Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsOperation Push Inc
IN THE NEWS

Operation Push Inc

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 5, 1987
Operation PUSH Inc. faces a financial crisis, according to a recently filed audit, but leaders of the Chicago-based civil rights organization said that finances were improving and that they intended to stay in business. They also contended that PUSH, which was founded by the Rev.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 1, 1991 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A week after Operation PUSH laid off its entire staff because of financial difficulties, the Rev. Jesse Jackson said Thursday that the civil rights organization he founded 20 years ago would continue operating, thanks to an economic bailout by black churches and businesses. Jackson said businesses had contributed or pledged $150,000 at a meeting earlier in the day and another $100,000 had been pledged by about 75 ministers who met at a Chicago church the previous night.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Operation PUSH is intensifying its boycott of Nike Inc. products despite Nike's promise to pursue affirmative action goals more aggressively, PUSH Executive Director Tyrone Crider said Saturday. "We're going to boycott until they make a commitment to more jobs in our community," Crider said in a fiery speech to about 400 supporters at PUSH headquarters. "Nike said no to us! We're saying no to Nike!" Nike Chairman Philip H.
NEWS
January 25, 1991 | United Press International
Financial troubles have hit Operation PUSH, the civil rights organization founded in 1971 by the Rev. Jesse Jackson, prompting the temporary furlough of all employees of the PUSH national office, a spokeswoman said Thursday. The 10 to 15 staff members in the office were furloughed as of Tuesday, but 70% volunteered to work without pay to keep the office and services running, Stephanie Gadlin said.
NEWS
February 1, 1991 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A week after Operation PUSH laid off its entire staff because of financial difficulties, the Rev. Jesse Jackson said Thursday that the civil rights organization he founded 20 years ago would continue operating, thanks to an economic bailout by black churches and businesses. Jackson said businesses had contributed or pledged $150,000 at a meeting earlier in the day and another $100,000 had been pledged by about 75 ministers who met at a Chicago church the previous night.
NEWS
January 25, 1991 | United Press International
Financial troubles have hit Operation PUSH, the civil rights organization founded in 1971 by the Rev. Jesse Jackson, prompting the temporary furlough of all employees of the PUSH national office, a spokeswoman said Thursday. The 10 to 15 staff members in the office were furloughed as of Tuesday, but 70% volunteered to work without pay to keep the office and services running, Stephanie Gadlin said.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh told a civil rights group Tuesday that the Bush Administration would not back efforts in Congress to reverse recent Supreme Court rulings that critics contend have crippled affirmative action programs and other minority protections. Speaking to the annual convention of Operation PUSH in this Chicago suburb, Thornburgh said the controversial decisions appear to be largely technical in nature and narrowly drawn and should not have a wide-ranging impact on efforts to promote equal employment opportunities.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON and BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The shoving match between Operation PUSH and Nike Inc. took an unexpected turn Friday when Nike, apparently bowing to pressure, announced aggressive new affirmative action goals. PUSH, the civil rights organization founded by the Rev. Jesse Jackson, had announced a national boycott of Nike products a week ago, charging that Nike receives 30% of its $6.8-billion athletic shoe revenue from blacks, yet invests little in the black community and has no high-level black employees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1990 | DARRELL DAWSEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hunched over a two-foot-high mound of Nike athletic wear Friday, U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters did some brief sole searching. Rifling quickly through the pile, Waters (D-Los Angeles) pulled out a long, scuffed pair of running shoes and placed them at the top. "These are my husband's," she said, "and I want to make sure they burn."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1990 | DARRELL DAWSEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hunched over a two-foot-high mound of Nike athletic wear Friday, U.S. Rep. Maxine Waters did some brief sole searching. Rifling quickly through the pile, Waters (D-Los Angeles) pulled out a long, scuffed pair of running shoes and placed them at the top. "These are my husband's," she said, "and I want to make sure they burn."
BUSINESS
August 25, 1990 | STUART WASSERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Karl Colbert accompanied his friend shopping at the Nike shoe factory outlet near downtown here Wednesday, unfazed by the recent call for a national boycott of Nike products. "I like Nikes, and I don't like other people telling me what to do," said the black 14-year-old Jefferson High School student. The boycott call by the Chicago-based civil rights organization Operation PUSH has so far fallen flat in Portland, the home of Nike Corp., the largest manufacturer of athletic shoes in the nation.
NEWS
August 19, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Operation PUSH is intensifying its boycott of Nike Inc. products despite Nike's promise to pursue affirmative action goals more aggressively, PUSH Executive Director Tyrone Crider said Saturday. "We're going to boycott until they make a commitment to more jobs in our community," Crider said in a fiery speech to about 400 supporters at PUSH headquarters. "Nike said no to us! We're saying no to Nike!" Nike Chairman Philip H.
BUSINESS
August 18, 1990 | ERIC HARRISON and BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The shoving match between Operation PUSH and Nike Inc. took an unexpected turn Friday when Nike, apparently bowing to pressure, announced aggressive new affirmative action goals. PUSH, the civil rights organization founded by the Rev. Jesse Jackson, had announced a national boycott of Nike products a week ago, charging that Nike receives 30% of its $6.8-billion athletic shoe revenue from blacks, yet invests little in the black community and has no high-level black employees.
NEWS
June 28, 1989 | BOB SECTER, Times Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh told a civil rights group Tuesday that the Bush Administration would not back efforts in Congress to reverse recent Supreme Court rulings that critics contend have crippled affirmative action programs and other minority protections. Speaking to the annual convention of Operation PUSH in this Chicago suburb, Thornburgh said the controversial decisions appear to be largely technical in nature and narrowly drawn and should not have a wide-ranging impact on efforts to promote equal employment opportunities.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1990 | STUART WASSERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Karl Colbert accompanied his friend shopping at the Nike shoe factory outlet near downtown here Wednesday, unfazed by the recent call for a national boycott of Nike products. "I like Nikes, and I don't like other people telling me what to do," said the black 14-year-old Jefferson High School student. The boycott call by the Chicago-based civil rights organization Operation PUSH has so far fallen flat in Portland, the home of Nike Corp., the largest manufacturer of athletic shoes in the nation.
NEWS
July 5, 1987
Operation PUSH Inc. faces a financial crisis, according to a recently filed audit, but leaders of the Chicago-based civil rights organization said that finances were improving and that they intended to stay in business. They also contended that PUSH, which was founded by the Rev.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|