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Operation Cul De Sac

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1991 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of the Community Youth Gang Services Project on Wednesday demanded that a black community newspaper retract a commentary that accused the respected anti-gang organization of operating a "snitch network" for police. The organization's youth counselors have received two threats--including one involving an alleged bomb--that may be related to the article published in the Los Angeles Sentinel on June 20, said Steve Valdivia, executive director of the gang project.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1991 | RICK HOLGUIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The head of the Community Youth Gang Services Project on Wednesday demanded that a black community newspaper retract a commentary that accused the respected anti-gang organization of operating a "snitch network" for police. The organization's youth counselors have received two threats--including one involving an alleged bomb--that may be related to the article published in the Los Angeles Sentinel on June 20, said Steve Valdivia, executive director of the gang project.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1991 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial anti-crime project that involved erecting barricades around a South-Central Los Angeles neighborhood and then saturating the area with police officers was declared "the most progressive community-based policing program in the nation" Tuesday by a California State University researcher. James R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1991 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't so long ago that Yvonne Soublet would wake up in the middle of the night to the sound of gunfire or the screeching wheels of a speeding car. One night she watched in horror as two rival gangs battled in an intersection near her South-Central Los Angeles home. "They were dragging their buddy into the car, and they raced off with him," Soublet recalled Friday. "There was blood everywhere."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1991 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't so long ago that Yvonne Soublet would wake up in the middle of the night to the sound of gunfire or the screeching wheels of a speeding car. One night she watched in horror as two rival gangs battled in an intersection near her South-Central Los Angeles home. "They were dragging their buddy into the car, and they raced off with him," Soublet recalled Friday. "There was blood everywhere."
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saul J. Hill, who has spent 50 of his 91 years in the crowded blue-collar neighborhood near Jefferson High School in Los Angeles, did a spry little dance there Wednesday on 40th Place, a street plagued by drug sales and gang gunfire. Wearing a ball cap and tennis shoes, Hill was looking excited and optimistic on a block that had been, to some extent, under siege.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1990 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saul J. Hill, who has spent 50 of his 91 years in the crowded blue-collar neighborhood near Jefferson High School in Los Angeles, did a spry little dance there Wednesday on 40th Place, a street plagued by drug sales and gang gunfire. Wearing a ball cap and tennis shoes, Hill was looking excited and optimistic on a block that had been, to some extent, under siege.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1990 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a gritty South-Central neighborhood that reported more drive-by shootings last year than any other in the city, the Los Angeles Police Department has begun shedding its hard-nosed "Dragnet" image for a folksy approach more akin to "Mayberry RFD."
OPINION
May 13, 1990 | JAMES LASLEY, James Lasley is assistant professor of criminal justice at Cal State Fullerton
Ask any criminologist about how the police fit into today's street-gang problem and the likely answer will be that strong-arm police tactics, at best, won't accomplish anything. Recent data shows, however, that street-gang violence is, in fact, declining in targeted areas--in some cases dramatically--and that police "crackdowns" have played a significant role in bringing this about.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1990
Your article "Fight Against Gangs Turns to Social Solution" (Part A, Nov. 11) leaves me troubled. First, you suggest the Los Angeles Police Department's approach to the problem has been singular, focusing on massive, tough law-enforcement operations. That is not completely accurate. Operation Hammer is one of our important strategies that has indeed proven effective, but we clearly recognize that it is only one of our tools. Traditional tough law enforcement is one tool, but we recognize the absolute necessity of other strategies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1991 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial anti-crime project that involved erecting barricades around a South-Central Los Angeles neighborhood and then saturating the area with police officers was declared "the most progressive community-based policing program in the nation" Tuesday by a California State University researcher. James R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1990 | JESSE KATZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a gritty South-Central neighborhood that reported more drive-by shootings last year than any other in the city, the Los Angeles Police Department has begun shedding its hard-nosed "Dragnet" image for a folksy approach more akin to "Mayberry RFD."
NEWS
February 22, 1990 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saul J. Hill, who has spent 50 of his 91 years in the crowded blue-collar neighborhood near Jefferson High School in Los Angeles, did a spry little dance there Wednesday on 40th Place, a street plagued by drug sales and gang gunfire. Wearing a ball cap and tennis shoes, Hill was looking excited and optimistic on a block that had been, to some extent, under siege.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1990 | DAVID FERRELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saul J. Hill, who has spent 50 of his 91 years in the crowded blue-collar neighborhood near Jefferson High School in Los Angeles, did a spry little dance there Wednesday on 40th Place, a street plagued by drug sales and gang gunfire. Wearing a ball cap and tennis shoes, Hill was looking excited and optimistic on a block that had been, to some extent, under siege.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1990 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles authorities may be in the process of disproving the political maxim of Philadelphia's controversial former mayor, Frank Rizzo, who once noted that the streets in his city were safe; it was people who made them unsafe. In recent experiments, police officials have built concrete barricades in crime-ridden Los Angeles neighborhoods, turning streets into cul-de-sacs. Changing the streets, it turns out, appears to reduce random crimes, drug transactions and drive-by shootings.
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