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Operation Noble Eagle

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September 17, 2001 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The military plan to protect the domestic shores of the United States is still nascent and sketchy, but it already has a patriotic name: Operation Noble Eagle. Veterans say that in the modern military world, names such as this one, evoking a confident, predatory force overhead, are selected with great calculation.
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NEWS
September 17, 2001 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The military plan to protect the domestic shores of the United States is still nascent and sketchy, but it already has a patriotic name: Operation Noble Eagle. Veterans say that in the modern military world, names such as this one, evoking a confident, predatory force overhead, are selected with great calculation.
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NEWS
February 17, 2002 | MARIA ELENA FERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
High above the clouds, the view is the only thing that remains the same--Earth's curvature on the horizon, the beautiful orange sunsets over the Pacific, the snow-capped Sierra. But in these days of heightened security and terrorist alerts, 100 fighter jets have joined the airliners that travel the nation's skyways. For fighter pilots such as Maj.
NEWS
March 19, 2002 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pentagon will scale back the combat air patrols flying over Washington, New York and other major U.S. cities since Sept. 11, but will maintain planes and crews ready to fly across the nation, officials said Monday. Citing the high cost of the flights, the drain on Air Force resources and the unlikelihood that the patrols could deter another air attack on the U.S. homeland, officials said it is possible that patrols over New York will stop altogether.
NEWS
December 2, 2001 | JOHN CURRAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
From his cockpit perch more than 15,000 feet up, F-16 pilot Maj. Steve Ziomek can see it all--the Statue of Liberty, Central Park, Yankee Stadium. But it's the gap in the cluster of skyscrapers in lower Manhattan--the former site of the World Trade Center towers--that steels his resolve on his combat air patrols. "I'm up here to make sure nothing like that ever happens again," Ziomek says, talking through a microphone built into the mask of his helmet. Ziomek, 34, a veteran U.S.
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