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Operation Cleansweep

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1991
Readers should know that an article on graffiti ("Getting Graffiti Off the Wall," July 28) left out some information. Los Angeles offers a $1,000 reward for the apprehension and conviction of persons engaged in graffiti vandalism. Since I authored this motion last year, more than one dozen citizens have collected the reward. Additionally, more than 1,000 anti-graffiti signs have been posted by neighborhood organizations through another of my council motions. We have an additional 1,000 signs available for placement.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1992 | MICHAEL CONNELLY
Los Angeles police and community volunteers will conduct "Operation Clean Sweep" in Pacoima's main commercial district Saturday. Beginning at 10 a.m., police officers, city employees and volunteers will begin clearing trash and other debris from Van Nuys Boulevard in an area stretching several blocks north and south of San Fernando Road, Police Capt. Gabe Ornelas said. "It is the central business district for the area and we are really trying to enhance it," Ornelas said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1991 | BETH HAWKINS and PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Express Mail package sent from South Pasadena contained what looked like 100 sugar cookies. But sugar wasn't what quickly drew the attention of the police dog. The "cookies," in fact, were patties of crack cocaine--$300,000 worth. So when they were delivered to an apartment in Omaha, the "mailman" had a surprise for the woman who signed for them--a warrant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles' first citywide survey of graffiti damage found that 2,300 single family homes, 2,200 apartments and 2,400 commercial buildings had been marred, officials said Monday. The highest concentrations appear to be in South-Central and East Los Angeles, and in Pacoima in the San Fernando Valley, according to a two-month survey by meter readers working for the Department of Water and Power. Each of those communities had at least 300 graffiti occurrences per ZIP code area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1991 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles' first citywide survey of graffiti damage found that 2,300 single family homes, 2,200 apartments and 2,400 commercial buildings had been marred, officials said Monday. The highest concentrations appear to be in South-Central and East Los Angeles, and in Pacoima in the San Fernando Valley, according to a two-month survey by meter readers working for the Department of Water and Power. Each of those communities had at least 300 graffiti occurrences per ZIP code area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 1992 | MICHAEL CONNELLY
Los Angeles police and community volunteers will conduct "Operation Clean Sweep" in Pacoima's main commercial district Saturday. Beginning at 10 a.m., police officers, city employees and volunteers will begin clearing trash and other debris from Van Nuys Boulevard in an area stretching several blocks north and south of San Fernando Road, Police Capt. Gabe Ornelas said. "It is the central business district for the area and we are really trying to enhance it," Ornelas said.
NEWS
October 7, 1988 | From Reuters
A joint British, Dutch and Belgian minesweeping force has begun its final operation in the Persian Gulf and will return home in January, a Dutch Defense Ministry spokesman said Thursday. The spokesman said the force, which has been in the gulf for the past year to ensure safe shipping, launched "Operation Cleansweep" in the south of the waterway this week in a last effort to find mines laid during the Iran-Iraq War.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1990
In response to "With Aid Pledge, Kohl Tries to Show Germany Is Dependable" (Part A, Sept. 17): Chancellor Helmut Kohl belatedly and begrudgingly announced increased West German assistance toward the Persian Gulf effort. He has been occupied with the extraordinary political and economic considerations of German unification (no small task). The reality that German help primarily takes the form of financial support is not surprising. West Germany is Europe's richest nation. However, as the article rightly suggests, a precedent exists for German out-of-area participation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1993 | Researched and written by CHIP JOHNSON / Los Angeles Times
The graffiti war is being waged on many fronts, from private organizations to the state Capitol. The Epple bill, now in the Senate, takes ideas from a number of graffiti bills. The bill, AB 1179 by Assemblyman Bob Epple (D-Cerritos), provides a three-year prison sentence for taggers arrested three times and imposes stiff penalties for vandalizing public property.Taggers nabbed with chisels, drill bits and other tools used for etching could be fined $1,000 and sent to jail fr six months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1992 | JOHN SCHWADA and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The city's 2-year-old graffiti reward program is almost bankrupt, forcing Los Angeles officials to scramble for new funding to compensate people who aid in apprehending the relentless taggers. Trying to revive a program that has only $1,300 in cash, a City Council panel will consider proposals today that would both reduce the size of individual rewards from $1,000 to $500 and appeal to business leaders to help finance the fund. The program's financial difficulties could not come at a worse time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1991
Readers should know that an article on graffiti ("Getting Graffiti Off the Wall," July 28) left out some information. Los Angeles offers a $1,000 reward for the apprehension and conviction of persons engaged in graffiti vandalism. Since I authored this motion last year, more than one dozen citizens have collected the reward. Additionally, more than 1,000 anti-graffiti signs have been posted by neighborhood organizations through another of my council motions. We have an additional 1,000 signs available for placement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1991 | BETH HAWKINS and PAUL LIEBERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Express Mail package sent from South Pasadena contained what looked like 100 sugar cookies. But sugar wasn't what quickly drew the attention of the police dog. The "cookies," in fact, were patties of crack cocaine--$300,000 worth. So when they were delivered to an apartment in Omaha, the "mailman" had a surprise for the woman who signed for them--a warrant.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1993 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the Old West, it would have been the showdown on Main Street, where the outlaws are confronted by the brave if foolhardy townspeople. In the modern day San Fernando Valley, however, the outlaws were taggers and the townspeople were graffiti-haters who acknowledged that they didn't know the difference among the good, the bad and the ugly. Moreover, they didn't care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1993 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the Old West, it would have been the showdown on Main Street, where the outlaws are confronted by the brave if foolhardy townspeople. In modern day Mission Hills, however, the outlaws were taggers and the townspeople were graffiti-haters who acknowledged that they didn't know the difference among the good, the bad and the ugly. Moreover, they didn't care.
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