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BUSINESS
January 24, 2013 | By David Colker
So, you have a time-share to unload and a friendly salesperson calls to say he has a buyer. In fact, the caller can handle everything for you, including the Federal Trade Commission approval of the sale. All you have to do is pay a $3,000 deposit, to be refunded when the transaction is complete. Except that you never hear from the salesperson again. And by the way, the FTC does not review or approve time-share transactions. But the FTC did take action against the operators of a company it accused of pulling off that scam, taking in millions of dollars.
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WORLD
April 23, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko and Carol J. Williams
DONETSK, Ukraine - Ukrainian government troops on Wednesday claimed to have swept out pro-Russia gunmen from a town in embattled eastern Ukraine, an operation the Kremlin warned could spark retaliation. The Ukrainian Interior Ministry statement that Svyatogorsk was under government control was dismissed as "a propaganda lie" by a leader of insurgents holding nearby Slovyansk, scene of the most violent and destabilizing clashes of the separatist movement that has been gaining momentum since Russia's annexation of Crimea last month.
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OPINION
June 25, 2012
As the July 1 date draws near for the scheduled closure of up to 70 state parks, deals are being made to keep the gates open. When the dust settles, none of the targeted parks may actually have to close this year. But that doesn't mean they're saved either. Many of the agreements to keep them operating - whether by having local boosters raise money or by having a county or the National Park Service help out - are good only for the next fiscal year. The money that the Legislature intends to redirect to the parks from the state Department of Motor Vehicles and other sources is also only a temporary measure designed to buy time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2014 | By Tony Barboza
California air quality officials are again moving to relax tough rules to clean up aging diesel trucks that are among the state's worst remaining sources of air pollution. The changes being considered this week by the state Air Resources Board come in response to pressure from small trucking firms and owner-operators, required to install costly diesel particulate filters or upgrade to cleaner models for the first time this year, who have pleaded for more time to comply. "We're all struggling," said Allen Forsyth of Los Angeles, who operates a three-truck fleet that hauls local freight near LAX. "I used everything I had to buy a 2012 truck.
SPORTS
June 22, 2009 | Mike Penner
Baseball tradition and superstition hold that when a pitcher is working on a no-hitter, no one dare mention it to him for fear of jinxing the effort. That goes for the scoreboard operator too, as it should go without saying. Last Sunday, Cliff Lee of the Cleveland Indians took a no-hitter into the eighth inning against the visiting St. Louis Cardinals. As he stepped on the mound, a trivia question appeared on the scoreboard: "Who was the last Indians pitcher to throw a perfect game?"
OPINION
July 9, 2010 | Luisa Goodwin
The headline on Andrew Blankstein's article on July 3, " LAPD's 911 operators stage a sickout," has a glaring omission: The sickout was not the idea of dispatchers who work for the Communications Division. I know because I am one. While some of those employees participated, this sickout was staged and directed by the Coalition of LA City Unions. It focused on a wide range of city workers in danger of being furloughed or laid off, not just dispatchers. It is unfair for Blankstein to lay the blame on our shoulders alone.
BUSINESS
January 13, 2011 | By Richard Verrier, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles city attorney's office has charged the operators of two local talent service companies with violating the state's talent scam prevention law. The charges mark the latest crackdown on talent management and services companies by the office, which has been on a campaign to ferret out abusive practices by firms that purport to help actors find jobs. David Askaryar, 46, operator of Burbank-based Hollywood Stars Management Inc. and VIP Talent Web Inc., was charged with 16 criminal counts, including charging advance fees for actors, not posting a $50,000 bond with the state labor commissioner and failing to provide artists with written contracts with required disclosures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2010 | By Andrew Blankstein, Los Angeles Times
Nearly three dozen emergency 911 operators staged a sickout Thursday at two Los Angeles call centers, prompting the LAPD to get administrators and other personnel to work their shifts. The sickout to protest furloughs and pay cuts was confined to operators who field emergency calls for the Los Angeles Police Department, officials said. The Fire Department has its own operators. LAPD Assistant Chief Sandy Jo MacArthur said that department officials became aware of a possible work action late Wednesday and prepared plans to cover shifts.
BUSINESS
November 5, 2010 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
The Securities and Exchange Commission filed a civil lawsuit Thursday against two operators of a Los Angeles hedge fund, accusing them of making false statements about the fund's performance and misappropriating more than $2 million of clients' funds. Alero Odell Mack and Steven Enrico Lopez, who operated Easy Equity Management Inc., allegedly obtained $4 million from 25 investors from 2007 until March of this year by overstating past returns and falsely claiming that Mack had unique access to the New York Stock Exchange trading floor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2012 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times
Just before Thanksgiving a few years back, Raquel Lopez fielded her umpteenth call of the day to find an irate man on the line. Someone had littered his lawn with Butterball turkeys. "This is not funny!" he shouted, demanding the shrink-wrapped birds' immediate removal. It was another priceless moment for Lopez, who has been answering L.A.'s 311 information line for seven years. CITY BEAT: Life in Los Angeles "We're like a human Google," she said, laughing one recent morning as she sat, headset on, in a gray cubicle on the 10th floor of a building across Main Street from City Hall.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2014 | By Roger Vincent
Last year, Los Angeles entertainment giant AEG weathered a major corporate shake-up, endured a six-month trial spotlighting its role in the last days of Michael Jackson and fell short in its efforts to bring L.A. a pro football team. Even so, the company - owner of Staples Center, L.A. Live and the Los Angeles Kings hockey team - seems to be on the rebound. Although AEG has taken a decidedly low profile in Southern California in recent months, the company has seen most of its worldwide operations surge.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
Russ Newton joined The Times in 2000 as director of operations and president at California Community News, one of the Times wholly-owned business units. Before joining The Times, he was director of operations from 1998 to 2000 at Landoll Inc., a Tribune Education company. Previously, he led the packaging department at the Orlando Sentinel in Orlando, Fla., from 1994 to 1998, and the production division, press and packaging areas at the Daily Press in Newport News, Va., from 1987 to 1994.  Newton joined Tribune Co. in 1985, serving as a shift supervisor, crew supervisor and trainer at the Chicago Tribune from 1985 to 1987.
WORLD
April 13, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
MOSCOW -- Ukrainian forces launched an "anti-terrorist operation" in the city of Slavyansk on Sunday morning after pro-Russian separatists seized buildings in the eastern area of the country, acting Ukrainian Interior Minister Arsen Avakov said on his Facebook account. "Units from all law enforcement agencies of the country are being used [in the operation]," Avakov wrote. "God is with us!" Armed men in masks and unmarked camouflage uniforms stormed and seized administrative buildings and police stations in Slavyansk and at least two other towns in the coal-mining region of Donetsk on Saturday.
SPORTS
April 9, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
SEATTLE -- Texas General Manager Jon Daniels wanted to cover his eyes every time former Rangers slugger Josh Hamilton barreled toward first base and launched his 6-foot-4, 240-pound frame headfirst into the bag. "He drove me crazy when he did that," Daniels said in a 2013 interview. "You have a 240-pound guy who is as fast and as explosive as he is … you just cringe when he dives in. You're saying, 'Get up! Get up!' But that's his style of play. I don't think you can take that from him. " Hamilton's aggressive - some would say reckless - approach usually serves him well, but his latest ill-advised and instinct-induced dive into first base will take the hot-hitting left fielder away from the Angels for six to eight weeks.
BUSINESS
April 7, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien and Salvador Rodriguez
Microsoft Corp. is finally pulling the plug on a piece of technology that has refused to go away. On Tuesday, the software giant will stop supporting Windows XP, the still ubiquitous computer operating system that's been around for almost 13 years, an eternity in tech terms. Even though XP was born well before smartphones and cloud services took over the tech landscape, an extraordinary number of consumers and businesses have clung to it despite Microsoft's best efforts to get them to upgrade to subsequent operating systems.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Gale Holland
Addressing several lingering skid row conflicts, a top Los Angeles city budget official Monday proposed a $3.7-million cleanup plan that would increase 24-hour bathroom access for homeless people and expand storage for their belongings. The proposal, which must be approved by the City Council, calls for setting up a skid row parking lot where homeless people could check in their shopping carts for the day. The plan would also increase an existing short-term storage operation by 500 bins, from 1,136 to 1,636, and move a 90-day storage facility east of Alameda Street into the heart of skid row. The round-the-clock bathroom access would be provided at skid row shelters and social service agencies under contract to the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1986 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
The Golden Bear in Huntington Beach, one of the Southland's oldest music clubs, was spared from demolition Friday, but the victory offered little consolation to the club's operators, who were evicted late Thursday. The eviction came shortly after a federal bankruptcy judge denied a last-minute bid for an injunction that would have allowed Richard and Charles Babiracki, who have run the Golden Bear since 1974, to remain in business.
NEWS
October 20, 1991
This letter concerns your article "Radio Renegades" (Oct. 2). The glamorization of the illegal and irresponsible activities of a tiny minority of radio operators is an insult to the legitimate participants in the Amateur Radio Service. The legitimate hams provide a unique and valuable service to our community and nation by maintaining, at their own expense, a sophisticated communications system that is often the only reliable means of communication when disaster strikes. The illegal activities of the "renegades" are not harmless pranks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Richard Winton, Kate Mather and Dan Weikel
Authorities are still trying  determine how long an alleged theft ring at Los Angeles International Airport was operating, but say a group of baggage handlers was responsible for one of the largest property heists in the airport's history. As of Thursday, s ix people were arrested in the case, but officials said as many as 25 are thought to be involved in the scheme.  Police said that for months the workers rifled through bags as they separated them for flights going to destinations around the world, looking for items to steal and then sell, sometimes using Craigslist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Robin Abcarian
Ladies, if you're wondering how to use that sexism card you swore off in the 1970s after you got liberated, I suggest you take a look at the masterful performance of one Jennifer Stefano, a regional director of the Obamacare-hating, Koch brothers-funded Americans for Prosperity. She appeared as a guest on Chris Hayes' MSNBC program "All In" Wednesday night to talk, ostensibly, about AFP's objection to the two-week Obamacare deadline extension. The conversation quickly devolved into a one-sided screaming match, with Stefano working herself into the kind of tizzy any parent of a teenager would recognize as phony.
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