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Operation Infinite Justice

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2001
While "Operation Infinite Justice" was a bad cover name for our fight against terrorism, "Operation Enduring Freedom" is worse. It is unfortunate that the PR folks have gotten hold of the development of public code names ever since the 1989 "Just Cause" invasion of Panama. But if the name has to convey a message, at least make it a clear one. "Enduring Freedom" sounds like freedom is something that has to be patiently tolerated, rather than a cherished human right. John Maloney Anaheim In lieu of Operation Infinite Justice, how about Operation Hide and Seek?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2001
While "Operation Infinite Justice" was a bad cover name for our fight against terrorism, "Operation Enduring Freedom" is worse. It is unfortunate that the PR folks have gotten hold of the development of public code names ever since the 1989 "Just Cause" invasion of Panama. But if the name has to convey a message, at least make it a clear one. "Enduring Freedom" sounds like freedom is something that has to be patiently tolerated, rather than a cherished human right. John Maloney Anaheim In lieu of Operation Infinite Justice, how about Operation Hide and Seek?
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NEWS
September 21, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United States will target and attempt to destroy terrorist organizations that played no direct role in the attacks on New York and the Pentagon once it finishes with Osama bin Laden and his network, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell said Thursday.
OPINION
January 18, 2005 | Michael Keane, Michael Keane is the author of the Dictionary of Modern Strategy and Tactics, which will be published by the Naval Institute Press. He lectures at USC's Marshall School of Business.
Words go to war as surely as soldiers do. They can be used to inspire troops, strike fear into the heart of the enemy or persuade neutral parties. "You know what words can do to soldiers," Napoleon once wrote to one of his generals. And since 9/11, language has been a central battlefield in the global war on terrorism. The recent confirmation hearings for Alberto R. Gonzales, President Bush's attorney general nominee, highlighted the uses and abuses of words in war.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2001 | STEVE LOPEZ
Twice now while following the news of the war, I've had to pinch myself. The first time was when the Bush administration, perhaps inspired by the HBO series "Band of Brothers," decided we needed a working title for the bombardment of Afghanistan. They came up with Operation Infinite Justice, but that was dumped in favor of Operation Enduring Freedom.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2003 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
We've got "Winnebagos of Death," HooAH! bars, "shock and awe," freedom fries and cheese-eating surrender monkeys. The "coalition of the willing" (often pronounced as one word) will be taking on the "axis of evil" and all its WMD (that would be weapons of mass destruction) and if it is not the "mother of all wars" as it was in 1991, well, the "mother of all bombs" may well make an appearance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2001 | JOHN J. THATAMANIL, John J. Thatamanil is an assistant professor of religious studies at Millsaps College, Jackson, Miss
Religious questions, if not commitments, regularly surface in times of duress. The terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 have led record numbers of people searching for answers to churches, mosques and synagogues. This conflict has been fraught with religious connotations from its very inception.
OPINION
October 7, 2001 | DAVID CORN, David Corn, Washington editor of The Nation, is author of the novel "Deep Background."
Ever since the Sept. 11 attack, President Bush has tried to universalize his war on terrorism, casting it not merely as a campaign against the plotters and their supporters, but as a global struggle for freedom. It's not that he needs to persuade the American public that a reprisal is warranted; polls indicate overwhelming support for military action.
OPINION
September 30, 2001 | CHALMERS JOHNSON, Chalmers Johnson is author of "Revolutionary Change" and "Blowback: The Costs and Consequences of American Empire."
One of the objectives of terrorism is to provoke the ruling elites of a target regime into disastrous overreaction. When it works, as it has in Israel over the past year, the results can be devastating for all sides. Who does this ultimately benefit? The terrorists. Carlos Marighella, the Brazilian guerrilla leader whose writings influenced political terrorists in the 1960s and 1970s, explained why.
NEWS
September 21, 2001 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Army began moving ground troops to within striking distance of Afghanistan on Thursday as a massive deployment of warplanes, ships, equipment and personnel moved into its second day. Army Secretary Thomas E. White, the Army's top civilian official, said it is "ready to conduct sustained land combat operations" in the Persian Gulf region.
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