals of 24 Texas radio stations.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1988 | DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Times Staff Writer
Wells Fargo Bank, in a move that will put it in the forefront of the drive to gain new powers for banks, acknowledged Thursday that it will open a full-service brokerage on Jan. 1. The San Francisco-based company will be the first California bank to offer services that are virtually identical to those available at brokerages such as Merrill Lynch and Shearson Lehman Hutton. Only a handful of banks in the country have full brokerage operations.
NEWS
November 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
A skier was found guilty of criminally negligent homicide in the 1997 death of another skier he ran into on the slopes in a high-speed collision, in the first criminal trial of its kind in the United States, officials said Friday. Nathan Hall, 21, of Chico, Calif., was found guilty late Thursday in the 1997 death of Alan Cobb, 33, of Denver. Prosecutors had urged the jury--made up of skiers and snowboarders--to send a message that reckless skiing will not be tolerated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 2012 | By Joe Mozingo, Los Angeles Times
The federal government is moving to shut down the nation's largest and highest-profile medical marijuana dispensary operation, filing papers to seize properties in Oakland and San Jose where Harborside Health Center does business. Copies of the federal Complaint for Forfeiture were taped to the front doors of the two dispensaries Tuesday, alleging that they were "operating in violation of federal law. " Medical marijuana advocates, as well as some state and local officials, decried the action, saying it hurts patients in legitimate need of the drug and breaks repeated promises by President Obama's Justice Department that it was targeting only operations near schools and parks or otherwise in violation of the state's laws.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
A bill that would allow self-driving cars on California's roads may improve traffic safety but it does not do enough to protect privacy, a consumer group said. The bill, SB 1298, sponsored by state Sen. Alex Padilla (D-Pacoima), is awaiting Assembly consideration in June. It establishes guidelines for "autonomous vehicles" to be tested and operated in California. So far, it has flown through the Legislature, passing the Senate unanimously in mid-May. Tech giant Google Inc., Caltech and other organizations have been working to develop such vehicles, which use radar, video cameras and lasers to navigate roads and stay safe in traffic without human assistance.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2012 | By Jerry Hirsch, Los Angeles Times
A bill that would allow self-driving cars on California's roads has passed the California Senate. The bill, SB1298, sponsored by Sen. Alex Padilla (D-Pacoima), establishes guidelines for "autonomous vehicles" to be tested and operated in California. The bill now goes to the Assembly for consideration next month. Tech giant Google Inc., Caltech and other organizations have been working to develop such vehicles, which use radar, video cameras and lasers to navigate roads and stay safe in traffic without human assistance.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan
NASA has taken the next small step toward reshaping its future in space travel by awarding five contracts worth as much as $250 million to aerospace companies for researching and developing propulsion systems. Although NASA hasn't laid out how it will use such technology, officials from the contract winners -- three of which are based in California -- say they envision their work being used on a broad range of missions: sending research equipment deep into space; building thrust engines for robotic Mars landers; or developing boosters for spacecraft to explore far-flung asteroids.
NATIONAL
October 23, 2009 | Josh Meyer
Drug agents swept through Los Angeles and dozens of other locations Wednesday and Thursday, arresting more than 300 people and seizing large quantities of drugs, weapons and money in the biggest U.S. crackdown against a Mexican drug cartel. The months-long offensive, the fruit of dozens of federal investigations over the last 3 1/2 years, will put a significant dent in the U.S. operations of La Familia Michoacana, one of Mexico's fastest-growing and deadliest cartels, authorities said.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2009 | Martin Zimmerman and Ken Bensinger
Toyota Motor Corp. appears to be moving closer to shuttering California's last auto plant. The Japanese automaker plans to start talks next week that could dissolve New United Motor Manufacturing Inc., or NUMMI, which opened in Fremont in 1984 as a 50-50 joint venture of Toyota and then-General Motors Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2002 | MARK ARAX and ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
From its gated headquarters in the suburbs here, the Britz family runs a farming behemoth with arms that stretch across the vast middle of California. It is a multimillion-dollar empire that includes a petrochemical company, packinghouses, a cotton gin and tens of thousands of acres of irrigated cropland. But the Britzes--whose houses sit amid country clubs and not cotton fields--also get a big helping hand from Uncle Sam. Their 14 separate farming entities have collected $4.
MAGAZINE
October 2, 1994 | AMY WALLACE, Times staff writer Amy Wallace is covering the California gubernatorial campaign. Her last article for the magazine profiled videodating king Jeffrey Ullman
To understand political consultant Clinton Reilly--the hard-charging, number-crunching, message-honing, score-evening, candidate-firing, vitriol-spewing millionaire who is running Democrat Kathleen Brown's campaign for governor--the autumn of 1993 is a good place to start. One year before Election Day, Reilly was looking for work. Fresh from Los Angeles, where he had helped Richard Riordan beat the odds and become mayor, the San Francisco-based strategist had no major California clients.
NATIONAL
February 10, 2008 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
A lawsuit filed in federal court last week alleges that a company that purports to offer legal services to low-income people nationwide instead preys on them. According to the suit filed in Denver, the victims had asked for assistance from Legal Aid National Services of Aurora, Colo. -- or one of a dozen related entities -- thinking that they were dealing with a legitimate provider of services for low-income persons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2003 | Carl Ingram, Times Staff Writer
A "three strikes" bill that would prohibit companies with multiple convictions from doing business in California was launched in the Senate on Tuesday. Sen. Gloria Romero (D-Los Angeles) said her plan would provide a new level of safety for the public from corporate crimes in the same way that the state's three-strikes law makes citizens safer from other types of criminals. Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee agreed.
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