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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1989 | DARRELL DAWSEY, Times Staff Writer
About 15,000 feet above Los Angeles, Bill Ward and Mike Werner rush to get the city to work on time. Slipping through smoggy morning skies in their California Highway Patrol chopper, the two officers scan the snarls that paralyze stretches of the city's busiest freeways, their eyes hunting for the impediments that can transform the freeways into linear parking lots. Three miles below and nearly 10 miles west, CHP Officer Tyrone Johnson launches a similar hunt--his from the heart of the snarls.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
September 19, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A gun-trafficking investigation on the Southwest border that went awry was a "significant danger to public safety," according to an independent government report that recommended that the Department of Justice consider disciplining 14 officials, from field agents in Arizona to top managers in Washington. Less than an hour after those findings were announced, two of the officials - Kenneth E. Melson, the former acting head of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives; and Deputy Assistant Atty.
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NEWS
March 21, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
A citizen's group that dumped cow manure in a park last month, hoping the stench would drive out drug dealers, gave away 15,000 pounds of manure Saturday to dozens of other city activists who immediately started similar anti-drug crusades. "We want to take back our streets and our parks and let the drug dealers and addicts know what we think of them," said Harald Martin, event organizer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2007 | Christine Hanley, Times Staff Writer
After being accused of shaking a baby boy to death last October, neighborhood day-care operator Lorrie Mae Stoddard lost her livelihood, her standing in the community and many nights of sleep. On Tuesday, immediately after prosecutors told a judge there was no evidence to back up the charges and the case was dismissed, the Cypress woman was too choked up to talk. "I need to get out of here," she told reporters, weeping uncontrollably while being comforted by her attorney.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1992 | MARTHA M. HAMILTON, WASHINGTON POST
The Department of Transportation Monday gave tentative antitrust clearance that would let KLM Royal Dutch Airlines and financially troubled Northwest Airlines Inc. operate as if they were a single airline. The DOT issued a show-cause order asking for comment on both sides of the issue but said that the proposed agreement between the two airlines appeared to benefit the public.
NATIONAL
September 19, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - A gun-trafficking investigation on the Southwest border that went awry was a "significant danger to public safety," according to an independent government report that recommended that the Department of Justice consider disciplining 14 officials, from field agents in Arizona to top managers in Washington. Less than an hour after those findings were announced, two of the officials - Kenneth E. Melson, the former acting head of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives; and Deputy Assistant Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1998 | RALPH PETERS, Ralph Peters is a retired Army officer and the author of "Fighting for the Future: Will America Triumph?" to be published in March
The United States has attacked Iraq. Leaving aside politically charged skepticism as to the timing of our strike, the basic question is: Will our military action make a meaningful and constructive difference in the Persian Gulf? Or is America just throwing a strategic tantrum? I served in uniform for more than two decades. I believe that there are times when we have no choice but to use our military. But I also believe that our armed forces should be employed soberly and reluctantly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2007 | Christine Hanley, Times Staff Writer
After being accused of shaking a baby boy to death last October, neighborhood day-care operator Lorrie Mae Stoddard lost her livelihood, her standing in the community and many nights of sleep. On Tuesday, immediately after prosecutors told a judge there was no evidence to back up the charges and the case was dismissed, the Cypress woman was too choked up to talk. "I need to get out of here," she told reporters, weeping uncontrollably while being comforted by her attorney.
NEWS
July 1, 1989 | From United Press International
Former Philippine President Ferdinand E. Marcos remained semi-comatose and on a dialysis machine Friday after removal of a malfunctioning transplanted kidney, a hospital official said. "The condition has not worsened since yesterday (Thursday). He remains semi-comatose, but is responding to pain, but not command," Eugene Tiwanak, St. Francis Medical Center assistant administrator, said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014 | By Jason Wells
The Dumb Starbucks parody store in Los Feliz that caused a spectacle before it was shut down by county health officials for operating without the proper permit isn't expected to reopen any time soon. Little more than three days after quietly opening, Nathan Fielder -- whose "Nathan for You" show airs on Comedy Central -- addressed the growing buzz Monday and revealed he was behind the parody during a news conference. But the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health shut down the store, which had a limited menu and other nonfood items, for not having a health permit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1998 | RALPH PETERS, Ralph Peters is a retired Army officer and the author of "Fighting for the Future: Will America Triumph?" to be published in March
The United States has attacked Iraq. Leaving aside politically charged skepticism as to the timing of our strike, the basic question is: Will our military action make a meaningful and constructive difference in the Persian Gulf? Or is America just throwing a strategic tantrum? I served in uniform for more than two decades. I believe that there are times when we have no choice but to use our military. But I also believe that our armed forces should be employed soberly and reluctantly.
NEWS
March 21, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
A citizen's group that dumped cow manure in a park last month, hoping the stench would drive out drug dealers, gave away 15,000 pounds of manure Saturday to dozens of other city activists who immediately started similar anti-drug crusades. "We want to take back our streets and our parks and let the drug dealers and addicts know what we think of them," said Harald Martin, event organizer.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1992 | MARTHA M. HAMILTON, WASHINGTON POST
The Department of Transportation Monday gave tentative antitrust clearance that would let KLM Royal Dutch Airlines and financially troubled Northwest Airlines Inc. operate as if they were a single airline. The DOT issued a show-cause order asking for comment on both sides of the issue but said that the proposed agreement between the two airlines appeared to benefit the public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1989 | DARRELL DAWSEY, Times Staff Writer
About 15,000 feet above Los Angeles, Bill Ward and Mike Werner rush to get the city to work on time. Slipping through smoggy morning skies in their California Highway Patrol chopper, the two officers scan the snarls that paralyze stretches of the city's busiest freeways, their eyes hunting for the impediments that can transform the freeways into linear parking lots. Three miles below and nearly 10 miles west, CHP Officer Tyrone Johnson launches a similar hunt--his from the heart of the snarls.
MAGAZINE
April 24, 1988 | John Eisendrath, John Eisendrath is a Los Angeles writer
AT 4:56 P.M. ON MAY 1, 1987, William Dillon entered Junior's Deli on Westwood Boulevard, sat in a booth and learned he was going to be assassinated. Leonard Swirda ordered French fries and gave him the bad news. "I'll say, 'Let's not talk here . . . ,' " Swirda said, describing how the hit would take place at a future date. "We go out to the car, I put a gun to your head, and I shoot you and throw you in the trunk, drive you to the desert, dig a hole and throw you in it.
BUSINESS
July 23, 2002 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Randy Michaels, a former "shock jock" who became perhaps the nation's most powerful radio executive as head of Clear Channel Communications Inc.'s 1,200 radio stations, will step aside to head a newly created think tank for the company that will focus on emerging wireless and satellite technologies. Michaels attended a meeting with Clear Channel President Mark Mays, and "the conversations led to Randy making the decision to move on to this new area," said company spokeswoman Diane Warren.
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