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NEWS
May 13, 1991 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Palikapu Dedman stalks across the slick lava rock, crouches for a moment, then pounces on his prey with one quick swipe of his stainless-steel butter knife. "You have to make it a good shot the first time," said the burly Hawaiian, explaining a tradition more than 1,000 years old, "(otherwise) there's no space between the shell and the rock to let your knife through."
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NEWS
May 29, 1991 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Palikapu Dedman stalks across the slick lava rock, crouches for a moment and pounces on his prey with one quick swipe of his stainless steel butter knife. "You have to make it a good shot the first time," explains the burly Hawaiian, following a tradition that dates back more than 1,000 years, "(otherwise) there's no space between the shell and the rock to let your knife through."
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NEWS
May 29, 1991 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Palikapu Dedman stalks across the slick lava rock, crouches for a moment and pounces on his prey with one quick swipe of his stainless steel butter knife. "You have to make it a good shot the first time," explains the burly Hawaiian, following a tradition that dates back more than 1,000 years, "(otherwise) there's no space between the shell and the rock to let your knife through."
NEWS
May 13, 1991 | SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Palikapu Dedman stalks across the slick lava rock, crouches for a moment, then pounces on his prey with one quick swipe of his stainless-steel butter knife. "You have to make it a good shot the first time," said the burly Hawaiian, explaining a tradition more than 1,000 years old, "(otherwise) there's no space between the shell and the rock to let your knife through."
NEWS
June 1, 2003 | Bruce Dunford, Associated Press Writer
An explosion in the Hawaiian monk seal population has created a problem for the 180 native Hawaiians who live off the land and sea on the privately owned island of Niihau. The estimated 100 endangered monk seals, combined with a growing number of off-island boaters coming in to harvest the rock-hugging mollusk opihi off the coast and fish near shore waters, has threatened the traditional and main food supply for the islanders. Niihau residents took their concerns to Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1992 | KIM KOWSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In many ways, the breakwater at King Harbor Marina in Redondo Beach is an angler's paradise. Its waters abound with seabass and bonito, and lobsters and crabs inhabit its rocks. Most of the time, foamy waves lap peacefully against the boulders that make up the mile-long breakwater protecting the harbor. But occasionally, the swell picks up without warning, pounding the rocks with waves fierce enough to turn a station wagon on its side.
TRAVEL
July 23, 1995 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
The perfect beach, like beauty, lies in the eye of the beholder. We suspected as much when we put together our June 11 Hawaii issue, in which we sought out Hawaiians' opinions on the islands' best beaches. Now that readers' letters of response are in, we have documentary evidence to support our theory. But we also have evidence that Hamoa Beach, on the quiet Hana side of Maui, has many friends. Leonard Stegman of Laguna Hills writes that he can't imagine how we could have overlooked Hamoa.
TRAVEL
August 20, 2000 | CHERYL CHEE TSUTSUMI, Cheryl Chee Tsutsumi is a freelance writer living on Oahu
Come luau time at Kaumakapili Church in Honolulu, nobody in the congregation gets much rest. Church members spend four days preparing enough food for the diners--2,000 of them. Chairwoman Ruby Kaneao's shopping list is mind-boggling: 2,100 pounds of pork, 800 pounds of poi, 270 pounds of sweet potatoes, 250 pounds of swordfish, 170 pounds of salmon and 275 whole pineapples.
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