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Operation Sunrise

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1995
Your April 20 article, "Street Gang Crackdown Producing Mixed Results," contains inaccuracies and unfortunate misstatements of the outcome and effect of Operation Sunrise. However, before correcting these inaccuracies, I feel compelled to paint a picture of the affected area which resulted in the strategic design of Operation Sunrise. The operation targeted one of the most violent street gangs in Los Angeles if not the entire country. The territory this gang claims as their own is a 30-by-30 block area housing approximately 44,000 people who live, work, raise families and live in fear of violent gang members.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1998
A federal appeals court has reinstated a lawsuit filed by a South-Central Los Angeles woman who claimed that Los Angeles police officers trashed her apartment during a crackdown on violent street gangs, known as Operation Sunrise. Betty Jones' residence on West 85th Street was one of 97 homes raided by more than 200 police and FBI agents on April 1, 1995 in an operation aimed primarily at the Eight-Tray Gangster Crips.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1998
A federal appeals court has reinstated a lawsuit filed by a South-Central Los Angeles woman who claimed that Los Angeles police officers trashed her apartment during a crackdown on violent street gangs, known as Operation Sunrise. Betty Jones' residence on West 85th Street was one of 97 homes raided by more than 200 police and FBI agents on April 1, 1995 in an operation aimed primarily at the Eight-Tray Gangster Crips.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1995
Your April 20 article, "Street Gang Crackdown Producing Mixed Results," contains inaccuracies and unfortunate misstatements of the outcome and effect of Operation Sunrise. However, before correcting these inaccuracies, I feel compelled to paint a picture of the affected area which resulted in the strategic design of Operation Sunrise. The operation targeted one of the most violent street gangs in Los Angeles if not the entire country. The territory this gang claims as their own is a 30-by-30 block area housing approximately 44,000 people who live, work, raise families and live in fear of violent gang members.
NEWS
October 25, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 1,500 fugitives described as the "worst of the worst" were seized in a 10-week manhunt that was one of the largest roundups in the nation's history, officials in New York said. Officers from 65 law enforcement agencies sought out violent criminals--many of them escapees--in Miami, Atlanta, Boston, Baltimore, Washington and New York. The roundup was called Operation Sunrise because many of the arrests occurred in the morning when the fugitives were in bed and unarmed, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1995
Nine alleged Los Angeles street gang members, including four men described as members of a South-Central gang targeted in a highly publicized April 1 crackdown, have been indicted on federal weapons and drug charges, authorities said. Laquwan Kenay Riley, 22, was charged with robbing a confidential informant of $4,800 and firing a handgun at him in April, 1992. Curtis James Jackson, 38, also known as James Wilson or K.C., was accused of possession with intent to sell up to 16.
NEWS
April 20, 1995 | PAUL FELDMAN and EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than two weeks after the largest street gang crackdown of its kind in Los Angeles history, only one of the 63 people arrested by an 800-member law enforcement task force has been charged with a violent felony, according to records released by authorities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 2000 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles police sergeant facing a criminal trial in the Rampart corruption scandal took the witness stand in federal court Friday in a separate civil rights lawsuit in which he and other officers are accused of trashing a South-Central woman's home. To protect the officer's 5th Amendment right against forced self-incrimination, U.S. District Judge Consuelo B. Marshall directed attorneys not to ask Sgt. Edward Ortiz any questions related to the Rampart case.
NEWS
October 20, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Service Reports
A thick layer of evening fog gave more than 900 firefighters a respite in their battle against a stubborn brush fire that broke out two days ago at Camp Pendleton and had burned into Orange, Riverside and San Diego counties. "It's just lying real low today," said U.S. Forest Service spokeswoman Delores Fremter. "When the winds kick up in the afternoon, we'll see where it goes."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1995 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police Chief Willie L. Williams defended last month's massive crackdown on alleged gang members, telling South-Central Los Angeles residents Monday night it is outrageous that such a small group is responsible for as much as 85% of violent crimes in their neighborhood. Williams said the raids, called Operation Sunrise, no more targeted South-Central because it is largely black than arrests of alleged Mexican Mafia members last weekend targeted Mexican American neighborhoods.
NEWS
April 2, 1995 | JIM NEWTON and JOHN L. MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a massive law enforcement operation aimed at breaking the back of one of Los Angeles' most notorious street gangs, more than 800 police officers and FBI agents swarmed through South-Central and other communities Saturday morning, making 60 arrests, impounding dozens of guns and seizing large amounts of cocaine. "We talk about Beirut," Los Angeles Police Chief Willie L.
OPINION
December 14, 1986 | Richard Harris Smith, Richard Harris Smith, author of "The OSS," is working on a biography of Allen Dulles
"Great secrecy was necessary," Winston Churchill told a cheering Parliament, as he revealed the first Nazi surrender at the close of World War II, capitulation in Italy. It followed months of top-secret talks between German commanders and Office of Strategic Services "spy master" Allen Dulles, later the celebrated director of the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency.
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